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post #331 of 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
Now that I looked at the blog I realize that the black in the eye area is actually from the manikin and not a part of the top. Woops.

RACIST!!!
post #332 of 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I can't find any of those Klattermusen jackets around here anywhere.
You aren't missing much. They are heavy, brutally expensive, and overly complex, though the use of cotton/Ventile is interesting. The Lundhags boots are good, however. Though not as good as the Jörn M/95 and winter boots, but good luck getting those anywhere outside of Skellefteå.
post #333 of 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbjorn View Post
You aren't missing much. They are heavy, brutally expensive, and overly complex, though the use of cotton/Ventile is interesting.
I think the specific one in the photo is an light(ish) model. If my conversion works out, its around 23.6oz. (670g) for a medium. But thanks. The Brutally expensive part I'm not real fond of. Still a good looking coat.
post #334 of 394
Yeah, I meant heavy as in "not BPL-approved." They're fine coats, but not what I'd want to use backpacking. Pulk-skiing trip between Akka and Sitojaure, maybe.

I think there is some awesome Swedish outdoor gear -
Hilleberg tents
Jörn boots
Lundhag boots (especially on the new last)
Woolpower/Ullfrotte underwear and socks
Fjällräven (mostly the pants as the jackets are too heavy, but the Akka tent is good too)
Tentipi tents
Primus and Optimus stoves
but I am not sure that Klättermusen do much that isn't already available in the US.

It is actually very unfortunate that Fjällräven has become a "lifestyle" brand in the US. They make useful, reasonably priced, if not lightweight, outdoor gear, which would be of use to scouts and other "less extreme" hikers and backpackers in America. Alas, it's mostly Kånken backpacks on girls in SoHo.
post #335 of 394
I think I'm going to go with the MontBell or the RAB.

I like the RAB better, except for the hood. It has a flexible wire that forms a brim, which seems like it would be prone to break after a while. Esp if you are stuffing it. It's really easy to deform. Some people might really like that. I'm a little unsettled by it. Also the pull cords to adjust the hood seem flimsy.

The MontBell down stuff is stupid shiny. The Thermawraps, however are relatively understated and matte. They are pretty nice. Slightly cheaper than the RAB. Slightly less useful pockets though.

I have one week to decide.
post #336 of 394
Ended up picking up the MontBell UL Parka and a pair of Columbia Bugalite 2 boots.


post #337 of 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Also, going to be checking out this ultralight tripod. Seems like a good compromise for what I'm doing. (I understand that it's a compromise in stability over something beefier, I just don't want to carry a real tripod with me)

Are you familiar with the GorillaPod etc? Have packed an SLR through some pretty serious trips and it's always worked for me.
post #338 of 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by brimley View Post
Are you familiar with the GorillaPod etc? Have packed an SLR through some pretty serious trips and it's always worked for me.
Yeah, I've seen them and my buddy has one. I kind of see it as a different class of thing though. With the ball-head it's twice as expensive as the Zipshot, and if you want to get it off the ground, you have to find something sturdy to wrap it around. (which may or may not be available where I'm at) While the Zipshot isn't height adjustable, it is 43 inches off the ground and it COMES with a ball head. Also the Zipshot is 2oz lighter! (not that 2oz really matters) I'm gonna mostly be in snowy/rocky alpine areas. I don't want to be laying on the snow or trying to wrap a gorrilla pod around a snow and ice covered object.
post #339 of 394
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post #340 of 394
Recently, I've decided I wanted to get into bike camping/touring. This made me reconsider any gear I had, and its room and weight. I've always been a tent kinda guy, but apparently a lot of guys use hammocks to get off the ground. Seems extremely practical; anyone have any experience?
post #341 of 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludeykrus View Post
Recently, I've decided I wanted to get into bike camping/touring. This made me reconsider any gear I had, and its room and weight.

I've always been a tent kinda guy, but apparently a lot of guys use hammocks to get off the ground. Seems extremely practical; anyone have any experience?

No, but I have been seriously considering a hammock for months. One thing you need to be aware of is the fact that you will need insulation like an underquilt or sleeping pad below you and a sleeping bag or quilt on top, so a hammock might not be lighter alternative to a tent. Check out hammockforums.com for all the information you will ever, ever need.
post #342 of 394
Yeah, the air underneath will still be cold in cold weather. I figure it will get me off the earth, decreasing heat loss from that heat sink; it will decrease weight compared to a tent; and I won't have to worry about a rolled tarp underneath for rain. Let the research commence!
post #343 of 394
X-Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
post #344 of 394
Nice score Slim. Are you going to be using that pack for overnights? Also, what kinds of shelters are you guys using? I've been debating hammocks for a long time, but I think I'm going to go with a tent, so now it's just matter of which one. Right now I'm leaning towards the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2.
post #345 of 394
Planning a hiking trip in Alaska this summer. I've never flown with my gear before. Regulations seem to suggest it's ok to travel with knives in checked baggage. Anybody fly with their gear before? I'll be taking a large backpack but I hesitate to expose that directly to the baggage handlers, and was thinking of travelling with a large duffel bag with all my hiking and camping equipment inside. Something like this: http://image.sportsmansguide.com/dim...0,300&cvt=jpeg http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=688856 I know I'll get killed on overweight baggage fees, and I'm also worried about this stuff getting lost by the baggage miscreants, then I'm stuck in Alaska without gear. Anybody ever mail something like this to their destination? How is the cost trade off vs. baggage fees?
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