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post #31 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by remn View Post
Got fitted for packs today. Arc Teryx was out of my price point so I ended up walking away with a Gregory Z55 after trying on a lot of packs and walking around for quite a while (the outfitters place had a rock ramp and other stuff which was helpful). With regard to shoes, can I just wear a pair of comfortable sneakers or running shoes?

Gregory makes excellent stuff. As another poster noted, I wouldn't wear tennis shoes or sneakers if you're actually going to be on any terrain that is questionable - even if you're used to carrying a heavy pack. If you're not used to carrying a heavy pack, don't wear sneakers on any terrain. This doesn't mean you have to get a pair of Norwegian welted, six pound boots. There are plenty of options in the lightweight, supportive boot category. Look into La Sportiva, Scarpa, or maybe most appropriately for your needs, Kayland.
post #32 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caomhanach View Post
I am forum moderator for a emergency preparedness website. I will wait for moderator approval to post a link ( it is non profit.) I've found more mindsets entering the wilderness than varieties of backpack. A ultralight proponent is a completely different animal than a survivalist in cammies, buckskinner or horsepacker. My observations and experience show most people carry to much kit. Sometimes nothing but experience will winnow out the kitchen sinks. The flip side is people insist on putting wieght as first priority on the strangest things. A sleeping bag, which I personally consider the # 1 piece of survival gear above all else is to keep you warm. The law of physics cannot be overturned. We need X amount of loft to maintaint X heat ( with variations of body mass, metabolism and other mechanisms used to keep warm.) Most of the rated claims are IN TENTS and using laboratory measures about as real as new car gas mileage. You cannot have a sleeping bag that wieghs 2 oz and rolls up into a grapefruit and expect to be warm in a suprise blizzard. A combative and controversial ( but hard to debate) member of the industry is Jerry Wigetow of www.wiggies.com Read his lengthy materials on insulation. You may go out with a pair of wool army blankets or a goose down mummy bag.Your the guy who crawls into it at night, nobody else. But read Jerry.

it's wiggys.com. And he is a nut (in the good sense).
post #33 of 412
Thanks for the correction D. Milhouse, I don't have direct resources, just several anecdotal observations and opinions from EMT types and outdoor people. Moleskin is NOT a bad product. It has it's place. But like anything consumers expect magic bullets and shoot themselves in the foot- with moleskin literaly. You put it on a soft spot, it sticks and cuts off air. Bacteria goes to town unless you remove it and clean. My friends have cleaned up to many infections from Moleskin slapped on and the problem forgotten until later.Bandaid solutions, with anything never do as well as permanent ones. with feet that may be better hygiene, socks even a boot last or simply an insert or lacing differently. Oh, as an aside. A great read is THE 2 OZ. BACKPACKER by Robert S. Wood TEN SPEED PRESS- they ahve other backpacking titles wsorth a read.
post #34 of 412
Thank you for your honesty. I happen to be both an EMT type and an outdoors type. Moleskin, when used properly, is a good product, in my opinion. It is a tool that I include in my toolbox.
post #35 of 412
RESURRECTION

Hey boys. Last week I went on a day hike with a buddy for the first time. Needless to say I had an awesome time and would like to continue hiking and eventually do some overnight trips. So, of course now I'm going to need to buy some gear. Is there any particular order that you experienced hikers would recommend buying gear? Are all these water purifiers, walking sticks, and other high tech stuff really necessary?

All I have right now is a jansport backback that I used through highschool, and a pair of hi-tec trail shoes.


Thanks in advance
john
post #36 of 412
My father has been backpacking avidly for about 35 years. Whenever it's around Christmastime and he knows we're going to get him some gear, he always reminds us that the most important thing is that everything is as light as absolutely possible. That might or might not apply to overnight trips versus weeklong trips, but that's all I've got.
post #37 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
RESURRECTION Hey boys. Last week I went on a day hike with a buddy for the first time. Needless to say I had an awesome time and would like to continue hiking and eventually do some overnight trips. So, of course now I'm going to need to buy some gear. Is there any particular order that you experienced hikers would recommend buying gear? Are all these water purifiers, walking sticks, and other high tech stuff really necessary? All I have right now is a jansport backback that I used through highschool, and a pair of hi-tec trail shoes. Thanks in advance john
Buy Colin Fletcher's The Complete Walker. It is an old school, hard core hiker/backpacker style book, but it is well written and will give you lots of insight into how backpacking "works" You are unlikely to adopt his style, but understanding it will help you make very good choices. It is in its fourth edition, which should tell you how useful it is. In order, boots, backpack, tent, stove, sleeping bag. That doesn't mean get new - if your boots and backpack are comfortable, keep them. Plus - get a rain shell. Nothing is worse than being wet for long periods. I always liked using an MSR water pump/filter for drinking water and boiling for cooking. For stove, I had always liked kerosene /multifuel stoves like MSRs expedition stoves, but became a late convert to lightweight canister gas stoves.
post #38 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
RESURRECTION

Hey boys. Last week I went on a day hike with a buddy for the first time. Needless to say I had an awesome time and would like to continue hiking and eventually do some overnight trips. So, of course now I'm going to need to buy some gear. Is there any particular order that you experienced hikers would recommend buying gear? Are all these water purifiers, walking sticks, and other high tech stuff really necessary?

All I have right now is a jansport backback that I used through highschool, and a pair of hi-tec trail shoes.


Thanks in advance
john

Here is a pretty good list: http://www.tripleblaze.com/blog/outd...ing-checklist/
You could probably eliminate number 6: Chair and be ok. I'd also add a first kit.
Cooking gear is flexible too (don't need a cooler or charcoal). You don't even really need a stove if you can confidently build a camping fire, but it is nice and you don't have to worry about finding dry wood if it rains.

You are probably going to want a better back pack for over night trips.

You'll want some clothing you can layer, typically not cotton, which definitely includes something to keep you warm (fleece) and dry (poncho/rain gear).

Don't get a down sleepin bag, get a synthetic one.

Get an LED flashlight, and in particular don't get a non-LED maglight. Headlamps can be nice, but I would carry an extra light too.
post #39 of 412
all hikers look the same these days, those fruity shorts, ugly boots, etc...
even when they are doing just an overnight trip, why not just wear some jeans, etc
post #40 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by constant struggle View Post
all hikers look the same these days, those fruity shorts, ugly boots, etc...
even when they are doing just an overnight trip, why not just wear some jeans, etc

http://outside.away.com/outside/gear.../20030327.html

Quote:
No gasping. If you choose to hike in pants that have been implicated in hundreds of cases of near-fatal hypothermia, it's no skin off my nose.
post #41 of 412
interesting... but is that really going to kill you for an overnight trip? I doubt it. Does anyone make stylish hiking gear?
post #42 of 412
For me a water filter is critical. Mind you I tend to do overnight bike trips.

I disagree re: synthetic versus down sleeping bags. Down is warm, light and compacts easily. It is the default choice. I am not aware of a comparable synthetic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by constant struggle View Post
interesting... but is that really going to kill you for an overnight trip? I doubt it. Does anyone make stylish hiking gear?

The short answer for you is stay out of the woods. You're clearly not suited to it.
post #43 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by unjung View Post
For me a water filter is critical. Mind you I tend to do overnight bike trips.

I disagree re: synthetic versus down sleeping bags. Down is warm, light and compacts easily. It is the default choice. I am not aware of a comparable synthetic.



The short answer for you is stay out of the woods. You're clearly not suited to it.

you'd be suprised, ive been camping probably 50+ times in my life...

even for a week at a time... but really i never subscribed to that high tech camping gear stuff...
then again i've never gone backpacking more than 2 days either...
post #44 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by constant struggle View Post
you'd be suprised, ive been camping probably 50+ times in my life...

even for a week at a time... but really i never subscribed to that high tech camping gear stuff...
then again i've never gone backpacking more than 2 days either...

Tenting in a local campground on the fourth of July != overnight hiking in a remote valley in the Rockies. Looking like you could step into a cafe in Naples isn't a priority under those circumstances.
post #45 of 412
As for what gear to get and when. . . I'd say try to think about it logically as you increase the commitment level of your trips.

So, you are dayhiking. . . get the things that are handy for dayhiking:

First aid kit AND TRAINING
Water bottles / hydration bladder
Water treatment chemicals (I rarely ever use a filter anymore. . . too heavy)
Good clothes for a variety of conditions
Good compass so you can start learning land navigation (maybe an altimeter too if you are in the mountains)
Trekking poles (BD flicklocks are by far the superior system)
Knife/multitool (I still end up using mine a lot. . . I've been with others that claim they don't use theirs, some borrow mine, some don't)

If you decide you want hot food mid day, grab a tiny little canister stove (MSR pocket rocket or the like) and a very small one person Ti or Al pot. Those items can serve you well for a very long time. As you get into situations like high altitude, international, winter, etc, you can consider other stoves and pots, but for now, get a tiny, lightweight solo system and you'll get a lot of use out of it.

As you get a lot of dayhiking mileage under your belt, you'll have a much better idea about the conditions you tend to favor, the locations, etc. Then you can start thinking about sleep systems. That is a very expensive and complex topic.
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