or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › A Row of Opportunity: Savile Row's pivot towards RTW
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A Row of Opportunity: Savile Row's pivot towards RTW - Page 8

post #106 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Their biggest competition is sweatpants and jeans.

If anything they are benefitting from a short term reversal in this trend, though it is unclear whether it will re-reverse.
post #107 of 192
The moment I see an SR house open a branch in Dubai or Beijing, offering real bespoke on a daily basis, I will applaud them for understanding where the growth markets in exclusive luxury goods are and for repositioning their brand where it needs to be in the C21st. But they may already have missed that boat.
post #108 of 192
- the emergence of "designer" SR (Boateng, S Hart, and, in my book, R James: despite what David Reeves says, I recall when he started out in around 1992-4, and he was pushing Paul Smith-esque quirky Brit RTW, not bespoke);

I think 22 years ago that was probably a smart move, he's moved on since then but Im sure you could describe RJ as an up market Paul Smith even now.

I think the designer SR is the way forward, because it combines the best of both worlds if done correctly. The designer/design element gives the actual product an identity that can be marketed in a clearer way. It sets out what the brand and product is about and gives focus and direction to something that inherently lacks those things.
Edited by David Reeves - 4/7/14 at 2:38pm
post #109 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Who is stealing customers from Savile Row? On the internet, it is Rubinacci and maybe some other Italians. Plus the independent refugee cutters like Steed or Mahon. Maybe reeves takes a few. They also lose customers, I am sure, to local tailors like Despos or Corvato or logasail. But I don't think they are losing customers to RTW brands. Their biggest competition is sweatpants and jeans.

Certainly would have done if I stole the client list.

You live and learn.
post #110 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

- the emergence of "designer" SR (Boateng, S Hart, and, in my book, R James: despite what David Reeves says, I recall when he started out in around 1992-4, and he was pushing Paul Smith-esque quirky Brit RTW, not bespoke);

I think 22 years ago that was probably a smart move, he's moved on since then but Im sure you could describe RJ as an up market Paul Smith even now.

I think the designer SR is the way forward, because it combines the best of both worlds if done correctly. The designer/design element gives the actual product an identity that can be marketed in a clearer way. It sets out what the brand and product is about.

Thanks, and I pretty much agree - a strong brand identity and a captivating spokesperson is key. Two blokes called Trevor and Ken who know how to sew and can joke about Arsenal's last game doesn't (sadly) cut it in the modern world.
post #111 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geezer View Post

Thanks, and I pretty much agree - a strong brand identity and a captivating spokesperson is key. Two blokes called Trevor and Ken who know how to sew and can joke about Arsenal's last game doesn't (sadly) cut it in the modern world.

This has always been true. Henry Poole made his house the most successful not by being a particularly skilled tailor (supposedly he wasn't) but by being a well-dressed and prominent spokesperson who showed himself around Hyde Park with all the dandies.
post #112 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geezer View Post

Thanks, and I pretty much agree - a strong brand identity and a captivating spokesperson is key. Two blokes called Trevor and Ken who know how to sew and can joke about Arsenal's last game doesn't (sadly) cut it in the modern world.

Well design is important, thats the difference between an architect and a master builder really isn't it?

Savile Row is about service, its all about the client. Always putting the design of your products directly in the hands of your consumers is not always a good idea, by its nature it is for the individual not for the many. If you want to reach lots of people you have to consciously design something to do that.
post #113 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post


You’ve said this continously, but I don’t think anyone here is suggesting they carbon-copy the LVMH / Kering model. Rather it’s a discussion of how they can expand their business in a pragmatic fashion that doesn’t erode the original ethos of the bespoke offering.

 

It's exactly what G&H's chairman is saying.

post #114 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

It's funny when the client of a business says the business shouldn't worry about profit, by the way.

This is exactly my point though, you hyenas see Savile Row in these terms: just a bunch of businesses with bottom lines.

You know, there are other ways of seeing the world. Your view is conditioned by American business culture, which is a very recent invention.
post #115 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geezer View Post

The trends I have seen in 20-odd years as an observer and very minor customer:

- the slow demise of the lesser-known houses (there is now only one proper bespoke tailor on the left side of the Row, - Davies); including through mergers;

- the continuing success of the big names (Poole, Huntsman, A&S);

I think the history of Savile Row is littered with places coming and going and the "big names" now are not necessarily the shops that were "big names" in the past. Places come and go and tailors don't last forever. You can no longer find a suit by Pleydell & Smith or Carr, Son and Woor. You can't find a suit from Hawes & Curtis. And Huntsman, 80 years ago, might have been known for riding breeches but I'm not sure that they held real suit cache pre-Colin Hammick and the 1-button style.

There is something special about longevity and it is hard to achieve. I will be particularly unhappy if Huntsman dies soon, but I'm not sure there is any imminent demise of Savile Row. Even Mayfair rents, which must be the cause of huge problems for the traditional tailoring houses, can reverse direction in a heartbeat.
post #116 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

This is exactly my point though, you hyenas see Savile Row in these terms: just a bunch of businesses with bottom lines.

You know, there are other ways of seeing the world. Your view is conditioned by American business culture, which is a very recent invention.

The British Empire was built on commerce!

The bottom line is they are businesses, if you made every worker on SR a millionaire tonight I doubt many would go back to work in the morning. Yes I think we like our jobs better than most bankers and lawyers but its still work and its hard work.
post #117 of 192
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

The British Empire was built on commerce!

The bottom line is they are businesses, if you made every worker on SR a millionaire tonight I doubt many would go back to work in the morning. Yes I think we like our jobs better than most bankers and lawyers but its still work and its hard work.

+1

I'm not a native-born American, but disagree strongly with this silly notion that American business practices are somehow antithetical to helping build and preserve British businesses. Welcome to the 21st century.

agiffy - agree with all you said, except one can still buy Carr, Son & Worr suits - order from Denman and they'll put the labels in smile.gif
post #118 of 192
post #119 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

This is exactly my point though, you hyenas see Savile Row in these terms: just a bunch of businesses with bottom lines.

You know, there are other ways of seeing the world. Your view is conditioned by American business culture, which is a very recent invention.
,
England is a nation of shopkeepers. That insult was taken as a compliment and should continue to be a point of pride.
post #120 of 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post


 But I don't think they are losing customers to RTW brands. Their biggest competition is sweatpants and jeans.

 

This is the most lucid thought in the thread.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › A Row of Opportunity: Savile Row's pivot towards RTW