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What Colour Shirt with Beige Suit

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have thrifted this phenomenal beige sharkskin suit.  I have a couple of occasions to wear it this year, and will probably find one or two more.  I've never had, or thought, about a suit of this colour, but it is actually now the best suit I own.  It's fully canvassed, hand finished, made from beautiful fabric, and generally awesome.

 

I'm really not sure what colour shirt, and tie, to wear with it.  I might make this my first shirt from one of the low-cost MTM vendors, like Luxire.  I'm feeling like white isn't going to be best.  Top picture is probably a little truer to colour, but second picture is in more natural light, and I'll be wearing it outdoors.  What sort of colours should I be considering?

 

 

I know the sleeves need to be lengthened (there is enough ease t let them down 3/4" easily), and the pants shortened a touch.  I don't really like it with those shoes, either - might go with burgundy?

post #2 of 11
Blue and blue-white striped. As always smile.gif
post #3 of 11
This is a difficult colour, especially where the suit is wool and you have a relatively light complexion.

You need something to break up the expanse of light colour that the suit and your face would otherwise make. White can be good for the advanced and those with darker complexions, otherwise something like a royal blue/white gingham, a red/white gingham (depending on skin tone), or there is a photo of SkinnyGoomba somewhere on this thread wearing a larger check purple/white gingham to nice effect. I think the best for me is a wider royal blue/white stripe - like the Italian gentleman below (although I know that is a tobacco coloured suit, it works with beige). Light blues and sky blues don't work as well unless you have tanned skin.





post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stiva View Post

This is a difficult colour, especially where the suit is wool and you have a relatively light complexion.

You need something to break up the expanse of light colour that the suit and your face would otherwise make. White can be good for the advanced and those with darker complexions, otherwise something like a royal blue/white gingham, a red/white gingham (depending on skin tone), or there is a photo of SkinnyGoomba somewhere on this thread wearing a larger check purple/white gingham to nice effect. I think the best for me is a wider royal blue/white stripe - like the Italian gentleman below (although I know that is a tobacco coloured suit, it works with beige). Light blues and sky blues don't work as well unless you have tanned skin.
 

+1, excellent response. I also think pale lilac/lavender works well with beige in addition to more saturated purples, again if you're tanned, like with light/sky blue.

 

Stiva, the bolded quote - I remember this being stated by Manton in the white shirt thread, but don't recall every seeing an explanation anywhere. I've tried white with my beige sport coats from time to time and never, ever been satisfied with the result - what's the secret? No tie or PS selection I've tried seems to remedy.

post #5 of 11
Yes Andrew, I have read the same statement and been similarly unable to find an explanation. I have a beige suit in tropical wool that presents problems, and various posts on this site indicate this is a common experience.

In summary, I think it may be a number, or sometimes a combination, of factors that govern the success or otherwise of the white shirt.

If the suit is linen or cotton with a slubbier or rougher texture the contrast of a smooth white shirt may work. Conversely, a smooth wool suit will not provide the same textural contrast.

Tan skin can help - but usually only Mediteranean type skin.

If the tan suit is a grey-toned tan rather than a yellow-toned tan, a white shirt provides a better contrast. Same thing if the suit is just darker generally.

A navy or chocolate coloured tie can help break up the expanse of lighter fabric.

Some people just give up on the beige/tan suit - including, I have seen on this site, people with advanced skill and taste like Claghorn.

This doesn't work even though it's professionally photographed for commercial purposes.



This works, probably because it's a grey-toned tan and because it's Ryan Gosling.



Sometimes it looks like it works, probably because it's Warren Beatty.



But then on a different viewing it doesn't work even though it is Warren.

post #6 of 11

Wow, grey-toned tan really does seem to make a big difference - Gosling notwithstanding. Unfortunately none of mine are like that; c'est la vie.Thanks.

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post
 

I know the sleeves need to be lengthened (there is enough ease t let them down 3/4" easily), and the pants shortened a touch.  I don't really like it with those shoes, either - might go with burgundy?

 

I would go definitely go with brown over burgundy with beige. Also, consider having the jacket shortened a bit if you can stomach it; it looks a bit disproportionate on your frame.

post #8 of 11
I agree that burgundy shoes would be wrong. Chestnut or tan, including in spectators if you're somewhere more casual.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Ryan View Post
 

 

Also, consider having the jacket shortened a bit if you can stomach it; it looks a bit disproportionate on your frame.

 

That's from the angle of the photo.  The length is actually pretty much spot on.

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post

That's from the angle of the photo.  The length is actually pretty much spot on.
Just a suggestion from seeing this and previous fit photos you've posted-- keep the camera level.

When the camera is tilted down, especially with wide angle lenses, the perspective makes your legs look short. Looking at the refrigerator makes this effect of perspective more obvious.

Level the camera and if possible, move it farther away and use a longer focal length lens to minimize distortion.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by breakaway01 View Post


Just a suggestion from seeing this and previous fit photos you've posted-- keep the camera level.

When the camera is tilted down, especially with wide angle lenses, the perspective makes your legs look short. Looking at the refrigerator makes this effect of perspective more obvious.

Level the camera and if possible, move it farther away and use a longer focal length lens to minimize distortion.

 

Thanks.

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