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Lining a Harris Tweed in Moleskin?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I have 2m of a 15oz. Harris Tweed that I would like to have made into a casual jacket. I'd like the coat to be suitable for the roughest of NYC winters, and am considering having it lined in 16oz. moleskin.

Anyone ever done this before? Thoughts?
post #2 of 11

Try asking on the Tweed Appreciation Thread.

post #3 of 11
I fear that you maybe just short if the tweed you need. With moleskin it will be very heavy and cumbersome to wear, is it really necessary or have you considered silk which wears 'hot'.
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

I fear that you maybe just short if the tweed you need. With moleskin it will be very heavy and cumbersome to wear, is it really necessary or have you considered silk which wears 'hot'.

Hmm, you feel just a single-lining of 16oz. moleskin would be a bit much? I figured the total ~30oz. weight would be comparable to a heavy melton peacoat I have.

I have used silk in the past, but frankly, it didn't do much in terms of added warmth. Maybe a lighter-weight (10-11oz.) flannel?

Typically, I would just ask my tailor, but my new tailors in HK doesn't have much experience with this sort of thing and have asked me to guide them.
post #5 of 11
Go for a heavier tweed cloth instead
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

Hmm, you feel just a single-lining of 16oz. moleskin would be a bit much? I figured the total ~30oz. weight would be comparable to a heavy melton peacoat I have.

I have used silk in the past, but frankly, it didn't do much in terms of added warmth. Maybe a lighter-weight (10-11oz.) flannel?

Typically, I would just ask my tailor, but my new tailors in HK doesn't have much experience with this sort of thing and have asked me to guide them.

I do, quite apart from being heavy and cumbersome.

Little surprise about an HK tailor, they would certainly not be accustomed to this. I would seriously try a good heavy silk which would have a more pleasant feel and be very warm.
post #7 of 11

This is a dumb question, but isn't some Harris tweed woven in half-widths? A 15 oz. fabric on a half-width loom would be 30 oz. full width, right?

 

I may be barking up the wrong tree, but I know my 14 oz jeans feel a lot lighter than most Harris tweed I've handled. Of course, this may be because the Harris is more loosely woven, and so the actual weight is not that different.

 

When you say "casual jacket," what are you describing? If you're looking for pure outerwear, moleskin (not at all breathable) would certainly keep you warm, but a lighter brushed cotton might work a bit better.

post #8 of 11
All this talk of the lining of tweed jackets reminded me of a question I've always had. What is the rationale of an unlined tweed jacket? I assume that one would only wear tweed when it's cold. So what is the point of an unlined tweed jacket, which presumably would undercut its ability to keep the wearer warm?
post #9 of 11
^It makes the jacket function more like a sweater. I've had four tweed jackets made, and they're all fully lined. But I used to own an unlined BB tweed jacket. The lack of lining probably made it slightly more casual, drapey, smaller to pack, and breathable. But I do prefer lining for easy on/off.

My only concern w/ the moleskin linking is that it would make putting it on and taking it off a bit difficult, particularly when wearing a sweater. I'd go w/ the heavy silk GBR suggested or maybe a smooth finished wool, maybe even worsted flannel. Iirc, it was fairly common for overcoats to be lined w/ smooth woolens.

What did you end up deciding, GC?
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbowtie View Post

All this talk of the lining of tweed jackets reminded me of a question I've always had. What is the rationale of an unlined tweed jacket? I assume that one would only wear tweed when it's cold. So what is the point of an unlined tweed jacket, which presumably would undercut its ability to keep the wearer warm?

Might not really be an issue in the UK where tweeds are often worn with wool/cotton blend shirts,
heavy sweaters, vests etc. and under a rain and wind proof jacket or coat.

For example:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_BUOfb81B9EE/TR2A4WAOD7I/AAAAAAAAGYU/gippmdZ0AaI/s1600/wellis%2Bshooting0002smlis5.jpg
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by YRR92 View Post

This is a dumb question, but isn't some Harris tweed woven in half-widths? A 15 oz. fabric on a half-width loom would be 30 oz. full width, right?

No - most fabric measurements (certainly all quoted here) are for a square piece - a yard square in the case of oz measurements. The other option is by the running yard / metre which would indeed differ by the width of the fabric.

So a 15oz half-width fabric, in common usage, will be the same weight as a 15oz full-width fabric when made into a garment.

Oh, and to the OP - tweed of that weight isn't actually that thick and would probably be overwhelmed by an equivalent-weight moleskin since the moleskin is cotton and less dense (so the moleskin will probably end up being thicker than the tweed).

Either use the tweed as originally intended with a heavyweight lining (silk, or a heavy bemberg if you can find a source) which is largely appropriate to its weight, or get a heavier tweed to begin with.
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