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Official Sales Alert thread - Page 2913

post #43681 of 51233
What would be overwhelmingly significant? On say, a ~$500 item

and agreed that matches is great, but almost too good. I've felt bad ordering an $80 patrik ervell shirt that arrives to NY in one day. and on the other hand, they aren't that great that I'm going to buy there if I can find a better price elsewhere

also, the difference in service does matter more when dealing with international stores, I don't disagree with that (canada seems to be more or less no different than a US store, ssense especially)
post #43682 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Very few people.  But they need to right the ship, and it appears that they might signaling that here.  A lot of other retailers seem to be taking on that painful and expensive task.

I went to the store a few weeks ago and they seem to be doing pretty well. They have different prices in every region, and are planning to open a five story flagship in Montreal. If you think about it even though the USD prices are low, they are still getting a pretty decent price in CAD, which is their basis. I predict one more outstanding sales season (even better than this one) for Canadian retailers before we correct.
post #43683 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Regg View Post

What would be overwhelmingly significant? On say, a ~$500 item

and agreed that matches is great, but almost too good. I've felt bad ordering an $80 patrik ervell shirt that arrives to NY in one day. and on the other hand, they aren't that great that I'm going to buy there if I can find a better price elsewhere

also, the difference in service does matter more when dealing with international stores, I don't disagree with that (canada seems to be more or less no different than a US store, ssense especially)

Probably $60+? I've rolled the dice on random retailers before, but receiving what I ordered/not getting my information sold/etc. >>>>> saving a few bucks. At the end of the day, I think something is awesome enough, I'll pay retail and be happy about it, even if it goes on sale later in my size.
post #43684 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrVenneri View Post

AWESOME Canada Goose prices! I've been looking for a Chateau jacket for quite sometime...Unfortunately that's the only model they're not discounting.

Word to the wise for all those who have never tried a Canada Goose on in person...They run very slim. I'm a 42R suit and a large in most slim fit items, medium in regular fit...The large fits me like a glove, but no room for layers.

http://ruggedoutdoors.com/the-chateau-jacket-men-s.html
post #43685 of 51233

I think there's something to be said for establishing customer loyalty early on in a patron's life that will see greater returns in the future. 

 

Lots of stores (that I couldn't afford to shop at regularly when I was younger) gained my loyalty by still treating me like a valued customer, even if I bought what I could afford during the end of season sales. Kafka, NMWA, Gentry, and a few others come to mind as places I will continue to do business with as my disposable income increases.Obviously the internet has ruined this a bit, but hopefully etailers can find a way to sustainably cater to two sets of customers; those who have limited funds and are willing to risk waiting for price drops, and those with more disposable income who have higher time preference.

 

Sometimes I wonder if the right answer isn't putting new stock up at full price and then having prices decrease at a constant rate, maybe getting discounted by 5% off total every two weeks. It would create a more perfect market for clothing and might free us from the sale cycle madness. 

 

Maybe that's not how fashion works though. 

post #43686 of 51233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Regg View Post

unless they find a way to limit the increasing number of stores available to consumers, carrying the same items, that is a recipe for disaster. stores can't set prices. the brands are what dictate what consumers are willing to pay at this point. there are very few brands that can handle not going past 30% off, and only a select number of items from those brands. what stores offer such bad service that you're willing to pay an extra 5-10% for this so-called "better" service? returnable vs final sale is a selling point but I'm not too sure what else. most of these high end stores provide quite adequate service.

What you will probably see are more stores and more brands going out of business before the dust settles.  e-commerce has been on a boom that cannot last forever, in all sectors, and I suspect that fashion is oversaturated.  A store has to differentiate in some way, and optimize for their particular market or it will go away.  The one ray of light is that MRSP has been deemed, by and large, NOT to be cartel pricing.  That may stem, to some degree, the drive to the bottom.

 

Incidentally, no moral judgement here at all.  The consumer should do what is best for the consumer, unethical or illegal practices being the exception.

post #43687 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariokartfever View Post

I think there's something to be said for establishing customer loyalty early on in a patron's life that will see greater returns in the future. 

Lots of stores (that I couldn't afford to shop at regularly when I was younger) gained my loyalty by still treating me like a valued customer, even if I bought what I could afford during the end of season sales. Kafka, NMWA, Gentry, and a few others come to mind as places I will continue to do business with as my disposable income increases.Obviously the internet has ruined this a bit, but hopefully etailers can find a way to sustainably cater to two sets of customers; those who have limited funds and are willing to risk waiting for price drops, and those with more disposable income who have higher time preference.

Sometimes I wonder if the right answer isn't putting new stock up at full price and then having prices decrease at a constant rate, maybe getting discounted by 5% off total every two weeks. It would create a more perfect market for clothing and might free us from the sale cycle madness. 

Maybe that's not how fashion works though. 

I agree w/ your initial point for sure. And think the bold (mine) thought is interesting. I don't think it would actually work, as the timeframe for people making a full price purchase is pretty big, really, hence the sales cycle being what it is. But it does raise a novel basis for conversation about how a different discounting model might look.
post #43688 of 51233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariokartfever View Post
 

I think there's something to be said for establishing customer loyalty early on in a patron's life that will see greater returns in the future. 

 

Lots of stores (that I couldn't afford to shop at regularly when I was younger) gained my loyalty by still treating me like a valued customer, even if I bought what I could afford during the end of season sales. Kafka, NMWA, Gentry, and a few others come to mind as places I will continue to do business with as my disposable income increases.Obviously the internet has ruined this a bit, but hopefully etailers can find a way to sustainably cater to two sets of customers; those who have limited funds and are willing to risk waiting for price drops, and those with more disposable income who have higher time preference.

 

Sometimes I wonder if the right answer isn't putting new stock up at full price and then having prices decrease at a constant rate, maybe getting discounted by 5% off total every two weeks. It would create a more perfect market for clothing and might free us from the sale cycle madness. 

 

Maybe that's not how fashion works though. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oboy_oboy View Post

I agree w/ your initial point for sure. And think the bold (mine) thought is interesting. I don't think it would actually work, as the timeframe for people making a full price purchase is pretty big, really, hence the sales cycle being what it is. But it does raise a novel basis for conversation about how a different discounting model might look.

I could easily this a more gradual discount model working, though 2 weeks is shorter than even the Zara/Banana Republic/whatever fast fashion/high street retailer works.  Remember, this is an industry where deliveries being a month or two late is not uncommon.  However, a graduated sales season that strikes me as a possible new discount method.  Or the discount comes in the form of a credit that can be used for other purchases.  This is essentially jet.com's business model, and will work if the number of retailers in a network is large enough, since you are much more likely to be able to use that credit.

post #43689 of 51233
Norse Store sale has started (kind of). It's not on their main page yet, but is accessible through the link. Some Blue Blue Japan, Engineered Garments, Orslow, etc.
post #43690 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjmin209 View Post

Norse Store sale has started (kind of). It's not on their main page yet, but is accessible through the link. Some Blue Blue Japan, Engineered Garments, Orslow, etc.

 

Here is the link http://www.norsestore.com/catalog?on_offer=1

post #43691 of 51233
post #43692 of 51233
SuitSupply Outlet sale is up:
http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/outlet.html

Use password BETHEFIRST to enter.
post #43693 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I could easily this a more gradual discount model working, though 2 weeks is shorter than even the Zara/Banana Republic/whatever fast fashion/high street retailer works.  Remember, this is an industry where deliveries being a month or two late is not uncommon.  However, a graduated sales season that strikes me as a possible new discount method.  Or the discount comes in the form of a credit that can be used for other purchases.  This is essentially jet.com's business model, and will work if the number of retailers in a network is large enough, since you are much more likely to be able to use that credit.

Didn't Wingtip do this or something very similar a few seasons ago (and/or maybe still do?) It was called something like a "risk/reward" sale - a set number of pieces and a stated rate of discount so you knew at week 10 it would be X% off and could just shark the timeframe that met your budget. Literally, you could plan out "ok, I really want one of those and it's not going to last so I'll get that now - but that other thing, I'd take it at 40% off - that's 4 weeks from now [set a reminder]" I don't follow them closely so I don't know how well it worked out, but it made enough of an impact for me to remember it here...
post #43694 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjmin209 View Post

 

Lol. My mistake, I didn't notice the hyperlink. 

post #43695 of 51233
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 

Put it this way.  They are not going to lose you as a customer because of that.  They are going to lose you as an 85% off customer, who is virtually worthless to a retailer.  If they ever decide that they need to liquidate stock, you will still be there, since you are price motivated.  They would much rather cultivate the customers at full price or even at 30% discount, since those customers tend to be more loyal for a lower discount and better service.

 

I`m only an 85% percent customer when it comes to stocks that don`t sell, however as a customer of three years, I have bought numerous items at 30-50% which a have a high percentage of selling out like slp items. It's almost impossible to expect consumers to not be price oriented when there are so many e-retailors with extravagant sales and discount stores everywhere. The only way you get full price customers is if they are green in this market or have a higher income than most individuals. 

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