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ModernTailor collars are WRONG!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I order two shirts with spread collars and received cutaway collars instead.  I thought this was a very odd mistake because the difference is obvious.  Then, I noticed that the ModernTailor website actually reverses the labeling of spread collars and cutaways!  And not only in their descriptions but also on the ordering page too!

 

http://www.moderntailor.com/static/mt/styleguide/collar.jsp

 

Obviously, there is no way that a spread collar should be wider than a cutaway collar.  How odd that a popular tailoring website can not only promulgate but operate on such a critical misunderstanding.

 

So be warned if ordering from this website.  Now, I will find out how good their refund policy is.

 

post #2 of 11

Hello, we would like to help. In the order process, we offer photos for customer to choose which collar they like. We even add the collar height and point to point width. Then the customer submits the order, after seeing the dimensions and clicking on the button of their chosen collar. If we had made a mistake, please let us know as we can definitely help in sorting out the problem :)

 

Please email us the collar you have received. We can also send you an order summary of the order you made so we can align the two and make sure we created the collar you have requested online. 

post #3 of 11
I too noticed they call a spread collar a "cutaway" and a cutaway collar a "spread". It's indeed confusing when they call things the wrong names. When I ordered shirts from them a few years ago I got the large cutaway collar, which is a great classic spread with my perfect proportions. The only thing I don't like about the collar is how the band isn't angled or curved down in front.
post #4 of 11
If someone doesn't comprehend the meanings of cutaway and spread, then I would inquire if the person speaks English as a second language, i.e. not as native speaker, or does not bother to reflect or research meanings. Or may have a manual, but not verbal intelligence. In the case of the representative of a manual craft who needs to understand his clients, a neglect of concern about terminology spreads unhappiness and cuts away profit.
post #5 of 11

Thank you for all the feedback. We would like to take these suggestions on board regarding our collar selections as currently our styles are based on designs like Londoner collar for our widespread collar and Ainsley or Medium Spread for our Cutaway collar. These collars are almost the same as collar designs from Brooks Bros and mytailor. Please send us reference links for consideration and we will advise our website team and production team.

 

Emerson M.

Moderntailor.com

post #6 of 11
I wouldn't recommend stealing Brooks Brothers' names. Medium spread would be a good name for your "cutaway." If you call it a medium spread, "wide spread" might still make sense for your cutaway collar.
post #7 of 11
Asians don't simply need a ghostwriter - they need labor unions for their exploited workers, not to mention women and children.
post #8 of 11
OP - not to be a jerk, while the pictures and names don't seem to jive with what may be generally thought to be a spread or a cutaway, it is up to the consumer to understand the product they are buying. Since it appears they make the pictures available on the site, it is your fault for assuming and not checking. There are plenty of websites out there that have a slightly different interpretation of something, many times in a head scratching way. But just because their definition doesn't match yours doesn't mean they are in the wrong. If I owned the business, I would not give you your money back. (but I don't, so good luck)


However, pointing this out is helpful for others who wish to buy in the future.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am pleased to say that customer service associates at ModernTailor.com have been very responsive and helpful.  They have offered to re-make the shirts, which is is excellent post-sale service.  My thanks to EmersonM and Leah Deguzman for all of their help. 

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CousinDonuts View Post

OP - not to be a jerk, while the pictures and names don't seem to jive with what may be generally thought to be a spread or a cutaway, it is up to the consumer to understand the product they are buying. Since it appears they make the pictures available on the site, it is your fault for assuming and not checking. There are plenty of websites out there that have a slightly different interpretation of something, many times in a head scratching way. But just because their definition doesn't match yours doesn't mean they are in the wrong. If I owned the business, I would not give you your money back. (but I don't, so good luck)


However, pointing this out is helpful for others who wish to buy in the future.


I take your point, however, the images the customer sees when going through the ordering process are, in my opinion, mislabeled compared to convention.

 

The picture on the left is representative of the actual shirt, and the picture on the right is what you see when ordering.  Perhaps it is just the different angles of the photographs that make the collars look so different to me, but that is all the more reason for customers to be able to rely on conventional product labeling.

 

If I look at a picture of a blucher that is labeled a balmoral, I still know what I am getting.  In this case, it is much more ambiguous for the customer.

 

post #11 of 11
I thought the main purpose of a definition is intelligible communication i.e. so the other person knows what you mean.

Of course, I've heard of the difference between a real and a nominal definition, but the problem here is sloppy terminology and disinterest in language. If the motive is purely financial gain, cultural ignorance is nearsighted.
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