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post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post

There should be some sort of SF annual award to people like you, who have not only bucked the trend to schlubbiness but inspired a policy change to uphold lapsed standards. Well done sir. Your next mission, should you choose to accept it, is to get a jacket and tie policy enforced in any restaurant in your city. Good luck!
Hear, hear!
post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radhruin View Post

Teacher. Lower secondary school at the moment. SC, shirt and dress trousers, chinos or jeans. No tie, as it would be slightly out of place, and because it can be somewhat unpractical when you're surrounded by 25+, at times rowdy, kids.  This is most days though, depending on the classes I'm teaching on a given day  I might wear just jeans and a hoodie or somesuch, as it improves my approachability with regard to some of the pupils. 
As a (now required) teacher, I couldn't disagree more with your point on "approachability". "Approachability" is in the manner of the person wearing the clothes, not in the clothes themselves. One could be "approachable" dressed formally. I wore a jacket and tie (I won't wear a jacket without a tie) to the end of my teaching days in an upper secondary school, and was never considered "unapproachable".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post

You have to judge your own context so I apologies if this comes off as overly acerbic, but as a once and possibly future teacher / professor its my view that teachers are constantly banging on about the lack of respect and salary they get compared to any of the other old and established professions. The thought of a teacher of any sort in hoody and jeans makes me shiver and wonder why the aforementioned complaints exist. Would you respect a lawyer, a doctor, an accountant, a judge, a CEO who came to work in a hoody and jeans? You can always make the claim that clothes don't correlate with how well anyone can do their job, but I will make the counter claim that there IS something of a correlation between a certain standard of dress and the respect and commensurate salary.
I am sure this is true - and as true on this side of the Atlantic as on yours.
post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChetB View Post


Slight derail, but I'm wondering, Dig: have you considered a more SW&D-based approach to your dress code, since wearing black is less of an obstacle in that context? You could still keep it conservative with basic, classic tailoring-inspired pieces—I'm thinking some Peir Wu-like trousers and a poplin hidden placket shirt or something.

Then again I don't know the exact nature of your work so maybe I'm off base.

wow, i actually agree with where you are going with this.    pehaps we got off on the wrong foot?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digmenow View Post


I am too old and unhip to do SW&D with any authority. The dress code requires pants at the waist and shirts tucked. I have a black, box hemmed camp shirt that I daringly wear untucked on warm days when I am 100% certain that no corporate types are in town. Here's an ironic photo of me trying to do something in one of last year's themed threads. My right boot is exposed only for the purpose of photographic documentation of the footwear. I was NOT responsible for the graffiti. (Click to show)

Interestingly (to me), it was advice from the very persona memorialized in spray can black in that picture who gave me some sound advice on my wardrobe for work. His post was quoted (thereby saving it from the now infamous "...") in the thread linked to my sig below.

I have tried to follow it ever since.

Dig, i like you. so listen to me just this one time.........   YOU are NEVER to old to own streetwear.  it just requires learning the same as anything else.   one of japan's best streetwear -focused designers is aged over 70!!!!!    so feel free to ask myself or Barrel, or Troika.   we can help you bridge the gap,- without looking like you were dressed by a girl who works at GAP.

Yes, your SW&D game needs a little work.  but you are a handsome man (no homo) and could look real fresh in the right fit.   "CM" might make you look older.   young and fresh look = more acting jobs. hit me up.

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamson View Post


As a (now required) teacher, I couldn't disagree more with your point on "approachability". "Approachability" is in the manner of the person wearing the clothes, not in the clothes themselves. One could be "approachable" dressed formally. I wore a jacket and tie (I won't wear a jacket without a tie) to the end of my teaching days in an upper secondary school, and was never considered "unapproachable".


It wasn't a definition of approachability, but a statement on what works in a particular situation. 

post #35 of 48
Kirby (@kirbya from The Hanger Project) posted this story on his Tumblr - I thought it was a great story and appropriate for this thread:

http://hangerproject.tumblr.com/post/79370405832/i-am-overdressed
post #36 of 48

I work in a compagny of 500 persons at the headquarter level. We are probably 4 persons on a daily basis wearing a tie and a jacket or a suit.

 

The usual attire is Jeans and polo or shirt too large.

 

Our CFO wears jeans, t shirts and hoodies.

 

No we're not a startup, at all.

 

I'm wearing a tie every day.

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

This question has always been a rough one for SF because it sort of reveals the absurdity of our obsession with tailored clothing... truth is most of us couldn't wear our suits anywhere besides work and special events even if we wanted to. I respect the guys who do, and I sure as hell hope they're pulling it off, but in most of the US it just doesn't fly as acceptable wear. Obviously in certain circles on say the east coast it's a different story; but if you're the normal young Sf-er then the majority of reactions to suits will be negative- anything from douchebag to awkward nerd; being overdressed is not a cool place to be. The fact that errant compliments from females are frantically reported on SF doesn't mean whole lot.

That being said, I think there's a lot more potential for a jacket-less, tie-less tailored look than most people realize. Impeccably tailored trousers and a sturdy dress shirt, even with sleeves rolled up, can be just as much to play with and perfect as a suit; and without the distraction of the suit more attention can focus on awesome shoes. I've always thought that such a look is objectively more flattering to the male physique than the suit, and trends in centuries past tend to support that.

I'm mainly a stay at home dad, looking after the kids. Dropping them off to school and picking them up in the afternoon. Before this I spent years working in the movie business. T shirt and jeans and Doc Martens was pretty much it on a film set.
I can wear what I like, but since I've become more sartorially minded in the past 2 or 3 years, I've felt slightly constrained by what I can wear, especially in the past year, when I have slowly built up a small collection of ties. I used to have 2, which came out of the wardrobe for weddings, but now I have about 25 -30, and they get worn a little more frequently, but still not that often. Sometimes I'll wear one during the day but remove it before collecting the kids from school. Otherwise I just gets bewildered comments. Everyone knows I'm not working in an office environment, so a tie just does not compute.

I now own about 7 suits, but never really get to wear them.
Wore one about two weeks ago when my wife and I went out to dinner at a local restaurant on my birthday. While there, we bumped into two couple we know, and after dinner we joined them at their table. The women had all obviously dressed up a bit to go out, but the two men were almost identically dressed in jeans and untucked shirts. They looked at me in a suit in confusion, Like they really didn't know what to think.
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post

...

Dig, i like you. so listen to me just this one time.........   YOU are NEVER to old to own streetwear.  it just requires learning the same as anything else.   one of japan's best streetwear -focused designers is aged over 70!!!!!    so feel free to ask myself or Barrel, or Troika.   we can help you bridge the gap,- without looking like you were dressed by a girl who works at GAP.
Yes, your SW&D game needs a little work.  but you are a handsome man (no homo) and could look real fresh in the right fit.   "CM" might make you look older.   young and fresh look = more acting jobs. hit me up.
Hah! I'll think about it. Keep in mind that I thrift EVERYTHING that I wear with the exception of the black JAB shirts that I wear. In three years of searching, have found less than 5 pieces of denim that were better than Levis/Diesel quality. Not even a single piece of APC. My chances of thrifting a quality SW&D wardrobe is minimal at best but I still look.
post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

This question has always been a rough one for SF because it sort of reveals the absurdity of our obsession with tailored clothing... truth is most of us couldn't wear our suits anywhere besides work and special events even if we wanted to. I respect the guys who do, and I sure as hell hope they're pulling it off, but in most of the US it just doesn't fly as acceptable wear. Obviously in certain circles on say the east coast it's a different story; but if you're the normal young Sf-er then the majority of reactions to suits will be negative- anything from douchebag to awkward nerd; being overdressed is not a cool place to be. The fact that errant compliments from females are frantically reported on SF doesn't mean whole lot.

Perhaps part of the problem is wearing SF-approved get-ups. That's clearly far, far from what your average people wear. I wear suits on a regular basis in a place where they're rare (Silicon Valley) and rarely get any comments asking if I had an interview that day (etc.), but the suits that I commonly wear definitely wouldn't get anything more than sneers and other even less friendly forms of derision if I posted a picture of me wearing them. I really like the nicer suits from my days working in finance, but they defintely don't work out here.

 

A few years ago, I had a meeting in the afternoon with people from a big bank so I dressed like a banker for the meeting (Kiton DB, etc.). In a meeting that morning with one of our engineering teams I actually had an engineer say that he was too intimidated by the suit and wanted to bail on the meeting and try it again the next day. That's something that never happens if I wear a cotton suit from J. Crew and a knit tie, for example. And the same general thing holds for outside of work. 

 

So in my experience it's definitely possible to wear suits on a regular basis where other people don't, but not all suits will work for this. And that may mean doing things in a non-SF-approved way.  

post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radhruin View Post

Teacher. Lower secondary school at the moment. SC, shirt and dress trousers, chinos or jeans. No tie, as it would be slightly out of place, and because it can be somewhat unpractical when you're surrounded by 25+, at times rowdy, kids.  This is most days though, depending on the classes I'm teaching on a given day  I might wear just jeans and a hoodie or somesuch, as it improves my approachability with regard to some of the pupils. 

I'm a teacher as well, middle school, in my position can wear very much anything I like, including hoodies and jeans. biggrin.gif ...in fact if I were to wear a jacket and tie, let alone a suit, they'd probably think..."Where's the wedding?"....sometimes put a blazer* on though.

"navy blue tailored jacket with metal buttons.
post #41 of 48
I work in the healthcare field (not a physician) and the clothes I wear are meant to get soiled. The only time I get to wear my suits is if there is an occasion that calls for it. I used to regularly wear shirts and sport coats or blazers during weekends when I go out. Initially, my friends saw me as being overdressed but they got used to it eventually. However, I changed to wearing a shirt, jeans, and leather jacket because it was just easier. Of course, they were surprised again because they weren't used to it. Lol!

Now, I'm starting a new job. It's still healthcare related but I'm required to wear a business attire or at the least business casual. I'm looking in my closet and thinking I don't have enough clothing for business attire. Lol! Well, more on I don't want to use what I have for daily work wear.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

This question has always been a rough one for SF because it sort of reveals the absurdity of our obsession with tailored clothing... truth is most of us couldn't wear our suits anywhere besides work and special events even if we wanted to. I respect the guys who do, and I sure as hell hope they're pulling it off, but in most of the US it just doesn't fly as acceptable wear. Obviously in certain circles on say the east coast it's a different story; but if you're the normal young Sf-er then the majority of reactions to suits will be negative- anything from douchebag to awkward nerd; being overdressed is not a cool place to be. The fact that errant compliments from females are frantically reported on SF doesn't mean whole lot.

That being said, I think there's a lot more potential for a jacket-less, tie-less tailored look than most people realize. Impeccably tailored trousers and a sturdy dress shirt, even with sleeves rolled up, can be just as much to play with and perfect as a suit; and without the distraction of the suit more attention can focus on awesome shoes. I've always thought that such a look is objectively more flattering to the male physique than the suit, and trends in centuries past tend to support that.

But does mean a whole lot. :)  

 

I work in the public sector.  My stakeholders are better represented when I show up to work wearing suit.  

post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwmarti View Post
 

Perhaps part of the problem is wearing SF-approved get-ups. That's clearly far, far from what your average people wear. I wear suits on a regular basis in a place where they're rare (Silicon Valley) and rarely get any comments asking if I had an interview that day (etc.), but the suits that I commonly wear definitely wouldn't get anything more than sneers and other even less friendly forms of derision if I posted a picture of me wearing them. I really like the nicer suits from my days working in finance, but they defintely don't work out here.

 

A few years ago, I had a meeting in the afternoon with people from a big bank so I dressed like a banker for the meeting (Kiton DB, etc.). In a meeting that morning with one of our engineering teams I actually had an engineer say that he was too intimidated by the suit and wanted to bail on the meeting and try it again the next day. That's something that never happens if I wear a cotton suit from J. Crew and a knit tie, for example. And the same general thing holds for outside of work. 

 

So in my experience it's definitely possible to wear suits on a regular basis where other people don't, but not all suits will work for this. And that may mean doing things in a non-SF-approved way.  


The "Approved" look is not really that great. just wear the best you can.   20+ thumbs on a crap fit is not worth copying. because in the real world, you would look like you dressed to get likes from random men on the internet.   assess your surroundings, and dress accordingly. albeit a little better than those around you.

post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwmarti View Post

Perhaps part of the problem is wearing SF-approved get-ups. That's clearly far, far from what your average people wear. I wear suits on a regular basis in a place where they're rare (Silicon Valley) and rarely get any comments asking if I had an interview that day (etc.), but the suits that I commonly wear definitely wouldn't get anything more than sneers and other even less friendly forms of derision if I posted a picture of me wearing them. I really like the nicer suits from my days working in finance, but they defintely don't work out here.

A few years ago, I had a meeting in the afternoon with people from a big bank so I dressed like a banker for the meeting (Kiton DB, etc.). In a meeting that morning with one of our engineering teams I actually had an engineer say that he was too intimidated by the suit and wanted to bail on the meeting and try it again the next day. That's something that never happens if I wear a cotton suit from J. Crew and a knit tie, for example. And the same general thing holds for outside of work. 

So in my experience it's definitely possible to wear suits on a regular basis where other people don't, but not all suits will work for this. And that may mean doing things in a non-SF-approved way.  

How are you defining SF-approved in this context? Are you thinking of CBD specifically or something else? There are a lot of tasteful looks that I'd think would be "SF Approved" but certainly not CBD. J. Crew may not be SF approved but in general I don't think a cotton suit and knit tie would draw much in the way of objections and I kind of doubt a more SF approved cotton suit would result in a different perception from your coworkers. I think the big difference is probably between more formal and more casual suits, shirts and ties than whether something is "SF approved."
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post


How are you defining SF-approved in this context? Are you thinking of CBD specifically or something else? There are a lot of tasteful looks that I'd think would be "SF Approved" but certainly not CBD. J. Crew may not be SF approved but in general I don't think a cotton suit and knit tie would draw much in the way of objections and I kind of doubt a more SF approved cotton suit would result in a different perception from your coworkers. I think the big difference is probably between more formal and more casual suits, shirts and ties than whether something is "SF approved."

I'm thinking the sort of stuff you see pictures of posted here. Some of the outfits are extremely elegant, but might not fit in in many offices while more casual outfits that include a suit might fit in just fine. That's based on my single data point (me), of course. I wear suits, yet in a more casual way, on a routine basis and really don't get many comments about them. But if I wear something less casual, that's when I get comments. And it's also when women visibly drool. I've had women stop their cars and roll down their windows to tell me how nice I look when I'm wearing the fancier stuff, for example, but absolutely never get that reaction when dressed more casually, yet still in a suit. So your summary of being the difference between causual and formal seems to be a perfect summary of the difference. 

 

So if you like wearing suits and still want to fit in in your more casual workplace, maybe casual suits are a good way to do this.  

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