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Art - Page 6

post #76 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
Are you trying to call our process insincere? Cashing up on art you don't believe in and generally acting like a crass bore is now okay as long as you do it under the umbrella of postmodernism. We'll be in touch, we were thinking about auctioning the work before they're actually done, sayin the auctioning is part of the artist's creative process.
Yea - I was on the phone with eBay and they offered to sponsor it
post #77 of 1582
Other artists whose work we own (again, not the actual pieces we own):




Eric Johnson (no, not the one you might have heard of -- a wood sculptor whose work I can't easily find on the net right now)

Kurt Kauper

Neil Tait:



Robbie Conal:
post #78 of 1582
Nearly all the art in our place (i.e. probably 10 or 12 paintings, 5 or 6 sculptures) are by my wife's mother. I'm very happy about this deal as I really love her art
post #79 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by spertia View Post
Damien Hirst just created what is apparently the most expensive piece of artwork ever made; it's a platinum skull covered with 8,601 diamonds, with a total weight of 1,106 carats. The material costs were more than £14 million, and the piece is now for sale at White Cube in London for £50 million.


Hirst's work, but who's skull?
If it's real it would /could add a whole other level of meaning to this...
post #80 of 1582
So here's a question about photography.

How would you assess the price of the work of a talented young up and comming photographer? I'm interested in fashion photography, and it seems that many of them who have just gotten a few big jobs are around $1000 for a print of maybe 5per edition. Is this fair?

How do I try and establish fair market value so that I know I'm not getting soaked, and if I think the guy is being a little adventurous, I can say something?
post #81 of 1582
One of my favorite "unknown" (meaning you probably won't find him in textbooks or art journals) Technically, one of the best. IMO Did a series of rodeo cowboys in the 60 -70's, modern and not the typical cowboy / indian cliche. To see the paintings in person, they are quite stunning. Jame Bama[/quote] After seeing your fav. cowboy/indian paintings, I sincerely hope that you are not teaching Art at any college. Here is a helpful hint on how to navigate a modern art scene:http://www.bidstrup.ru/content/1406.html
post #82 of 1582
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist View Post
So here's a question about photography.

How would you assess the price of the work of a talented young up and comming photographer? I'm interested in fashion photography, and it seems that many of them who have just gotten a few big jobs are around $1000 for a print of maybe 5per edition. Is this fair?

How do I try and establish fair market value so that I know I'm not getting soaked, and if I think the guy is being a little adventurous, I can say something?

I'd say that $1,000 would be FMV for, lack of better works, "up and coming" photographers. An edition of 5 is great, if you look on ClampArt at a lot of the other photography on there from someone who may have one book, if that, there are prints in an edition of 15-20 that sell for $1,000-$2,000. I'd also take into account print size. Unless you are buy a vintage photograph I'd personally expect something to be at least 10x10 for that price.
However, with a fashion photographer I'd make sure that everything is in fact signed and numbered. If you're buying it from a gallery make sure to talk with the owner (or the photog if from them directly) and just ask for about how long they've been in the industry, how long they've been selling prints, etc.
Who was it that you had in mind?
post #83 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2NYC View Post
I'd say that $1,000 would be FMV for, lack of better works, "up and coming" photographers. An edition of 5 is great, if you look on ClampArt at a lot of the other photography on there from someone who may have one book, if that, there are prints in an edition of 15-20 that sell for $1,000-$2,000. I'd also take into account print size. Unless you are buy a vintage photograph I'd personally expect something to be at least 10x10 for that price.
However, with a fashion photographer I'd make sure that everything is in fact signed and numbered. If you're buying it from a gallery make sure to talk with the owner (or the photog if from them directly) and just ask for about how long they've been in the industry, how long they've been selling prints, etc.
Who was it that you had in mind?

This one guy, Alex Norden.

I'm also splurging and getting 2 by Bruce Davidson from his "Time of Change" collection, as well as a somewhat well known photograph from an edition of 50 of Dinah Washington. These are a bit more expensive though.
post #84 of 1582
Thread Starter 
I like this: http://www.artnet.com/artwork/424709...unglasses.html

I can't say I like any of Norden's work (on his site).
post #85 of 1582
Pierre Huyghe is one of my favorite artists.

http://www.artnet.com/Magazine/featu...ltz2-14-01.asp
post #86 of 1582
I thinkt hat photography is a lot tricker to buy than people give it credit for. It is vry easy to get incredibly bored with photographs tha you like on first glance. I would say that most of those shown here would fall into that catagory. We have photographs at home from Michael Kenna, Richard Misrach, Masao Yamamoto and some lesser knowns. I would have to say that while the Kenna's are technically spectacular and beautiful, they bore the daylights out of me. Conversely the Yamamoto works are more difficult to understand but have become more ineresting with time.
post #87 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkzzzz View Post
One of my favorite "unknown" (meaning you probably won't find him in textbooks or art journals)
Technically, one of the best. IMO
Did a series of rodeo cowboys in the 60 -70's, modern and not the typical cowboy / indian cliche.
To see the paintings in person, they are quite stunning.

Jame Bama

After seeing your fav. cowboy/indian paintings, I sincerely hope that you are not teaching Art at any college.

Here is a helpful hint on how to navigate a modern art scene:http://www.bidstrup.ru/content/1406.html[/quote]


I think you could benefit from more education, mine or anyone elses.
post #88 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor View Post
After seeing your fav. cowboy/indian paintings, I sincerely hope that you are not teaching Art at any college.

Here is a helpful hint on how to navigate a modern art scene:http://www.bidstrup.ru/content/1406.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor View Post

I think you could benefit from more education, mine or anyone elses.

I am all ears. Please tell me what am I missing in cowboy/indian kitsch?
post #89 of 1582
post #90 of 1582
I was at Border's for whatever reason yesterday and decided to pick up a copy of the latest Artnews, since the cover article was about portraiture. It seems every essay I read on contemporary or at all recent portraiture goes on and on about how it critiques society and politics, as if portraits have never done that before. I may be negatively inspired enough to re-read the article and write an alternate, substituting the works they describe for historical ones that still apply.

I will admit, however, that I was so frustrated that I did not get through the entire article and actually set down the magazine in favor of a woodworking zine talking about William H. Macy's hobby of woodturning.

Also, managed to flip through Modern Painters without seeing a single piece of interest.
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