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Art - Page 88

post #1306 of 1579
That's sort of the MO of minimalism. It's affecting in person, kind of pointless otherwise. That's why guys like Fried and Greenberg accused minimalist artists of resorting to theatrics. I like theater though, so the accusation doesn't bother me.
post #1307 of 1579
nm
Edited by mordecai - 7/13/12 at 10:34am
post #1308 of 1579
Quote:
The mind of the spectator and of the hearer must remain perfectly free and intact; it must issue pure and entire from the magic circle of the artist, as from the hands of the Creator. The most frivolous subject ought to be treated in such a way that we preserve the faculty to exchange it immediately for the most serious work. The arts which have passion for their object, as a tragedy for example, do not present a difficulty here; for, in the first place these arts are not entirely free, because they are in the service of a particular end (the pathetic), and then no connoisseur will deny that even in this class a work is perfect in proportion as amidst the most violent storms of passion it respects the liberty of the soul. There is a fine art of passion, but an impassioned fine art is a contradiction in terms, for the infallible effect of the beautiful is emancipation from the passions. The idea of an instructive fine art (didactic art) or improving (moral) art is no less contradictory, for nothing agrees less with the idea of the beautiful than to give a determinate tendency to the mind.

However, from the fact that a work produces effects only by its substance, it must not always be inferred that there is a want of form in this work; this conclusion may quite as well testify to a want of form in the observer. If his mind is too stretched or too relaxed, if it is only accustomed to receive things either by the senses or the intelligence, even in the ost perfect combination, it will only stop to look at the parts, and it will only see matter in the most beautiful form. Only sensible of the coarse elements, he must first destroy the aesthetic organisation of a work to find enjoyment in it, and carefully disinter the details which genius has caused to vanish, with infinite art, in the harmony of the whole. The interest he takes in the work is either solely moral or exclusively physical; the only thing wanting to it is to be exactly what it ought to be - aesthetical. The readers of this class enjoy a serious and pathetic poem as they do a sermon; a simple and playful work, as an inebriating draught; and if on the one hand they have so little taste as to demand edification from a tragedy or from an epos, even such as the "Messias," on the other hand they will be infallibly scandalised by a piece after the fashion of Anacreon and Catullus.
Quote:
INFINITY, though of another kind, causes much of our pleasure in agreeable, as well as of our delight in sublime, images. The spring is the pleasantest of the seasons; and the young of most animals, though far from being completely fashioned, afford a more agreeable sensation than the full-grown; because the imagination is entertained with the promise of something more, and does not acquiesce in the present object of the sense. In unfinished sketches of drawing, I have often seen something which pleased me beyond the best finishing; and this I believe proceeds from the cause I have just now assigned.
Quote:
Art is not, as the metaphysicians say, the manifestation of some mysterious idea of beauty or God; it is not, as the aesthetical physiologists say, a game in which man lets off his excess of stored-up energy; it is not the expression of man's emotions by external signs; it is not the production of pleasing objects; and, above all, it is not pleasure; but it is a means of union among men, joining them together in the same feelings, and indispensable for the life and progress toward well-being of individuals and of humanity.
Quote:
Art is as much a need for humanity as eating & drinking. The need for beauty & for creations that embody it is inseparable from humanity & without it man perhaps might not want to live on earth. Man thirsts for beauty, finds & accepts beauty without any conditions but just as it is, simply because it is beauty; & he bows down before it with reverence without asking what use it is & what one can buy with it.

Edited by mordecai - 7/11/12 at 3:52pm
post #1309 of 1579
Went seeing "New York Photography 1890 - 1950" today. Photographs from Stieglitz, Man Ray, Evans, Steichen, Feininger and many more. Really great stuff. I'm glad I went.
post #1310 of 1579
I have an oil painting in dire need of restoration, anybody have experience and/or tips about this?

For example, we were told that because there is some separation of the paint from the canvas, we have a couple of options:

1) A thin coat of varnish over the surface of the painting. In theory this will hold the paint together on the surface, and will protect from dirt and grease

2) A more extensive treatment involving soaking the entire canvas in a "glue" like solution, to re-adhere the paint to the surface of the canvas.

#2 is at least 2X more expensive than #1, and is both more intrusive and less reversible than #1

Cost isn't a huge concern, although if #2 is risky or otherwise ill-advised then we'd rather not spend the extra money.
post #1311 of 1579
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Speaking of perplexing rectangular quasi-monoliths, Donald Judd's brass boxes are really something otherworldly in person. I don't care for him in general, but wow.
484
284

Also never been a big Judd fan myself but this looks incredible.
post #1312 of 1579
Went to a bunch of terrible openings this weekend, and one good one. Images aren't up yet, but I'll post some when they are. In the meantime, LA people should go see the group show up at David Kordansky Gallery.

Side note: I decided to give our new light rail line a try. Took me an hour and a half to get from Chinatown to the Expo stop on La Cienega (it's about 20 minutes by car). Metro money well spent!
post #1313 of 1579
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Went to a bunch of terrible openings this weekend, and one good one. Images aren't up yet, but I'll post some when they are. In the meantime, LA people should go see the group show up at David Kordansky Gallery.

Side note: I decided to give our new light rail line a try. Took me an hour and a half to get from Chinatown to the Expo stop on La Cienega (it's about 20 minutes by car). Metro money well spent!

mordecai, how many exhibits do you attend in, let's say a month?
post #1314 of 1579
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

mordecai, how many exhibits do you attend in, let's say a month?

As far as galleries, I usually only go to openings in Culver City and the occasional one in Hollywood or Lincoln Heights. I see shows in Chinatown because my girlfriend's gallery is there. There are about 3 galleries I will make sure to see in Culver City, and another 3 or 4 there that I'll visit if I feel up to it. They're all within a few blocks of each other and many coordinate their openings, which occur every seven or 8 weeks. So I guess I go to Culver City about once every two months and then probably other openings once or twice in the same time.
Museums I only go to if there is a specific show I want to see, which is probably about 2-3 times per year, per museum. These are MoCA, LACMA, and Hammer, though the first has gone populist in a big way and the last one has been pretty awful since you guys up north pilfered our amazing chief curator.

Probably averages about 4 exhibits a month, usually seen on the same night, though there are often months where I don't go see anything.
Since my SO is in the art world, we usually go to openings (rather than just visiting the galleries during normal hours), and openings are a really shitty way to experience art.
post #1315 of 1579
Yeah, a lot of the openings/shows are in horrible spaces and located in South of Market area in SF. Understandably they happen to often have shitty art as well.
post #1316 of 1579
SFMoMA is a great museum but San Francisco has basically no good galleries. Jessica Silverman and Altman Siegel occasionally show good art, but everything else contemporary seems to be pretty horrible.
post #1317 of 1579
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

SFMoMA is a great museum but San Francisco has basically no good galleries. Jessica Silverman and Altman Siegel occasionally show good art, but everything else contemporary seems to be pretty horrible.

btw, this is partly a matter of taste, but also something of a size issue I think. We have about 12X the population of SF I believe, and 3-6X as many good art schools, depending on whether you consider CCA good (there are those who don't think SFAI is worth a damn either, though it gave LA some of its stars). And for all that we probably only have about 25-30 good galleries, with less than 10 being consistently good, and maybe 5 where a bad show is surprising. Two of those 5 were really bad on my last visit, incidentally.
There just isn't *that* much good contemporary art.
post #1318 of 1579
This past week+ in Rome:
A solo walking tour of Bernini public works plus the Berninis in the Borghese. I had seen all of them before other than the Ecstasy of Saint Teresa.
A tour of Caravaggio works, mostly in Roman church's, but also in some galleries (plus the recently restored Lazarus that was on loan from Messina)
An amazing temporary Miro exhibit

Vacation is fun.
post #1319 of 1579
There probably isn't a better sculptor than Bernini. There may be some who are as good, but none better.
post #1320 of 1579
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

There probably isn't a better sculptor than Bernini. There may be some who are as good, but none better.
The Borghese has something he did when he was 11. It wasn't that great.

His finger painting aside, the Bernini sculptures are my favorite art in Rome, which makes the Borghese my favorite place to visit. I am bummed that I didn't know about one in Santa Maria de Poppolo, especially as I was there looking at the Caravaggios. I haven't made a specific effort to see all his work accessible to the public in Rome, but I am sure I have seen a lot of it. Maybe next summer I will make a more deliberate attempt.

Also, may favorite fountains are Bernini - the Triton, Apis, Barcca (the latter two more for usefulness) and Tartarughe (not all is Bernini, but the best parts are).
Edited by dopey - 7/19/12 at 3:28pm
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