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Art - Page 76

post #1126 of 1582
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post #1127 of 1582
Attended a great lecture yesterday about issues in contemporary art conservation. Really fascinating.
post #1128 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Attended a great lecture yesterday about issues in contemporary art conservation. Really fascinating.

Does menstrual blood take well to varnish?
post #1129 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post


Does menstrual blood take well to varnish?

That kind of issue, and how to preserve things with performative aspects as relics or as artwork, and having to make a choice, and then an additional choice of when to let something die. They showed some amazing slides. For example I had no idea that this famous Eva Hesse work:

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was originally clear:

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It also cannot be hung at this point or else it will disintegrate. It lies in storage on a sort of coffin custom built to the contours it had settled into.


In some cases, conservators have to invent new substances that will act as temporary varnish. There are a lot of things to consider with any contemporary art, more so with conceptual work. It has an impact. Apparently some early conservator in the field explained to de Kooning that his mixing of sunflower oil with paint had essentially doomed all of his paintings. I guess he was so disturbed that he stopped painting and when he finally began again started using more classical mixtures.
post #1130 of 1582
With a lot of conceptual work no degree of aging is tolerated as an industry standard I guess. A tiny chip on one of these boxes in a Sol Lewitt piece led to the decision to strip and refinish the entire set, which is contrary to all traditional notions of art conservation, because as a field it is generally obsessed with original material, original paint, artist's touch, etc....

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post #1131 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

Attended a great lecture yesterday about issues in contemporary art conservation. Really fascinating.

The curator of the Frick gave a lecture regarding Dutch golden age restorations.... its amazing what they can find out with a few x-rays and some varnish samples.
post #1132 of 1582
I have some caricature books by Leonetto Cappiello, can someone guide me about their possible value to collectors of his work.
post #1133 of 1582
Have any of you used SaatchiOnline.com to discover or purchase new art?

I'm representing an artist who's considering using it to sell prints. Would you be comfortable with purchasing photography this way?
post #1134 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by CouttsClient View Post

Have any of you used SaatchiOnline.com to discover or purchase new art?

I'm representing an artist who's considering using it to sell prints. Would you be comfortable with purchasing photography this way?

Discover, yes. One of my friends, an art history prof, regularly links to that site on her facebook page. I usually click to check it out.
post #1135 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by CouttsClient View Post

Have any of you used SaatchiOnline.com to discover or purchase new art?
I have visited the site but have not purchased. While it's not always the case, I tend to want to see a piece in person before I pull the trigger. Were it a print I'd previously seen, I could be tempted.
post #1136 of 1582
Thanks guys. It does appear to be a reasonably good place to discover new things. Nice interface. I'm going to play around with it for another week or so before giving him my opinion about it.
post #1137 of 1582
All I know is that it was derisively called the artworld myspace for awhile. I think people associate it with very young artists, and the obsessive buying of young art for a couple years before the crash. Not sure of what role it has now, but the buyers I know of who were using it for art speculation no longer are. It was popular as a way of bypassing gallery prices by people who thought they would pay $500 for something that would be worth $5000 next month, and in some cases that occurred, but that market kind of collapsed. Too many people trying to inflate the value of too many unrepresented and unpromising artists.

Might be a good way to sell some stuff cheap, but I can't imagine it will help an artists prices. I believe it was thought of as a way to maybe pick up art before the artist found representation, but with so many galleries closed and the remaining ones a million times pickier, it looks more now like artists who can't get representation.
Edited by mordecai - 8/24/11 at 2:43pm
post #1138 of 1582
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

All I know is that it was derisively called the artworld myspace for awhile. I think people associate it with very young artists, and the obsessive buying of young art for a couple years before the crash. Not sure of what role it has now, but the buyers I know of who were using it for art speculation no longer are. It was popular as a way of bypassing gallery prices by people who thought they would pay $500 for something that would be worth $5000 next month, and in some cases that occurred, but that market kind of collapsed. Too many people trying to inflate the value of too many unrepresented and unpromising artists.

Might be a good way to sell some stuff cheap, but I can't imagine it will help an artists prices. I believe it was thought of as a way to maybe pick up art before the artist found representation, but with so many galleries closed and the remaining ones a million times pickier, it looks more now like artists who can't get representation.

Interesting. Thank you
post #1139 of 1582
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http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/2011/07/postmodernism-is-dead-va-exhibition-age-of-authenticism/
Quote:
Grinberg remembers Johnson coming back from a trip to Italy with pictures of Florentine buildings and recalls the fundamental change in his thinking. “With all that reflection and refraction, modernism creates the illusion that there is an illusion when in fact it is a straightforward statement of money and power. But we wanted to get away from that. We wanted to say something else. There was a return to ornamentation—and there was a frivolity—something over and above the brutal structural form of the old modernist designs.
post #1140 of 1582
I emailed and asked a gallery if a piece is available, they said yes and can deliver it for 500 pounds or so. What is the most tactful way to ask for a better price? Should I offer what I want to pay? I feel I should handle this differently then SF B&S.
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