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Nick's Boots - Page 6

post #76 of 377

Viberg and I believe WESCO as well are using a strict stitchdown construction, which is a rather different construction style. Danner is the other big brand using stitch down but it's fairly popular on high end hiking boots. As far as I know, the rolled or "rolled norwegian" construction that White's and Nicks use is primarily limited to small bootmakers in the northwestern US.

post #77 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by SiegfriedFuerst View Post
 

Viberg and I believe WESCO as well are using a strict stitchdown construction, which is a rather different construction style. Danner is the other big brand using stitch down but it's fairly popular on high end hiking boots. As far as I know, the rolled or "rolled norwegian" construction that White's and Nicks use is primarily limited to small bootmakers in the northwestern US.

 

It seems a bit more complex than strictly stitchdown construction to me.  They nail the upper into the insole at the heel, and they nail on the midsole up to the ball, then it is stitched to the vamp around the ball and the toe of the boot.  Finally, the outsole is stitched on.  I see the similarity between stitchdown and what Viberg and Wesco do, in that the upper is turned out and "stitched down", but true stitchdown as I understand it, doesn't use a midsole at all, and I would assume it to be nail less as well.  See these diagrams of traditional stitch down (click to enlarge):

 

post #78 of 377
All very informative.

No thoughts on Nick's Mckay stitching? I always associated McKay as a slightly inferior method of construction, used on a lot of mid-level Italian shoes like Gravati, lower-end A. Testoni, Mezlan. I'm surprised to find it used on sturdy American work boots. Perhaps not all McKay is equal - Nick's seems to drive home the point that their McKay involves multiple levels of stitching.
post #79 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trapp View Post

All very informative.

No thoughts on Nick's Mckay stitching? I always associated McKay as a slightly inferior method of construction, used on a lot of mid-level Italian shoes like Gravati, lower-end A. Testoni, Mezlan. I'm surprised to find it used on sturdy American work boots. Perhaps not all McKay is equal - Nick's seems to drive home the point that their McKay involves multiple levels of stitching.

 

Here they are talking about Blake/Rapid construction using the McKay stitching machine.  It is actually a very robust construction, and many prefer it to Goodyear-welting, since the possibility of rib failure doesn't exist.  The McKay stitched line isn't as robust as their standard "Rolled welt" line, but it's still a stout boot. 

post #80 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

So after finding this thread and some of these photos/drawings, it's helping clear up the small niche of construction style that Nick's, White's, Viberg, and Wesco use.  The illustration above seems to leave out the final outsole.  As I understand it, Viberg is simply using the same method without the welt.  Is that everyone else's understanding?

Yes. Besides, Viberg makes nailed down boots as well.
http://vibergboot.wordpress.com/2009/11/05/factory-4/
http://vibergboot.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/serviceboot-sampleonly-horsehide-dead-stock-half-sole-nailed-down/

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trapp View Post

All very informative.

No thoughts on Nick's Mckay stitching? I always associated McKay as a slightly inferior method of construction, used on a lot of mid-level Italian shoes like Gravati, lower-end A. Testoni, Mezlan. I'm surprised to find it used on sturdy American work boots. Perhaps not all McKay is equal - Nick's seems to drive home the point that their McKay involves multiple levels of stitching.

Here is a stitchdown construction by Wesco/Viberg: stitching (red), glue (green), and nails (blue). I suppose McKay is sturdier than glue.

post #81 of 377
Thanks to both of you.

What drove me to this thread was a recent opportunity to handle a pair of older Nick's Contenders, an 8" boot that may have been their Ranger model. They had 'Contenders' stamped on the boot shaft and, knowing only a little about Nick's, I thought that was the model. The boot had obviously been worn hard and it featured what I'm sure was one of their standard calf leathers. The leather had that tough character that others have described as sort of 'plastic' but I was impressed. The boots had not only held up to a ton of abuse but the leather had taken on a natural, attractive patina, with the black fading out to a nice even brown that was almost speckled. It's a true work-house leather that, as others have mentioned, shouldn't really be compared to a rich oily leather like Horween CXL, which acquires character after a very short period of wear.
post #82 of 377

Very Nice collection and discussion here.

post #83 of 377

 

What do you guys think of this Nicks Romeo boot?  I ordered these in black for a couple of reasons but none of them really fashion oriented.  Anyways, they will be the perfect shoe for my occupation but man I am catching a lot of flak from my co-workers.  So I am just curious what other people (besides them) thought while I wait for them to be built!  At the very least, I am excited to have something durable and comfortable.  

post #84 of 377

Somebody 'shopped the top of your boot out.

post #85 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegTan View Post

 

Great graphic. Really makes the construction clear. Do you happen to know if that's Identical the the Viberg construction or if it's more specific to Wesco?

post #86 of 377

Patattack, 

 

I've never beena  fan of a bump toe like that with the high heel and waist when there's no real shaft to balance it out. IMO, that's not a good choice of last for the shoe. However I suspect it should hold up really well. 

post #87 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by SiegfriedFuerst View Post

Great graphic. Really makes the construction clear. Do you happen to know if that's Identical the the Viberg construction or if it's more specific to Wesco?

There are small differences. Besides a sock lining, it looks like Viberg inserts a bottom filler. I'm not sure about its material.
http://vimeo.com/7021260

post #88 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegTan View Post


There are small differences. Besides a sock lining, it looks like Viberg inserts a bottom filler. I'm not sure about its material.
http://vimeo.com/7021260

Here's a cut-away of a Viberg boot. It doesn't look like there's any filler. I know Viberg has boots that aren't made with these materials over at WorkBoot.com. Maybe that's one of those. As far as I know, any filler would be after the liner is attached to the insole.

 

At one minute and 20 seconds into this video, you can see that the insole is visible:


Edited by misterjuiceman - 2/19/14 at 9:49am
post #89 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegTan View Post


There are small differences. Besides a sock lining, it looks like Viberg inserts a bottom filler. I'm not sure about its material.
http://vimeo.com/7021260

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by misterjuiceman View Post
 

Here's a cut-away of a Viberg boot. It doesn't look like there's any filler. I know Viberg has boots that aren't made with these materials over at WorkBoot.com. Maybe that's one of those. As far as I know, any filler would be after the liner is attached to the insole.

 

 

At one minute and 20 seconds into this video, you can see that the insole is visible:

 

 

It just looks like a piece of leather that they have inserted for the bottom filler.  When you watch the video carefully, you can see a slight sheen with some grain character.  It is hard to tell which model they are showing, or if it is indicative of general use, since there seems to be plenty of other boots shown in the video that don't have a bottom filler.

 

That said, a bottom filler in and of itself isn't really an indicator of overall quality.  It can also be true that some pairs will require some or more bottom filler than others depending upon thickness of the leather uppers/lining, etc.  Even in the highest end bespoke men's dress shoes, thin leather (Kid) or felt is sometimes used when necessary for bottom filling.  It's simply one of those "adjustable" nuances of a product that is made by hand (or in Viberg's case, hand guided machine made with high quality natural materials).  The greater amount of human involvement allows for subtle adjustments that will make for a better end product.  Boots made by factories like Viberg should have less fluctuation between pairs than a truly bespoke piece of footwear, but there will still be needs for adjustments given the level of human involvement and the quality of materials they use.  

post #90 of 377

It's interesting that they're using leather. Carreducker has said in thier blog that they use felt or cork specifically because leather can occasionally cause squeaking and is stiffer/takes longer to break in (although the second consideration probably isn't a concern for Viberg). 

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