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Critique My Wardrobe - Page 2

post #16 of 31
have only skimmed the thread, but wanted to point out... (and I have no doubt I'll get some flak for all this)

1. a few of your items are rather dated and/or reflect an immature view of menswear. For example, blue shirt, contrast white cuff/collar. Meh, was popular in the 80's and guys who don't know better think they're "spiffy". Your last blue shirt, the darkish blue one I think is French blue, something that was popular around the mid 90's. Your black shirt, unless you're wearing it out for a night on the town or something, it's a toss. Your darkish green shirt, donate. Dark red and dark red checks are business casual, which is fine, but those colors are a bit too flashy. Generally shirts should be lighter than the tie or suit/sportscoat. If you're doing patterns, either make them very simple or small, or simple and large scale. Bright colors are a no go until you've mastered the basics. Start with white, blue in all sorts of patterns, and add in some skin tone appropriate variations like very light - pink, purple, green, yellow, and really these are pretty far down the list. the half zips were popular, but like 10ish years ago? maybe a bit less, but they're very "banana republic IT guy".

2. Resist the urge to go for the extremes, the bright colorful stuff, the dandy, the fun thing you saw on the cover of GQ, that thing your father always did, etc. Start with simple solid basics and work from there. Fit is king. Find your voice through the subtle details of shape, proportion, fabric texture, pattern, etc. Start there. Color is one of the last stages because it's so easy to go overboard. And if you have something that calls attention, then make everything else around it neutral and restrained so it doesn't go over the top. I've seen this happen over and over again with middle aged to older guys. They have a dated view of menswear from the 80's where it was big bold over the top or they have Astaire aspirations or something and they focus on all the crazy wild fun 'visual interest' stuff instead of getting the basics right.

3. ignore brands, focus on fit. You've listed off a stack of brands like they're a high and low list and will earn you credibility with the community. is "Brooks Brothers, Loro Piana weather system" supposed to help me? How about a fit picture so I know if it even makes sense? Learn about fabric, fit, construction (it's overrated IMO), and what works for you. Don't get so hung up on this or that brand and having the 'right' ones. Learn to understand if an item is right for you, and then figure out if it's worth the asking price. I have a total mixed bag of low to high end brands and mix them fairly consistently. Brands imply something, but if you have your own voice, that's what'll come through. Guys who really know their own taste just go MTM/Bespoke. They don't bother with brand this or that, just the styling. Get to know your tailor (find a good one) and tailor things if necessary. Of course, don't buy it if it doesn't work, but within reason. A tailor will take a $20 shirt and charge you $25 and you're left with a $200 MTM looking shirt.

4. Find what really works for you, not what you see or like or want to try. Don't waste time, money, and energy on the excess stuff early on. Focus on the core elements and learn your body shape, style preferences, realistic needs, etc. So for example, do you need white linen pants? does a light bottom and dark top work for your frame? Think more about cuff size, lapel width and pant length. Don't focus on pocket squares just yet, or colorful socks. Those are the excesses that brighten up a solid foundation. Keep it simple and solid. Your priorities should be on fit and solid basic pieces that you'll get a lot of use out of. Start there.
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master-Classter View Post

have only skimmed the thread, but wanted to point out... (and I have no doubt I'll get some flak for all this)

1. a few of your items are rather dated and/or reflect an immature view of menswear. For example, blue shirt, contrast white cuff/collar. Meh, was popular in the 80's and guys who don't know better think they're "spiffy". Your last blue shirt, the darkish blue one I think is French blue, something that was popular around the mid 90's. Your black shirt, unless you're wearing it out for a night on the town or something, it's a toss. Your darkish green shirt, donate. Dark red and dark red checks are business casual, which is fine, but those colors are a bit too flashy. Generally shirts should be lighter than the tie or suit/sportscoat. If you're doing patterns, either make them very simple or small, or simple and large scale. Bright colors are a no go until you've mastered the basics. Start with white, blue in all sorts of patterns, and add in some skin tone appropriate variations like very light - pink, purple, green, yellow, and really these are pretty far down the list. the half zips were popular, but like 10ish years ago? maybe a bit less, but they're very "banana republic IT guy".

2. Resist the urge to go for the extremes, the bright colorful stuff, the dandy, the fun thing you saw on the cover of GQ, that thing your father always did, etc. Start with simple solid basics and work from there. Fit is king. Find your voice through the subtle details of shape, proportion, fabric texture, pattern, etc. Start there. Color is one of the last stages because it's so easy to go overboard. And if you have something that calls attention, then make everything else around it neutral and restrained so it doesn't go over the top. I've seen this happen over and over again with middle aged to older guys. They have a dated view of menswear from the 80's where it was big bold over the top or they have Astaire aspirations or something and they focus on all the crazy wild fun 'visual interest' stuff instead of getting the basics right.

3. ignore brands, focus on fit. You've listed off a stack of brands like they're a high and low list and will earn you credibility with the community. is "Brooks Brothers, Loro Piana weather system" supposed to help me? How about a fit picture so I know if it even makes sense? Learn about fabric, fit, construction (it's overrated IMO), and what works for you. Don't get so hung up on this or that brand and having the 'right' ones. Learn to understand if an item is right for you, and then figure out if it's worth the asking price. I have a total mixed bag of low to high end brands and mix them fairly consistently. Brands imply something, but if you have your own voice, that's what'll come through. Guys who really know their own taste just go MTM/Bespoke. They don't bother with brand this or that, just the styling. Get to know your tailor (find a good one) and tailor things if necessary. Of course, don't buy it if it doesn't work, but within reason. A tailor will take a $20 shirt and charge you $25 and you're left with a $200 MTM looking shirt.

4. Find what really works for you, not what you see or like or want to try. Don't waste time, money, and energy on the excess stuff early on. Focus on the core elements and learn your body shape, style preferences, realistic needs, etc. So for example, do you need white linen pants? does a light bottom and dark top work for your frame? Think more about cuff size, lapel width and pant length. Don't focus on pocket squares just yet, or colorful socks. Those are the excesses that brighten up a solid foundation. Keep it simple and solid. Your priorities should be on fit and solid basic pieces that you'll get a lot of use out of. Start there.

Listen to The Man
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtbaker22 View Post

I don't really want to talk about fit in this thread, just content of the wardrobe, if that's ok...

Content is basically meaningless without proper fit.
post #19 of 31
I think I understand his point, which is that he's rather try to get a reliable list of all the "required" pieces forr a wardrobe, meaning he's asking us to sort through his stuff and tell him what to remove or add to have a well rounded basic functional wardrobe, without getting too hung up (so to speak. get it, because they're clothes, and you hang them up!) on how this or that item fit him, which of course we all totally care about because that's really the basics. I do understand, because even if it's well fitting, if it's not the right item and it doesn't coordinate with others, etc then it's moot.

OP, everyone will have a different opinion about "must have's", because it depends on your situation and preferences. Given that you're (might be) new at this, the short answer is you should start with some really really simple basics like navy/charcoal suit, navy sportscoat, pants in shades of brown/grey/navy, and shoes in black/brown, etc. The rest will come down to what you need for your life circumstances (formality of office, casual life, local weather, skintones, etc) and we can't help you there. My advice is google 'wardrobe basics' or buy a couple of those recommended mens styleing books, or find a couple of posters here on the site whose style you like and copy. Look at what you really like with your own wardrobe and do more of that, and if something never gets used, then toss it and don't get more of it, etc. It's a process, not just a checklist.
post #20 of 31
post #21 of 31

A few other points to highlight: 
A well made suit is a must but it can be ruined quickly with poor shoes and accessories.

I would invest a bit in upgrading you shoes as mentioned before

Also what sort of ties do you have?  If your upgrading ties have changed with lapels in size and you might need to modify your collection.

post #22 of 31
The thread might have been abandoned, but it's worth adding a few bits of advice. Non-dated items can only be assessed by how they fit. Currently there are enough patterns. Fabric variety seems too limited to wool and cotton. Despite what a few people have suggested, a navy blue blazer is unnecessary and flannel pants might be too warm for the local climate.
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant View Post

Despite what a few people have suggested, a navy blue blazer is unnecessary .

OJFC. Are we just being contrarian here? Navy blazer is essential.
post #24 of 31
With the metal buttons, no. Too old-fashioned for many situations.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant View Post

With the metal buttons, no. Too old-fashioned for many situations.

Or sportcoat. Same f'ing thing. I don't have any gold button jackets in my collection, but I use the words interchangeably. Need a jacket in a casual weave dark blue wool fabric. biggrin.gif Patch or flap pockets, don't really care. There, said it right.
post #26 of 31
Navy blazer does not have to have metal buttons. As long as it is navy, wool and clearly not an orphaned suit jacket, it will do. But one of these is pretty damn essential, however it is put together. I've never encountered a situation in my life where having non-metal buttons would be necessary to avoid being seen as too old fashioned and largely believe that the button choice comes down to personal preference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant View Post

Fabric variety seems too limited to wool and cotton...flannel pants might be too warm for the local climate.

Wool and cotton are pretty much the main fabrics one would have in one's wardrobe. Maybe linen, but I'm not sure how a wardrobe or wool and cotton is too limited.

Re: the flannel trousers, climate is relevant and tropical weight wool or Fresco may be more versatile, but I'd be surprised if a lighter weight flannel would be too warm for fall / winter. 14 ounce flannel may be a bit much but something closer to 11 ounces probably would still work in even a moderate winter. In most climates, one still benefits IMO from having some sort of seasonal variation in one's trouser fabrics.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

OJFC. Are we just being contrarian here? Navy blazer is essential.

Seriously. I'm amazed that consultant stays in business.
post #28 of 31
It's the tech industry. The traditional-looking blue blazer would be odd there.

Also, there are fabrics like cashmere, camel, linen, and silk. Probably at least one of the jackets should have some of that blended with wool.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant View Post

It's the tech industry. The traditional-looking blue blazer would be odd there.

Sigh.

He's already mentioned that he's not an engineer/programmer type. He works in the strategic partnerships area and wants to wear SC's.
post #30 of 31
Missed that. Sportcoats okay either way. Not enough information to say whether his professional circle includes people who wear or expect rather traditional dress.
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