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What do you want done with your wardrobe after you're gone?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

As a vintage clothing aficionado I'm instructing my survivors to donate or consign the better pieces they don't want themselves.

 

I've asked a few friends about this and most of them haven't given it a second thought.

 

Please tell me I'm not the only one.

 

 

post #2 of 15
Im going to have my wife charge admission.
post #3 of 15
I will instruct my next of kin to bury me with my bespoke...
post #4 of 15

incinerate them with my dead body to make sure i've something I like to wear in heaven or hell. Hopefully a personal wardrobe is allowed:bigstar:

post #5 of 15
I have instructed my next of kin to liquidate it on LuxeSwap
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

I have instructed my next of kin to liquidate it on LuxeSwap

I hope I last longer than you. biggrin.gif
post #7 of 15
Anything they like, when \I have no further use I also have no further interest.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

My wife is 21 years younger so she'll most likely have this task so I asked her what she was going to do.

 

She said that her first pool boy would probably be a 42 Reg.

 

I can die happy...I guess.

post #9 of 15
I recently went through this with my family. It can be an emotional burden when surviving family members feel the need to keep and care for personal items unless they have a true interest in them. I don't want anyone to feel obligated to keep something of mine unless they really want it. They know they can donate or consign anything they don't want. We have written instructions on how all items should be divided. It makes it easy for everyone.
post #10 of 15

I'm passing everything down to my family when I pass on. Like hell is someone else wearing my clothes...

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purplelabel View Post
 

I'm passing everything down to my family when I pass on. Like hell is someone else wearing my clothes...

 

I'm doing this as well with a nephew who's asked for all my father's things.

 

My oldest son (24) has ZERO interest and the youngest (15 mos) who has yet to declare, naturally have right of first and second refusal on anything else.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post

My wife is 21 years younger so she'll most likely have this task so I asked her what she was going to do.

She said that her first pool boy would probably be a 42 Reg.

I can die happy...I guess.

Your wife is way cool.
post #13 of 15
Probably have my wife give them to charity and take a hefty tax write-off. There is no one in my family, immediate or extended, on whom my duds would be a good fit.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

I recently went through this with my family. It can be an emotional burden when surviving family members feel the need to keep and care for personal items unless they have a true interest in them. I don't want anyone to feel obligated to keep something of mine unless they really want it. They know they can donate or consign anything they don't want. We have written instructions on how all items should be divided. It makes it easy for everyone.

^This. My grandfather, still very healthy at 95, did this. He dressed well his entire and gave away anything that anyone wanted. By the time he died, he had handled most of it and had few things. He gave specific instructions on what to do with it (basically take anything you like, donate the rest to the following charities...). He even specified which auction house should take care of the remaining things in his house. We still talk about how easy it was and how much we appreciated it. It took one afternoon to do and wasn't painful in the slightest. I intend on following his example.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HansderHund View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

I recently went through this with my family. It can be an emotional burden when surviving family members feel the need to keep and care for personal items unless they have a true interest in them. I don't want anyone to feel obligated to keep something of mine unless they really want it. They know they can donate or consign anything they don't want. We have written instructions on how all items should be divided. It makes it easy for everyone.

^This. My grandfather, still very healthy at 95, did this. He dressed well his entire and gave away anything that anyone wanted. By the time he died, he had handled most of it and had few things. He gave specific instructions on what to do with it (basically take anything you like, donate the rest to the following charities...). He even specified which auction house should take care of the remaining things in his house. We still talk about how easy it was and how much we appreciated it. It took one afternoon to do and wasn't painful in the slightest. I intend on following his example.

 

 

As it should be.

 

My father gave me his Constellation and my older brother his old Hamilton 992B pocket watch and switch keys from his younger days on the Santa Fe in person right before he died and left instructions with my mother for all his wardrobe items that he knew we'd want, the rest went to consignment. 

 

Damn shame too, he had a closet full of classic American makers from the 60's to the 90's but he was a 46L and I'm 42 R; you do the math.                                                                                                                                                

 

Gave most of his library and papers to a local seminary but I kept one of his diaries from his early days as a newly minted minister in a small TX town.

 

I keep it to remind myself how much he did on far less and how graciously he did it.

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