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Interview Attire Question - Page 2

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post
 

you will want to be immaculately groomed, leaving no visual distractions. so your posture, and ability to communicate will be commanding the attention. 

   what to wear if not a "Suit"  , - it's really hard to fail at wearing tweed. in colder weather, brown cords and a tweed with brown shoes will come across as well put together, but not trying too hard. 

 

Sorry Size 38R, but while your grooming advice is fine, your clothing advice - as usual - is not. I love tweed and I have it in all forms, but tweed is not interview material. Neither is cord. Unless you are going for a job as a gamekeeper... While you are telling the OP to avoid 'visual distractions', which is great, you've followed this by outlining about the most non-standard, i.e. visually distracting, interview outfit possible. Your (rather random) suggestions of members to look for don't really work either, however much you or I may like the way they dress, because they all dress rather differently and certainly not for a conventional business interview context.

 

To the OP, it's really very simple - unless you are going for a job in some kind of creative field - as others have already said:

 

1. Navy or grey suit;

2. Light blue or white shirt with a collar that fits you;

3. Sober (read: boring) tie;

4. Socks the same colour as the suit;

4. Dark brown or black shoes, polished.

 

You do not want to mess about with trying to appear anything other than professional in interviews.

post #17 of 26
I'd say that if you're contemplating a jacket, then a suit would be perfectly acceptable, if not preferred, in this case. The advice above about what type of suit is spot on.

If a suit isn't possible (cost, use, etc.), then I'd go with the grey trouser/navy jacket suggestion above.
post #18 of 26

 f.m -and as usual, you have posted nonsense,  have you ever hired staff in a business environment? 

  i have, and still do.-  and ALWAYS get the job. when being interviewed.  the o.p. is asking for suggestions to gain a competetive edge. -  in an industry where suits are not necesarily required.  so wearing a suit is a moot point, and a fail if bought just for the interview and fits poorly. hence my recommending VERY neat casual CM. with the focus on personal grooming,posture, and communicative abilities.   the applicant should represent himself as calm, and confident in every way, and what they wear, as most of us know, makes or breaks a first impression.

so a blue or grey suit if you are the last guy to walk in?? you better be damn interesting.

 

 

had this style in mind....

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 100


Note how well the model above is groomed. this is the key,and how well your clothes fit. more than what you are wearing.

so long as you don't wear a poly, cheap, poorly fitted suit. or dress like dracula. :nest: (right, monkey?)


Edited by size 38R - 1/13/14 at 6:22am
post #19 of 26
Without knowing the field and where the op is at, nobody can really give much advice.

I've interviewed for a lot of programming jobs over the last dozen years and worn my blazer once. It was usually a khaki colored trouser and blue button down. At my current job, a tie wouldn't have gotten me in the door.

Of course this is very cultural. Portland is about the sloppiest place there is.
post #20 of 26
post #21 of 26

38r, you're very confident, and you have a very strong sense of personal style. The OP isn't there yet. Advice that requires one to be very confident (ie, wear something unusual, like a well-put-together tweed rig) and very stylish to pull off (to be able to look at the intricately coordinated stuff eazye, GmmCL, and Spoo put together, and interpolate elements from it), while well-intentioned and more sensible than "No. For interview, you wear this. No other choices," is ultimately a little unhelpful.

 

I think a lot of internet advice about what to wear for job interviews is A) aimed at interviews in a very conservative, suit-wearing environment, and B) more based on the internet orthodoxy on what to wear for a job interview than anything else, so I agree with a lot of what you're saying. "Neat, casual CM" is a good way of putting it, but I think the "path of least resistance" for that is chinos or gray trousers, a plain light blue or white shirt, and either a brown cord or navy blazer. Those have the great advantage of being so ubiquitous that they don't draw much attention to themselves, while an elegant tweed rig might. There are even interview contexts where I think a suit that suggests one is trying rather hard isn't such a bad idea -- if you want to send the message that you're serious, diligent, but possibly a little uptight. That last note can be counteracted through non-clothing cues.

 

All that said, last time I had to prepare for something like an interview (an in-class pitch, so not quite an interview and not quite the real world,) I wore a tweed jacket, silk square, open-collar shirt, dark jeans, and chelsea boots -- because it was comfortable for me, and right for the environment.

post #22 of 26

^^  Wow!   I agree with your whole post! omg.   :lol:           i only try to offer help with each o.p's question.  this one said he did not require a suit, but wanted to look the best prepared.  all the advice on this thread has been great.  i can only hope he posts the results of his interview.  it would be nice to know what he went with, and how it was recieved.

 

-and thanks for seeing my point. and the compliment.:embar:

post #23 of 26
With respect to black trousers / jackets, there are a couple of issues. The first is that black looks very severe during the day which is why you generally see it worn at night if at all (e.g. tuxedo). There are also fewer shirt and tie combinations that look good. Another issue is that black is a very formal color and thus does not make as much sense in an odd trouser or odd jacket context. If you must wear a black odd jacket, at least wear it with light grey trousers to provide a decent color contrast between jacket and trouser (which you should generally have anytime you are not wearing a suit) and stick to wearing the thing at night. I can't imagine any use for black odd trousers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post


To the OP, it's really very simple - unless you are going for a job in some kind of creative field - as others have already said:

1. Navy or grey suit;
2. Light blue or white shirt with a collar that fits you;
3. Sober (read: boring) tie;
4. Socks the same colour as the suit;
4. Dark brown or black shoes, polished.

You do not want to mess about with trying to appear anything other than professional in interviews.

Quoted for emphasis. I've interviewed and received offers from a number of places with dress codes ranging from business casual to business formal. Even if you're not going to be wearing a suit on a daily basis (or ever) in your job, it still makes sense in most cases to wear one for an interview. OP, you mentioned that a suit is not required for this interview but not required and not recommended are very different things. You probably have a sense of how "not required" should be interpreted that is better than ours, so I'd trust your instinct on this while keeping in mind the possibility that wearing a suit could still be a good thing. If you're going to dress more casually, the blazer with grey trousers (or even the right pair of dressier khakis) is the best option. It's forgettable and ubiquitous which is exactly what you want your interview attire to be. I do not recommend the tweed and corduroy combination; it will stand out and not in a good way. I love tweed myself but it is not something I would even think about wearing to an interview.
post #24 of 26

I had an interview for one of the largest companies in my area recently, - i wore a black pinstripe suit, the interview was for a way to boost my own business through merging interests. the guy asked me what's the deal with wearing a full suit?  , as we had met before when i was wearing my regular style. this experience prompted my earlier post. i regretted not wearing cords and tweed.

felt like i made an "amatuer move" wearing a suit. like visually begging. not sure really, just felt like a mistake.     - oh, the meeting went well though. take what you want from the story.

that's the reason why i suggested a neat CM fit.  and yes it can be hard to do, but hey, that's what we are here to help with.  right?  :D  

 

so i guess, consider what the interviewer will be wearing???   the guy on the day was wearing grey pants and a camelhair s/c.  so i kind of felt silly dressed to the max.

post #25 of 26
^ I do think that it is safer to be a bit overdressed than a bit underdressed when you are the interviewee. Good grooming is always essential as is having your clothes look neat. The rules on exact attire may vary if you are interviewing with Goldman Sachs vs. some tech startup in California where an employee tucking an OCBD into his khakis qualifies as dressed up, but the degree to which one's interview attire should get more casual occurs at a much slower rate than the degree to which the dress code at the place one is interviewing at gets more casual. When you are hiring people yourself, you can of course wear whatever the hell you want.

While I disagree with some of your style choices and a fair amount of your advice, I do get that you have your own sense of style and seem to have enough confidence to make it work for you and that socially, confidence tends to matter more than the exact details of what you are wearing. Someone else making a somewhat unorthodox choice might doubt what they are doing (especially if they want in with cords and tweed and see the prior interviewee walk out in a suit) and that could adversely affect one's performance in an interview. This is one of the reasons why most of us suggest the safe choice when discussing interview attire.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post
 

^^  Wow!   I agree with your whole post! omg.   :lol:         

We've had our disagreements, but I'm pretty sure that our biggest differences are in terms of shirt wardrobes and quotes in our sigs. I'd buy you a beer.

 

Archibaldleach, I think you have a good point when you say that "the degree to which one's interview attire should get more casual occurs at a much slower rate than the degree to which the dress code at the place one is interviewing at gets more casual." That's a very nice way of putting it, I think -- though of course, I'm sure opinions will vary as to how fast "much slower" is. :)

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