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post #9451 of 37396

There are probably few fields where books matter, mostly in the humanities, say English or History. Not in the natural sciences or social sciences.

 

I've lost track of who are academics besides you two, unbelraggazo and Academic2. I'm not surprised that there are so few here on Style Forum. Academics, if they dress carefully at all, seem to be OCBD, possibly a sportscoat, and chinos (that would be dressy). Very few ties; almost no pocket squares. And very badly fitting clothes. OCBD and jeans is more common.

 

I started dressing more carefully in part to introduce formality into my relation to students who, in the US, seem to be assuming much more familiarity with me as a working assumption. Too many "hey dude" emails! Still, I do standout on campus, if only for well-tailored clothes and a square. At this point, I'm taking it as a mission to get my colleagues to take things a bit more seriously: one occupies a certain position that I think in the end is better served by more formality in dress.

post #9452 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingson View Post


@SeaJen, I have probably asked before, but forgotten you answer, what field are you in?

The closest to writing a book I've come is a chapter in an edited volume - otherwise it's just journal articles that counts for me as well, unfortunately. I like books as they allow you to be a little more broad on the topic you cover and not just cram everything into 5000 words and few tables/figure

 

Engineered systems, although I have moved into socio-technical systems in the last few years.

post #9453 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 

There are probably few fields where books matter, mostly in the humanities, say English or History. Not in the natural sciences or social sciences.

 

I've lost track of who are academics besides you two, unbelraggazo and Academic2. I'm not surprised that there are so few here on Style Forum. Academics, if they dress carefully at all, seem to be OCBD, possibly a sportscoat, and chinos (that would be dressy). Very few ties; almost no pocket squares. And very badly fitting clothes. OCBD and jeans is more common.

 

I started dressing more carefully in part to introduce formality into my relation to students who, in the US, seem to be assuming much more familiarity with me as a working assumption. Too many "hey dude" emails! Still, I do standout on campus, if only for well-tailored clothes and a square. At this point, I'm taking it as a mission to get my colleagues to take things a bit more seriously: one occupies a certain position that I think in the end is better served by more formality in dress.

Social distance is always tricky. I sense that it is more of a problem in the US than elsewhere. 

post #9454 of 37396

:lurk:


Edited by The Noodles - 7/31/14 at 11:09am
post #9455 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaJen View Post
 

Social distance is always tricky. I sense that it is more of a problem in the US than elsewhere. 


Yes...I don't think this is nearly as much of a problem in Germany, where I've spent some time. But that system is also rather medieval.

 

Some of it is tied to entitlement. People in the US pay a lot for an education with tuition now nearly $50,000 in some places. Parents and students thinks this earns them automatically good grades...it's a puzzling thing.

post #9456 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

Still, I do standout on campus, if only for well-tailored clothes and a square. At this point, I'm taking it as a mission to get my colleagues to take things a bit more seriously: one occupies a certain position that I think in the end is better served by more formality in dress.

+1 to sticking out at my department (and most likely on campus as well). But one of the nice side effects of being a fully tenured professor is that I can dress pretty much as I want. And if someone comments on it I can always play the "quirky professor" card - there are certainly enough of them on campus so one more won't make a difference to anyone biggrin.gif
post #9457 of 37396
Quote:

Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

[...]

 

I started dressing more carefully in part to introduce formality into my relation to students who, in the US, seem to be assuming much more familiarity with me as a working assumption. [...]

 

Yes.  Faculty members are role models for students, not just sources of information.  If we want students to take the intellectual life seriously (and the consequences to civilization if they do not aren’t trivial) we need to comport ourselves in a manner that projects our seriousness of purpose and the dignity of the profession.   Of course that’s not limited to dress, but it does include it.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #9458 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 


Yes...I don't think this is nearly as much of a problem in Germany, where I've spent some time. But that system is also rather medieval.

 

Some of it is tied to entitlement. People in the US pay a lot for an education with tuition now nearly $50,000 in some places. Parents and students thinks this earns them automatically good grades...it's a puzzling thing.

Indeed. While we (the institution) 'sell' an education, the student believes he is buying a diploma. The differences reflect the value we respectively attribute to each.

post #9459 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post
 

 

Speaking of formalities, despite being in the U.S. for 20 plus years, I still have a hard time calling older (like 20 years older and up) people by their first name. It's probably my Korean background where they are respectful in the way they act, speak, etc if they're older than you. I usually start with Mr. Smith and let them say it is okay to call me by their first names.

I think it is a very reasonable assumption that my student's don't make: formal address, at least initially, is a sign of respect.

 

I don't care so much being addressed as "Prof" or "Dr" and in the old days (e.g. 3 years ago), I asked them to address me by my first name; but I realized that this ready informality is often a sign of something less than seriousness on their part. I don't serve them well by encouraging it. So, I've become more formal about it as a way of instilling in them that there are divisions and formal relations in life. One does not present well by ignoring them.

 

Recently a new student asked me what days my classes will be held on (addressing me by my first name in an email). Um...part of life is making the right impression so how did this go for you? [Hint: you can find this information yourself].

post #9460 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingson View Post


+1 to sticking out at my department (and most likely on campus as well). But one of the nice side effects of being a fully tenured professor is that I can dress pretty much as I want. And if someone comments on it I can always play the "quirky professor" card - there are certainly enough of them on campus so one more won't make a difference to anyone biggrin.gif

That's a good quirky...not the slovenly, unkempt, unshaved, pipe quirky!

 

Still, aside from a pocket square, I am puzzled that a coat and tie should be seen by colleagues as quirky. The state we've come to. [God, I'm sounding like an old man!]

post #9461 of 37396

Just start each course with a little Sidney Poitier film clip and they will get it....

post #9462 of 37396
I will trade styfo poasts for neckties.
post #9463 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 

I think it is a very reasonable assumption that my student's don't make: formal address, at least initially, is a sign of respect.

 

I don't care so much being addressed as "Prof" or "Dr" and in the old days (e.g. 3 years ago), I asked them to address me by my first name; but I realized that this ready informality is often a sign of something less than seriousness on their part. I don't serve them well by encouraging it. So, I've become more formal about it as a way of instilling in them that there are divisions and formal relations in life. One does not present well by ignoring them.

 

Recently a new student asked me what days my classes will be held on (addressing me by my first name in an email). Um...part of life is making the right impression so how did this go for you? [Hint: you can find this information yourself].

Interesting. 

I manage a team of accountants who are under 30 years old (I am 32 :brick:). Anyhow, I am a very easy going guy and easy to get along with. And I even joke with them and even play pranks on them. But once I put on my manager hat, they know it and the horse playing :deadhorse: stops. It is a fine line that managers have to walk, or in you all's case as professors, in order to keep the workplace, or classrooms, professional. With that, I like to say that there is an employee on vacation and I just put tape underneath his mouse, put his desk phone ringer volume all the way up, and put tape over his phone (the talking end). :nodding:

post #9464 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

I will trade styfo poasts for neckties.


I think you could trade poasts for Formosas, given how much you've got in the bank!

post #9465 of 37396

:lurk:


Edited by The Noodles - 7/31/14 at 11:48am
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