or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 602

post #9016 of 37395
Quote:
Hope you were wearing an apron to deflect splatter! 

 

Oh yes, forgot to mention the Thom Browne apron.

post #9017 of 37395
@Coxsackie what? No fresh tomatoes?!
post #9018 of 37395

Fresh tomatoes are the devil's work. Unless of course one is serving insalata caprese as the first course.


 

Ingredients for the gremolata (Click to show)

 

post #9019 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

Fresh tomatoes are the devil's work. Unless of course one is serving insalata caprese as the first course.


 

Ingredients for the gremolata (Click to show)

 

 

Looking good! Are you going to make the gremolata with anchovies? And will you serve your ossi bucchi with the traditional risotto alla milanese?

(Apologies, but once the subject is food or cooking, I can't stop....)

post #9020 of 37395

Anchovies have of course already been added, but to the main sugo. Last few times, I also incorporated anchovy in the gremolata, but on this occasion I have decided to eschew that option.

 

TBH I don't know how to prepare risotto alla milanese. Often osso buco is served with a creamy potato mash or polenta. I personally prefer it with cous-cous, which of course is just polenta alla arrabiata. (I'm treading unfamiliar ground here with Italian grammar, so go easy on me. Also please excuse the pretentious italics.)

 

I am also just slightly ashamed to admit that tonight's cous-cous comes ready-made, courtesy of Ainsley Marriott. However it will be hydrated to perfection by my good self.

post #9021 of 37395

Risotto or not, sounds like you'll be having a wonderful dinner tonight! BTW, Italian food is my thing, especially northern and from Emilia-Romagna, so if you're interested in a recipe for risotto alla milanese, shoot me a PM (so this thread can get back on topic...)

post #9022 of 37395
Elio

Post it!
post #9023 of 37395

OK, I'll finish up. Spoilered, as is appropriate for such OT trivia.

 

Final touches and presentation of the finished dish. (Click to show)

Gremolata has been added to the pan -

 

 

Four-leaf side salad -

 

 

Salad and cous-cous -

 

 

White wine for the sugo. But a fine Barossa Valley red to accompany the actual meal -

 

 

Tuck in, folks!

 

post #9024 of 37395

Looks yummy, Cox!

 

OK, for those who are interested, here is my recipe for risotto alla milanese:


 

Recipe for Risotto alla Milanese (Click to show)

Risotto alla Milanese

This is not your typical light, Mediterranean fare. This is hearty comfort food for cold Lombardian winter nights.
As with all Italian food, the recipe is rather simple but the quality of the ingredients is of utmost importance. Hence, use carnaroli rice instead of the more common arborio. Use good quality dry wine and saffron, the best is from the Abruzzi region or from Sardinia. (Less authentic: from La Mancha in Spain). And of course, the best parmesan cheese that you can get, Parmigiano-Reggiano DOC. Grate it only just before use, so it won't loose its lovely aroma.
The stock should be freshly made from good beef shank.


ingredients for 6 persons

400 g carnaroli rice
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 glass of dry white wine
50 g bone marrow
100 g butter
20 threads of saffron
1.5 l unsalted beef stock
100 g parmigiano reggiano
salt if needed

 

preparation

Soak the saffron in a bit of broth or the wine.
Keep your broth simmering on the stove.
Place pan with heavy bottom on medium heat.
Add a generous knob of butter to pan.
Add rice, onion and chopped bone marrow.
Stir and toast for a minute or two without letting rice or onion brown. This toasting stage is essential for the rice to be able to absorb the liquid.
Add the white wine. Stir and let evaporate.
Turn down the heat to low and add a couple of ladles of broth. Add the saffron and the soaking liquid.
Stir gently and add another ladle or two of broth when the rice gets dry. Repeat this process until the rice has the right all dente consistency. This should take about 15 to 20 minutes. At this stage, the risotto should still be rather wet.
Turn off the heat, add in the remaining butter and the grated cheese and stir. Taste and add salt if necessary (most likely not needed).
Let the covered pan sit for 3 more minutes or so before serving. The risotto should now be creamy and shiny. It should not be a thick paste, but remain a bit runny, so it won't be too heavy on the stomach.
Sprinkle a few threads of saffron on top as garnish and serve.

 

(Some contemporary recipes say that you can add all the broth at once, and only need to stir towards the end. This shortcut will not give you the desired smooth consistency, because the starches will not be released as in the traditional method)


Edited by EliodA - 7/19/14 at 4:53am
post #9025 of 37395

I have no idea where I would source bone marrow from. Can this be purchased from a butcher?

post #9026 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

I have no idea where I would source bone marrow from. Can this be purchased from a butcher?

Yes, probably. If not, you can scoop some out of the veal shanks that you use for your osso bucco. Or leave it out, your risotto will already be rich enough.
post #9027 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliodA View Post


Yes, probably. If not, you can scoop some out of the veal shanks that you use for your osso bucco. Or leave it out, your risotto will already be rich enough.


I suppose it's not surprising that many of the people who gravitate to the aesthetics of presentation in clothing should also have an interest in food.  Before I started spending my "discretionary" (read: all of) my income on clothing, it was kitchen knives and cookware.  EliodA, your recipe for risotto alla milanese sounds delicious.  Do you ever finish with just a bit of Alba truffle? 

post #9028 of 37395

Woah. This thread has recipes now? I need to start paying more attention!


I've been working too much to cook lately, which is really sad. I might set aside some time to try one of the recipes posted recently with friends.

post #9029 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post

Don't want to seem like I'm shilling for a brand here (no affiliation, and I only have one item of clothing from them), but is anybody in this thread as drawn to the Epaulet Factory Finds jackets as I am?  There's a lot of chat about them on the Epaulet thread but a lot of those guys are mainly SWD.  I see at least five fabrics that I would love to add to my fall/winter wardrobe, not including some of the gorgeous browns that are too close to stuff I've already got.  

In no particular order:

1. lovat blue plaid olive windowpane
2. heavyweight navy windowpane
3. midnight check Harris tweed
4. blue Danube marl
5. steel blue Harris tweed

Are any of you considering these or others? 

I ordered the steel blue. Just loved the color and don't have anything close in my winter wardrobe. At that price, I thought it was worth the risk of me not trying on prior to ordering.
post #9030 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post
 


I suppose it's not surprising that many of the people who gravitate to the aesthetics of presentation in clothing should also have an interest in food.  Before I started spending my "discretionary" (read: all of) my income on clothing, it was kitchen knives and cookware.  EliodA, your recipe for risotto alla milanese sounds delicious.  Do you ever finish with just a bit of Alba truffle? 

 

Ah, truffle... one of those luxurious delights that are no longer available to me, since moving to Jakarta. Maybe for the better, I shiver to think what they would cost here. The requisite bottle of Barolo as accompaniment will cost you here as much as a nice suit from Suit Supply :crazy:

Fortunately, it is possible to get dried funghi porcini here, with which you can make a tasty risotto as well.

As for your observation that people interested in clothing might also have an interest in good food, that may well be so. Are we not all Epicureans?

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/8137/what-did-you-eat-last-night-for-dinner

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe)