or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 289

post #4321 of 37396
I don't like the look of that linen blend fabric, Clags.

To me, a blue suit is a formal suit. Should be crisp and free of wrinkles. I'd prefer a blue fresco wool suiting to a blue wool-linen blend suiting fabric

I dunno, a wrinkled blue linen suit seems like a mutt to me.

I'd only consider linen for a tan or brown suit, which is more casual.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Linen wool blends are the holy grail. Look at the subtle texture of them (especially the first one. The second one skews towards linen)





post #4322 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

No. I rely on @kulata
for all my SoKo Sartorial Event News. He didn't give me the heads up this time though.
Saw it on my Tumblr feed and was thinking the Texan sartorialist in SKorea should be on top of thingz
post #4323 of 37396
Here's Vox's AFB fresco
Quote:
27d02d35f3f5f99234504638615bcdb4.jpg
post #4324 of 37396
Thread Starter 

Too formal for me. I want my suits to send two clear messages if I'm wearing them when I don't need to wear them.

 

a) I don't need to be wearing a suit

b) I'm not trying to look like a need to be wearing a suit

 

Thus I favor very clearly casual suits. And yet I don't want that to preclude wearing staple solid colors. So. Wool-linen.

post #4325 of 37396
Are you required to wear a suit for work? If I'm following correctly, you're saying that you try to offset the "square" image that a suit creates by having wrinkly fabric?
post #4326 of 37396
Thread Starter 

I've not been required to wear suits to work for some years and two jobs ago. And I've nothing against the square image.

 

It doesn't necessarily need to be wrinkly fabric. Just not very city. So countrified windowpane or tweed is right up my alley.

post #4327 of 37396
Also, some of the collars you wear don't mesh with that casual vibe you're going for.

I see a fair amount of wide spread collars in your wardrobe. To me, those are very formal and not great for wear with sportcoats or casual suits.

Narrower spread and button down collars would be more appropriate IMO
post #4328 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudals View Post

Let me how Kent Wang works out. Pix would be appreciated. smile.gif

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murlsquirl View Post


I'll PM you to make sure you don't miss them in the KW and WAYWRN threads.

 

I've got one Kent Wang MTM and will likely do another soon.  I'm very happy with the finished result, but I also did not need extensive alterations from the sample model.  I'm hesitant to recommend it to Noodles, though, because the internet/e-mail/pictures aspect of it requires knowledge of your general fit issues as part of the discussion with KW where you get his recommendations as well as a firm idea of what you want as a finished product.  Then there is the fact of how picky Noodles is regarding details, which leads me to think he needs to work with an actual tailor through the MTM process.

post #4329 of 37396
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

Also, some of the collars you wear don't mesh with that casual vibe you're going for.

I see a fair amount of wide spread collars in your wardrobe. To me, those are very formal and not great for wear with sportcoats or casual suits.

Narrower spread and button down collars would be more appropriate IMO

 

 

But they are great for my giant head. And I like clean lines, though not necessarily clean surfaces. I do agree that an oversized BD would be more appropriate for my look. Just not my taste.

post #4330 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

But they are great for my giant head. And I like clean lines, though not necessarily clean surfaces. I do agree that an oversized BD would be more appropriate for my look. Just not my taste.

I've a large, round face too, and find that mid spread fits my proportions better than wide spread. Wide spreads are better for long, narrow faces.

Also, this guy had a huge head and never wore wide spreads

https://www.google.com/search?q=cary+grant&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=84dKU7HUCI3FsASFhYCgBQ&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=799#imgdii=_
post #4331 of 37396
Thread Starter 

Smaller than mine. But I wore a less spread collar today. Generally like them less. 80% of my shirts have a spread collar with a raised collar band.

 

 

Edit: looking at it with my head cropped, I still like the wider spread more. Spent a bit thinking about why. I think I like the way in which the wider collar leads into the line of my shoulder. As I said, I like clean lines.

post #4332 of 37396
^ That collar seems like it fits your frame better. Also seems more appropriate for a sportcoat fit. To me, wide spread = city suit fit

Proportions would look even better without an enormous knot
post #4333 of 37396
I think this is a silk-linen blend
Quote:
omnom.jpg
post #4334 of 37396
They were all 40R.
My shirt was too thick. Sd orry guys. 0
post #4335 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post



I've got one Kent Wang MTM and will likely do another soon.  I'm very happy with the finished result, but I also did not need extensive alterations from the sample model.  I'm hesitant to recommend it to Noodles, though, because the internet/e-mail/pictures aspect of it requires knowledge of your general fit issues as part of the discussion with KW where you get his recommendations as well as a firm idea of what you want as a finished product.  Then there is the fact of how picky Noodles is regarding details, which leads me to think he needs to work with an actual tailor through the MTM process.

I figure between the help he would get in this thread and the advice from Aaron and/or Kent, it can be successful
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe)