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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2385

post #35761 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

The availability of European wines wasn't what I was talking about.

My point was that shops that specialize in those areas wouldn't really have a huge upcharge because a specific wine is from France or Italy. Everything is from there.

Plus, there are economies of scale that result, so the importation costs are less.

post #35762 of 37392

Gotcha. I agree, there are places where you can get imported wine at lesser prices, especially if they specialize. However you still aren't getting it for close to the price you would in Europe. There are simply too many comparable domestic (California) wines for less because they don't have to pay for what importers do to get it here. But hey, maybe you just like European wines better. Nothing wrong with that.

post #35763 of 37392
Will check some of those tailors and see how it goes
post #35764 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Gotcha. I agree, there are places where you can get imported wine at lesser prices, especially if they specialize. However you still aren't getting it for close to the price you would in Europe. There are simply too many comparable domestic (California) wines for less because they don't have to pay for what importers do to get it here. But hey, maybe you just like European wines better. Nothing wrong with that.

I am not so sure about this. Depends. North America is a powerful market, and very price conscious, so everyone, including Europeans, will be willing to drop margins to get to that kind of volume. French would care less, Italians more so. I say it depends, because wine of certain quality is naturally restricted in volume, so you just hit the rich market and charge whatever you can.

Also, excises play a big role in price, so booze can be more expensive in some European countries even if they produce it.

Here in Canada, Californian wine will be more expensive then Italian wine of similar quality. Go figure...
post #35765 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post


 excises play a big role in price, so booze can be more expensive in some European countries even if they produce it.

 

This is true in some cases but not generally I think. Of course this is only based on my personal experience but being a wine conscious person I've seen stuff that commands a good price in the U.S. sell for significantly less in Europe. Does it happen that some wines go for more in their country of origin than overseas? I'm sure it does, but I'm not sure how common it is. I remember a few years back some of our friends from U.K. would talk about hopping over the channel just to buy wine since it was so much cheaper in France. 

post #35766 of 37392

Cross-post from KW thread:

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post
 

Here's my latest KW suit.  The picture angle is exaggerating the buttoning point, but I do think it needs to come down another 0.5 - 1.0 cm.  I'll also talk with KW about cleaning up the backs of the sleeves.  As for the shoulder blades, the pattern cannot go any narrower, so I will always need to have my tailor clean that portion up.  I may decrease the length of the pants, but I tend to like them a little longer.

 

 

post #35767 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post
 

Cross-post from KW thread:

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post
 

Here's my latest KW suit.  The picture angle is exaggerating the buttoning point, but I do think it needs to come down another 0.5 - 1.0 cm.  I'll also talk with KW about cleaning up the backs of the sleeves.  As for the shoulder blades, the pattern cannot go any narrower, so I will always need to have my tailor clean that portion up.  I may decrease the length of the pants, but I tend to like them a little longer.

 

This looks great. I tend to prefer slightly more open quarters to increase the leg line, but I think that is a personal preference. 

post #35768 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2breformed View Post
 

 

This looks great. I tend to prefer slightly more open quarters to increase the leg line, but I think that is a personal preference. 

 

I do too.  I've asked KW if there is a modification for opening up the quarters a little bit. 

post #35769 of 37392

@jcmeyer - I know that you're already in Japan so I'm coming to this late, but I've been away in Japan for the past two weeks and so missed the discussion!

 

I've got a Word file with some thoughts on Japan that I'll try sending through to you via a PM shortly, so if you're checking SF, please let me know if you get it.

 

With regard to an itinerary, I'd spend more time in Tokyo and Kyoto, and less time in Osaka. Simply put, once you've spent time in Tokyo, Osaka is just another big city (although I know that people from Osaka would be absolutely furious to hear me say that!).

 

Tokyo is "the" city in Japan. It's a megalopolis that sucks in massive amounts of people, money, power, influence and all sorts of other things. If you're going to see one part of Japan, then this is it - it has age-old temples, brand-new skyscrapers, old gardens, new entertainment areas, amazing places to eat from cheap, street-side food to restaurants with three Michelin stars. In between all that are the suburbs where people actually live, which are typically filled with ugly houses and ramshackle apartment blocks on amazingly narrow streets, crammed cheek-by-jowl with small construction or manufacturing businesses.

 

Kyoto is the historical capital of Japan. Although a lot of it is regrettably new and ugly, there are still a lot - a lot - of old temples, shrines and other buildings. If you want to stay in a ryokan for a Japanese experience, you can do so quite cheaply or you can spend as much as you would for a suite at the Park Hyatt - there's a very wide variety of options. There's not much in central Kyoto. There is an historical district (Gion) on the east side and then, to the east and north-east of that, there are quite a few notable temples, including Kiyomizudera, which has a huge deck with fantastic views back over Kyoto. The walk through small, cobbled streets up towards Kiyomizudera is great, too. Yet another nice thing to do in eastern Kyoto is to have a walk along the Tetsugaku-no-michi, or Philosopher's Path. It runs from Ginkaku-ji to Nanzen-ji and Eikando.

 

Over in the north and north-west, you have Ryoan-ji and Kinkaku-ji. The former has a world-famous karesansui (dry stone garden), and nice gardens as well. The latter is covered in gold leaf. There are various other temples in that area, too and it can be nice to walk through the streets of Kyoto from one to another.

 

In the northern-central part of Kyoto is Katsura Rikyu, or Katsura Imperial Villa. This is a collection of large, low-set buildings set amongst beautiful, extensive gardens. The buildings are quite spectacular examples of traditional Japanese architecture in terms of the roofs, eaves, verandahs, painted screens and so on. The gardens include ponds, sculptured trees and bushes and at least one teahouse. It used to be a residence of the Imperial family.

 

Nara is a smaller, historical town about 30-45 minutes by train from Kyoto. Well worth a day-trip. See the Daibutsu (big Buddha) and have a look around Nara Great Park and the temples and pagodas near Shinobazu-no-ike (Shinobazu pond). Catching the Kintetsu line to Nara is both faster and more convenient than the Japan Rail (JR) line.

 

For places to eat, have a look at a couple of websites.

 

A great resource for finding places to eat in Japan is Tabelog. Tabelog is the Japanese version of Urbanspoon/Zomato and it has information on, and reviews of, many thousands of restaurants. It’s an absolutely fantastic resource.

 

http://tabelog.com/en/

 

If you’d like to splash out and try some Michelin-starred restaurants while you are in Tokyo, you could take a look at Andy Hayler’s food blog to see details for the restaurants:

 

http://www.andyhayler.com/restaurant-guide?country=124&city=Tokyo

 

You can change the settings to adjust the location and sort via cities, so if you want to see options in Kyoto, for example, you can do that, too.

 

Anyway, I hope that you're having a great time in Japan and that you're catching the tail-end of the cherry blossoms. I'll try sending the Word file through to you now.

 

post #35770 of 37392

Yo guys, where is everyone getting these sick thin rollnecks/turtlenecks? See them so much on instagram with suits, can anyone recommend me some brands that do it well?

post #35771 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdrizzy View Post

Yo guys, where is everyone getting these sick thin rollnecks/turtlenecks? See them so much on instagram with suits, can anyone recommend me some brands that do it well?

John Smedley is good and has nice online store.
post #35772 of 37392

Agreed, john smedley has really good merino v necks

post #35773 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

Agreed, john smedley has really good merino v necks

Nice! Thanks guys.

 

As for v necks, I have a hard time wearing v necks sweaters, what do you wear them with? Just a casual shirt, no tie?

post #35774 of 37392


James Bond wearing the John Smedley "bobby" merino v neck.

 

 

 

But I usually just wear it casually. Looks good on its own without a shirt(or wear an undershirt), more of a slouchy look

 

post #35775 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 


James Bond wearing the John Smedley "bobby" merino v neck.

 

 

 

 

But I usually just wear it casually. Looks good on its own without a shirt(or wear an undershirt), more of a slouchy look

Awesome, thanks for the examples!

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