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post #35506 of 37396

I mean of course you look better in one. You have actual trousers, a dress shirt, the pic is taken from a good angle; on the other youre wearing a t-shirt, jeans, head tilted weirdly, and looks like the picture is taken from an 8ft tall man.

 

(Not saying the canali is good, or even close to the Kiton, but it does make comparisons difficult when the pictures are so disparate)

post #35507 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

I mean of course you look better in one. You have actual trousers, a dress shirt, the pic is taken from a good angle; on the other youre wearing a t-shirt, jeans, head tilted weirdly, and looks like the picture is taken from an 8ft tall man.

(Not saying the canali is good, or even close to the Kiton, but it does make comparisons difficult when the pictures are so disparate)

Yea sorry. The Canali is long gone (before I had a tripod). I was only using for demonstrational purposes.
post #35508 of 37396
The canali looks to have really low armholes, which can emphasize how big it is (less mobility)
post #35509 of 37396
Also the illusion of a darker color makes it look sleeker and cleaner where a light jacket will not look the same. Again I also agree with VVV one is dressed properly and both are photographed at different angles.
post #35510 of 37396
That makes sense. Do any of you have that big of a variance in shoulder widths among your jackets (2")?
post #35511 of 37396

I had a southwhick jacket that was supposedly 17", but fit me, and I normally wear size 40. My Formosas are somewhere around ~19 and my KWs are ~18 or so , so I do get some pretty big variances too.


Edited by venividivicibj - 3/23/16 at 2:49pm
post #35512 of 37396
I wouldn't worry to much about measured variances. Some of my really soft shoulders are narrower and some of my more structured jackets are wider. It all depends on the style of the jacket. As long as it fits that's the most important.
post #35513 of 37396

I don't want to pretend like I know what I'm talking about, but when you're looking at  a measurement that draws a straight line between the seams of the armholes, I think you should expect about that much variance from one maker to another to account for construction techniques and styles. From what I've read--and I'm sure I'm being both over- and under-inclusive--factors that might affect the measurement include: the size and shape of the armscye, the construction and style of the sleeve head and shoulder, whether back or front drape is part of the overall style, and even the construction of the chest. There's a lot going on between the fabric and lining, and we're dealing with something that's actually three dimensional, so the straight line measurement across the back is only but so useful when you're looking at different makers.


Edited by Mr. Six - 3/23/16 at 4:02pm
post #35514 of 37396
All very helpful thoughts thank you. I've avoided wider measuring shoulders like the plague. Time to rethink things.

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post #35515 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdrizzy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

Have you considered Solaro?  

Solaro is awesome, but I can't order cut lengths from them can I?

 

Kent Wang sources Harrisons (which now owns Smiths-  Solaro is in the 'Luxury Flannels' book).  The Smiths is the one I'd go for (by reputation). 

post #35516 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

Kent Wang sources Harrisons (which now owns Smiths-  Solaro is in the 'Luxury Flannels' book).  The Smiths is the one I'd go for (by reputation). 

Is Solaro really a summer fabric, from a practical perspective? If I recall, the Smiths version is about 13 oz?

Not saying it isn't summery, as I've no experience (yet), but I'd be curious to know if it suits summer most out of tradition than anything else.
post #35517 of 37396
Cotton wears cooler than wool (and smiths has a 13-14 oz wool solaro which is... pretty self defeating, but if you like the color...). That said, the caccioppoli version is 9-10 oz I think
post #35518 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post

Is Solaro really a summer fabric, from a practical perspective? If I recall, the Smiths version is about 13 oz?

Not saying it isn't summery, as I've no experience (yet), but I'd be curious to know if it suits summer most out of tradition than anything else.

From a practical perspective, absolutely not. Some lighter weight cotton versions are probably okay, but really no different than other comparable cottons. It's more of a tradition thing.
post #35519 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post
 
Quote:
 
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

Kent Wang sources Harrisons (which now owns Smiths-  Solaro is in the 'Luxury Flannels' book).  The Smiths is the one I'd go for (by reputation). 

Is Solaro really a summer fabric, from a practical perspective? If I recall, the Smiths version is about 13 oz?

Not saying it isn't summery, as I've no experience (yet), but I'd be curious to know if it suits summer most out of tradition than anything else.

 

 

yes, there's a tradition IIRC British expats believed that having red on the underside of their garments would repel heat, because native garments were worn that way.  Sounds odd to me.

 

  imo the cut of a Summer suit is as important as the cloth.  It should be loose fitting, with slightly shorter, and slightly  wider-than-usual legs and sleeves.  Increase the depth of the vents too.  Half or buggy lining, but don't forgo structure because structure helps the cloth to hang away from the body. 

post #35520 of 37396
Interesting, thanks for the opinions, gents. It's definitely a fabric I'm very intrigued by, and will have a suit made up from it at a point, practicality be damned. Pretty easy to make use of it when there's this wonderful thing called central AC.

Pliny, very interesting points regarding cut, especially the legs/sleeves/vent depth.
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