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post #34666 of 37396
I'm working towards a PhD because I am a huge dork that would love to teach and do research for the next 50 years. Here's hoping the glut of PhDs seeking professorships in my field clears out a bit by the time I finish

Haven't come across too many insufferable individuals so far, but then again I'm a public uni guy
post #34667 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuP View Post

Noodles I have some tax questions....

Ask away @GuP. I get the damn tax questions all the time. I would use PM though.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

there are different kinds of CPAs....

Thank you for knowing! I hate it when people throw random tax questions at me when in fact I am a financial/IT CPA. Shoot, I do my taxes using turbo tax! Shoot, even my tax attorney used turbo tax!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post


If I ever get an MBA, I promise you I will never put it after my name willingly. I don't put JD or Esq. after it now, so there's no way in hell I'd do it with an MBA. Plus I majored in finance and took pretty much all the other business classes as an undergraduate, so an MBA is pretty much pointless (I did the whole going out 5 nights a week thing already in grad school; also, nothing like beer at lunch with friends between classes).

Don't "waist" your money on a MBA program. I saw how useless it was long ago. I have seen poor dudes from Ivy League schools who have it but they're not doing much better. Most of the ones that I saw were washed ups from Wall St.

 

As far as Esq. goes, I thought that was fine, is it not?

post #34668 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

As far as Esq. goes, I thought that was fine, is it not?

It's fine (but unnecessary) in professional settings, though I don't mind it on business cards (social cards with contact information on the other hand...). If you're representing clients, people already know that you went to law school and are a member of the bar. It's grating when people use it in social settings, though. I know a lot of smart and high quality lawyers who I respect; most of them don't treat graduating from law school as this amazing achievement to be pretentious about. They just focus on being good at what they do. Law school really isn't that hard anyway.
post #34669 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post


It's fine (but unnecessary) in professional settings, though I don't mind it on business cards (social cards with contact information on the other hand...). If you're representing clients, people already know that you went to law school and are a member of the bar. It's grating when people use it in social settings, though. I know a lot of smart and high quality lawyers who I respect; most of them don't treat graduating from law school as this amazing achievement to be pretentious about. They just focus on being good at what they do. Law school really isn't that hard anyway.

Easy for you to say!

 

Now, it's a bit of a different story in accounting. There are accountants who are nothing but book keepers. They may even have a masters in accounting but they're just book keepers. Then there are the CPAs. And not all CPAs are smart nor do they have a nice upward scaling career path. But a good amount of CPAs are smart people and have nice careers. I make sure people know that I am a CPA and not just a book keeper because the quality of work, pay, career are vastly different. And people perceive you differently.

post #34670 of 37396
Now you have to have a masters to be a CPA.
post #34671 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

Easy for you to say!

Now, it's a bit of a different story in accounting. There are accountants who are nothing but book keepers. They may even have a masters in accounting but they're just book keepers. Then there are the CPAs. And not all CPAs are smart nor do they have a nice upward scaling career path. But a good amount of CPAs are smart people and have nice careers. I make sure people know that I am a CPA and not just a book keeper because the quality of work, pay, career are vastly different. And people perceive you differently.

Noodles, I'm FCCA here in England. How would that compare with CPA in America?
post #34672 of 37396
Makes sense, Noodles. Lawyers to paralegals might sort of be analogous to CPAs to non-CPAs.
post #34673 of 37396

So the non-CPAs do all the work and it gets booked like the CPA did it? :devil:

post #34674 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlmostSmart View Post


Noodles, I'm FCCA here in England. How would that compare with CPA in America?

I do not have a clue. What is the process like to become a FCCA? I can speak for another country that handles accounting folks differently. In South Korea, accountants are treated with the same level of respect as doctors, lawyers, and professors. They cannot call themselves an accountant unless they pass a pretty damn hard test. The accountants have much greater power and respect in Korea but it is really hard to become one and that explains why there are relatively less of them. The test itself is relatively much harder than the US CPA exam. It is so easy that those who have trouble passing the SK CPA exam just take a month or two to study for the US CPA exam and pass it with a breeze. But they can't use the CPA designation since they don't have the work requirement.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

Makes sense, Noodles. Lawyers to paralegals might sort of be analogous to CPAs to non-CPAs.

Right on point.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

So the non-CPAs do all the work and it gets booked like the CPA did it? :devil:

 

The non-CPAs usually hold lower positions so they do what they're told by their managers (who usually are CPAs). Accounting in the U.S. is weird in that you tell your staff to book certain transaction a certain way and all they have to do is just repeat. The book keepers just do as they're told and just do the same crap over and over. 

 

I am not trying to make it sound like non-CPAs are a bunch of idiots and lazy people. But my first hand experience in the field has been that there is a clear difference.

post #34675 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

So the non-CPAs do all the work and it gets booked like the CPA did it? devil.gif

The best billing stories by far are the differences in how associates and partners keep track of their hours in law. As an associate, you put detailed stuff to the 6 or 15 minute interval (depending on preference). Partner running it puts something like "8 hours. Manage matter."
post #34676 of 37396
14 exams to pass, ranging from corporate taxation to business and case law, audit and internal control. You get the designation ACCA after passing the exams and completing 3 years in an accountancy environment. A further 5 years down the road you get FCCA so long as your CPD is up to date.
post #34677 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

The best billing stories by far are the differences in how associates and partners keep track of their hours in law. As an associate, you put detailed stuff to the 6 or 15 minute interval (depending on preference). Partner running it puts something like "8 hours. Manage matter."

That's the truth. And the hourly rate is like 20x more more.
post #34678 of 37396

I have a doctorate and a bunch of other letters. My work e-mail signature is Dr. So and So (So and So was my father's family name, obviously). I would introduce myself as Dr. to students on the first day of class or speaking at a conference (I also tell my students they can call me Dr. So and So if they feel formal, by my first name if they are feeling informal, or "sensei" if they want to mix it up a bit). I cannot imagine a scenario where I would introduce myself by anything other than my first and/or last name? And putting the string of letters after your name on your card, no matter how many you have, just seems to reek a bit of desperation (I had a boss who did it to "make up" for not having a doctorate).

 

And getting your MBA, like any voluntary study, usually results in exactly what you put into it; no more and no less. I did mine to broaden my horizons further and develop a better understanding of financial principles, entrepreneurship, and marketing. I didn't need the degree and I don't think it will change my life, but I got out of it exactly what I wanted, so it was very valuable to me.

post #34679 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isolation View Post
 

I have a very different experience than most of you. Most of the PhDs I've met are very amiable and intelligent people. They don't seem at all aloof or elitist either, talking to me, a non academic. I mean, they are from Cambridge too, which you'd assume is associated with some of the most prestige.


I worked at Cambridge; the snobbiest people I met there were staff, not faculty. Most of the faculty were pleased as punch to have you listen to them talk about their esoteric bit of research into whatever it is they were the sole world expert on!

post #34680 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post


The best billing stories by far are the differences in how associates and partners keep track of their hours in law. As an associate, you put detailed stuff to the 6 or 15 minute interval (depending on preference). Partner running it puts something like "8 hours. Manage matter."

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post


That's the truth. And the hourly rate is like 20x more more.

 

 

The only situation where I can imagine that happening is a bet the company case with eight figures exposure and a partner billing out at $800 an hour or more.  Apart from that, this kind of billing hasn't been tolerated for at least 10 or more years.

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