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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2255

post #33811 of 37395
With an OCBD, gray flannel pants, and suede chukkas. Will be amazing. Classic yet distinctive.

Bro's, ya'll needs to open your minds eye a little.
post #33812 of 37395
Thread Starter 
The naming of an object doesn't dictate its use (objectively).

That being said, I name that (and all other such hybrids) the Cardicoat.

It probably has a place in the 15-20th jacket range for most people (of those who will own more than a dozen jackets). 10-15th for some. 5-10th for folks like Tira (though I can't see the dude himself donning it).
post #33813 of 37395
Tbh it looks really cool to me. Def fits different purpose than most jackets but it overlaps in the casual spot I think.

Also Clags that's really cool (academic stuff we were talking about before) I'd say more but I'm working atm.

I'm going to bug you about Seoul if I ever go though, and use this common link as excuse.
post #33814 of 37395

Pasting this here on the advice of TM79 (original thread here).

Thank you all in advance for your advice.

 

After about 9 years working for a large hedge fund, I quit my job last year to start something of my own. I had to sit out a year for some legal reasons (with my former employer) and that year is due to end in a couple months (I'll be able to start work in Apr).

 

I am looking to create a "consistent" dressing format for me. At my previous place, my consistent clothing was dark wool slacks and a white (Banana Republic Tailored Slim Fit, size M - fit me very well except perhaps the sleeves could be 0.25-0.5 in shorter than they were). It worked for me and I did not have time to spend on choosing clothes - so I would simply go online and buy a bunch of shirts or slacks at a time, wear them till they would start losing the "new" feel and then repeat.

 

Right now I have time to think - I won't once I start working again. So I am thinking of changing over to wearing a suit every day. My preferences are:

 

Preferences

0. Once I am wearing what I am wearing, I need it to recede in the background. When I am working I do not want to be adjusting my suspender/belt, worrying about whether my shirt is slipping out or not, whether I am sitting on my pants right or not - nothing of the sort. I prefer not wearing a tie. I own a few Ascot ties that I have worn (inside open collars) on occasion with suits. I find closed collars uncomfortable, but maybe I just have been doing something wrong.

 

1. I need to be able to dress for work without thinking too much about what I am wearing. Whatever I go with, I will plan to set up a rotation and follow it blindly (unless there are special occasions).

 

2. It needs to look good - it needs to fit me well. I will much prefer sticking to slacks-and-shirt that work well rather than an ill-fitting suit. I don't care for branding at all, I do care for quality.

 

3. It should be good value for money. The fact that I can afford fairly high end stuff doesn't translate to me actually spending on it. I am not brand conscious at all.

 

Build

I am 5ft10in, and I weigh in at 180lbs. I have muscular shoulders, and a bit of belly/love-handle fat (usually choose a size 30 to 32 in trousers, but I realize that my actual waistsize in inches is perhaps higher because of the way trousers are marked) that I am working to get rid of. I usually fit in a 38R suit. I stand and sit tall, and I tend to move fairly actively (even though my day involves a lot of work on the computer, I walk around and move a lot - I do a fair bit of my work standing).

 

Tentative plan

1. Three piece suits. Primarily to (1) avoid having to worry about the shirt coming slightly untucked at the waist (2) hide suspenders out of view (see below). But also to look a bit different and dressier than usual. I am happy to abandon this idea (and stick to more conventional two piece suits) if my assumptions are incorrect.

 

2. Suspenders rather than belts - again with a view to not have the shirt pinched in at the waist.

 

3. 5 suits to start with and depending on what works buy 5-10 more over the year. I own 3 suits right now - two from Zegna and one from Hugo Boss. They were all bought on heavy discount from either Saks Fifth Ave or Bloomingdales. I don't think any of them was more than USD2k, all in price. None of them get much use. I like the fit of the Zegna suits much better than the Hugo Boss suit, and so the latter has perhaps been work exactly once. I am not going to count these suits - for that reason.

 

4. I don't want to spend more than around USD1.5K per suit - including perhaps an extra pair of trousers. I need to know that I am getting good value for my money.

 

I request your suggestions!

1. What are your thoughts about my plan above? Does it sound insane to the extent that I should simply stick to my usual slacks-and-shirt? Indeed that is what most people in the industry wear.

 

2. In case the plan makes sense, does my budget make sense? What is a reasonable budget for an everyday suit?

 

3. Where should I get the initial 5 suits from? I am lucky in that I live in NYC - practically everyone has a shop here that I can easily visit. I have spent the last day researching various varieties of bespoke/made-to-measure/etc. options on the internet and the short summary of what I have been able to learn is that it is a competitive and dirty industry (and the fact that the work starts only after you give up the money doesn't bode well for the experience, in my view). On the one hand everyone touts Martin Greenfield - they seem to run an assembly line operation and still charge fairly expensive prices. I am happy to buy off-the-rack suits if they have long-term quality and fit well. I tend to think I am a very conventional body type and fit easily, but I might be completely off about how the suits I have already really fit.

I would much prefer a no-BS small no-name shop - OTR or tailor - that fits me well than a more highbrow concern where I would worry about being ripped off.

post #33815 of 37395
That will be my 3rd navy SC, 2nd if you consider that one of the 3 I rarely wear. And it will be well worth it.
post #33816 of 37395

Really liking this Sozzi red/grey knit tie from Sozzi/Skoak

 

yea or nay

 

 

post #33817 of 37395
@vidyut, there are people a lot more experienced here than me that will give you much better feedback, but for what it's worth:

I'd drop the idea of a 3 piece if you don't plan on wearing a tie.

Suspenders are good. Stick with that.

As far as brand and vAlue proposition, I'd go Kent Wang MTM with Suit Supply as a second choice. KW offer great construction and materials, with an eye toward modern style and great quality at a very reasonable price. And you can get your whole kit there from suits to ahirts, ties, squares, suspenders, aocks, and shoes, if you are so inclined. They are an online mtm shop, but have great feedback, and if their standard sizes fit you well off the rack, no need to go mtm.

Hope this helps, and good luck on your new venture!
post #33818 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

With an OCBD, gray flannel pants, and suede chukkas. Will be amazing. Classic yet distinctive.

Bro's, ya'll needs to open your minds eye a little.

I am with you on this. fistbump.gif
post #33819 of 37395
Looks comfy as hell.
post #33820 of 37395
I had a question of my own: I'm looking fir a pretty basic tutorial on suiting and jacketing wool. What weights for what seasons. Worsted vs woolens. That sort of stuff. Did a little searching on the site and google, but it was hard because I wasn't even sure whT I was looking for. If anyone can point me in the right direction, I'd be grateful.
post #33821 of 37395
Mk & shugz! Now we're talking good sense!

---

Veni - maybe not crazy versatile, but yay all the same.
post #33822 of 37395

Urgent Help Needed! Help me not look like a business mullet.

 
Diversifying from 10 years working for a bank wearing the same Hugo Boss Navy and Gray suits bought on sale with various charles tyrwhitt type shirts.  Many in the company wear pretty bad suits and often with no tie. Las such, I believe I can get away with nicer sportcoat/trouser options, as displayed by many on this site. However, when I try putting a navy sport coat/blazer with gray trousers I look nothing like you folks and resemble the underground parking security guard.  I thought I was doing okay by starting with the following which I now own :

-  RLBL Navy Blazer (Anthony)
-  RLBL sharkskin suit (sans belt loops I realized later)
-  RLBL basket weave coat (looks almost tweedish gray but soft)
-  several mid gray to dark gray trousers (couple black fleece, 1 Milano, 1 panta)
-  several sale light blue BB Milano shirts with subtle patterns

I need help on how to make this sport coat/trouser look acceptable.  I think I need to swap out the silver buttons on the blazers for horn. Don't want to look like a doorman or business mullet.  Pictures of the blazer, sport coat, and sample of shirt/ties owned below.  Thanks much in advance!

 

501165741_product_1?$pdp_flexH$photo 11-11 140_zpsl1rmlaj1.jpg

Non-Iron Milano Fit Hairline Overcheck Dress Shirt

post #33823 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koala-T View Post

I had a question of my own: I'm looking fir a pretty basic tutorial on suiting and jacketing wool. What weights for what seasons. Worsted vs woolens. That sort of stuff. Did a little searching on the site and google, but it was hard because I wasn't even sure whT I was looking for. If anyone can point me in the right direction, I'd be grateful.


depends on your location/how how/cold you run. If you live in LA, you don't need a winter set of clothes for example, so you can wear a totally different wardrobe than if you lived in NY.

post #33824 of 37395
I really just break it down to comfort. If it's warm enough to feel cozy in the winter I wear it and if it's light enough to feel cool in the summer I wear that. Don't really bother myself too much with the particulars.
post #33825 of 37395
Quote:
I had a question of my own: I'm looking fir a pretty basic tutorial on suiting and jacketing wool. What weights for what seasons. Worsted vs woolens. That sort of stuff. Did a little searching on the site and google, but it was hard because I wasn't even sure whT I was looking for. If anyone can point me in the right direction, I'd be grateful.

 

What specific questions? There are much more knowledgeable people than me, but I lurk the unfunded liabilities thread so I can point you to some things.

 

Basically the iGent thing is flannel for winter, fresco for s/s (Manton made a list of 10 suits where 5 is flannel 5 is fresco and there's nothing in between lol), nobody likes shiny worsteds and supers even though in practice that's what most people in the real world wear (I guess that's not fair you guys like sharkskin too, and I don't so much). With books, I'm most familiar with Dugdale, and their English and Town Classics is seen as the best value evar, and their New Fine Worsted is like a cheaper solid version of fresco, and they have everything on their site so you can have a look.

 

Fresco/NFW and similar is generally 8-9oz, probably would be sweating a bit in the dead of summer, but about as light as it gets, and some people think if you are in a hot place or wear an overcoat, can work as 3 or 4 season suiting.

 

People prefer woolen to worsted flannel, but it sounds like worsted is a tad more practical, just doesn't feel as nice. You'd want worsted flannel for lighter weights because woolen ones don't have as much durability especially at lower weights. That's the main reason why you're most likely to end up with worsted woolens unless you have a very large wardrobe. Most flannels probably go from like 11-15oz, unless you approach coating material. Minnis and Fox is one of the more popular ones, I've used Fox mostly. Dugdale has a bunch of worsted woolens in the ETC book, and I like them a lot, and again it's seen as a very popular book.

 

Other than that, mohair and mohair blends are good summer suiting. Again Dugdale has a mohair book that's really good. They are more durable and stronger, in the past usually quite shiny but nowadays they have more matted looks too. In practice wears quite a bit like fresco tbh. Haven't worn enough to tell difference as it's been winter. Think probably wrinkles less.

 

I'm a big fan of matted fabrics so I do think that mostly focusing on Flannels and Frescos (of various weights perhaps) for seasonality is good. I'd probably put more emphasis on Frescos as there are more months of the year you can wear fresco than flannels. Like I said you can wear fresco for the entire year, there's indoor heating and overcoats anyway, seriously most people won't bat an eye. I'm sure if you want to make your wardrobe mostly fresco with some worsted woolens it'd be the most versatile, as opposed to having strict suits that's only wearable a few months of the year.

 

others correct me if I am wrong obv, iso is noob

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