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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2253

post #33781 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazedstate View Post

Need some advice on this shirt :
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
d06a004d_3.NavyandWhiteStripes.jpeg

Not super versatile I imagine but I've been trying to work in some patterned shirts into my wardrobe. What color combos would y'all suggest with it? Thank you.

Coats with a brown or tan or cream ground; ties with grounds in brown, maroon, orange, or indigo. I'd avoid ties with blue as a secondary color.
post #33782 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

Coats with a brown or tan or cream ground; ties with grounds in brown, maroon, orange, or indigo. I'd avoid ties with blue as a secondary color.
Great thank you. The shirt seems a bit more city rather than country to me. Agreed? Probably no good with tweed OJT but great with dressed down suits.
post #33783 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainTohm View Post

I used to wear a lot of cotton trousers because I thought it "dressed down" my odd jackets, but I've found that visually interesting wool trousers aren't stuffy looking and tend to look better than chinos. They hold a better crease, they don't need to be washed every time you wear them, they look more polished...

I still love chinos when I'm just wearing an OCBD or polo. But even then, I usually reach for raw denim.

Pants are a very weak point in my wardrobe currently. I'm debating going MTM through Luxire or maybe even KW to get a high waisted pair of pants. It seems insane that to find a pair of flat-front high rise pants, it's cheaper to go MTM than OTR. (Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, I desperately want to be wrong, if for no other reason, than to have a pair of well fitting pants to send to Luxire to duplicate.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkside View Post

Didn't know about this option. Do they have specific measurements anywhere?

As an update, I've received a pair of 34R pleated trousers from O'Connell's. The waist indeed has no vanity sizing, and following Luxire's front rise measurement, I measured it at 13". I haven't worn them enough to comment on quality (though my initial impression is very positive), but if 13" rise is what you had in mind, I'd say give O'Connell's a look.
post #33784 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazedstate View Post

Need some advice on this shirt :

d06a004d_3.NavyandWhiteStripes.jpeg

Not super versatile I imagine but I've been trying to work in some patterned shirts into my wardrobe. What color combos would y'all suggest with it? Thank you.
Huh?! Not versatile?
Is that blue? I have a shirt like that and it goes with almost anything. I usually wear it with a navy suit. For ties, I can do neats, pindots, and solids. I would consider that a versatile shirt.

Only if I didnt delete my pix...


Edit: on 2nd look, the stripes are thicker than mine so maybe not as versatile as I initially thut.
post #33785 of 37395
You can wear that with quite a bit Dazed...just look at my WAYWRN post today. I actually used to have that same Benjamin shirt...it's a good one.
post #33786 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cao Cao View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Huh?! Not versatile?
Is that blue? I have a shirt like that and it goes with almost anything. I usually wear it with a navy suit. For ties, I can do neats, pindots, and solids. I would consider that a versatile shirt.

Only if I didnt delete my pix...


Edit: on 2nd look, the stripes are thicker than mine so maybe not as versatile as I initially thut.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murlsquirl View Post

You can wear that with quite a bit Dazed...just look at my WAYWRN post today. I actually used to have that same Benjamin shirt...it's a good one.

Both great looks. Thanks for the enlightening. Am I correct about it being more of a city / suit leaning shirt? I can't for the life of me picture tweed or rough textured OJT working.
post #33787 of 37395
The stripes are wide enough where you could wear it with an flannel SC...or others. There are better options for tweed.
post #33788 of 37395
Thread Starter 

The only thing holding back it's versatility in my opinion is the darkness and vividness of the blue (note in CaoCao's example, he's wearing a shirt with lighter blue stripes). And I don't think that's a huge deal. You can wear it with most navy jackets without any issue, I think. But I'd hesitate to go lighter than navy.

post #33789 of 37395
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

Quote:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post



On mobile, and will reply in full later but:



- yup, one of my my research focuses is culture (specifically values). One of the more fascinating bodies of work is by a psychologist named Nisbett, who argues that decontextualized analytical approach that defines academia (and Western thought as a whole) is a direct descendent of certain dominant Greek philosophical traditions. So it isn't so much WASP as it is plain Western.



- poverty is an antecedent for collectivism (and cognitive dissonance theory would strongly suggest that being forced to rely on family will increase the degree with which family is valued even within a generation). In general, cultural values don't arise spontaneously. They are both self-propagating and responsive to environments.



Anyway, anecdotal evidence (and qualitative research) is an important and neglected aspect of research, in my opinion. Nothing wrong with properly framed personal experience and observation.


 





Wise words. If this is what you do for living, I envy you :-). Origin of values, in philosophical and psychological sense is my kind of hobby.



 



Well, whole Western way of thinking (not just science) has an origin in Greece, which in turn has origins... well... One can not truly understand Christianity without understanding Greek philosophy. If I may trow a joke, the problem is that today's West embraced classical Greek philosophy, but striped it of sun, sea, smell of olive oil and slave workforce :-)


Sorry I missed this. I was actually just sitting here thinking about how lucky I was (and feeling very content). For me, this is what contentment looks like:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


The coffee is decaf. I had a caffeinated one a few hours ago)

To be clear, I mostly focus on organizational culture and on national culture as it pertains to organizations. But in doing the latter, I've read a good amount on the development of culture (I also taught a class in Seoul on the development of cultural values and thought processes).

So I don't really get into the nitty gritty of culture in the traditional sense (though if I did, I'd be looking at a much smaller lifetime income)

---

Americans have a hard time disentangling religion from morality, I think, because we don't really comprehend the degree with which Christian morals, particularly those of the New Testament, are rooted in Greek philosophy. This was made even clearer after living in East Asia, where the dominant morality is directly tied philosophy, both in practice and in history.

I think it is rather telling that when when I took World Geography in middle school in the late 90's, Confucianism was taught as a religion. For a lot of Americans, if something is a belief system, it must be a religion. Philosophical belief systems don't even occur to many Americans because we have become so far removed from our own.
post #33790 of 37395
@dazedstate
I would post some pictures with that shirt and different SCs. Like I said, the stripes are a bit thicker.

I really hope westerners do not think of Confucianism as a religion.
post #33791 of 37395
Thread Starter 
I was taught that it was. :-(
post #33792 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

Speaking of Suit Supply and their linen blends, I was a bit surprised to find this herringbone in their spring/summer collection:

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/jackets/hudson-light-brown-herringbone/C960I.html?cgid=Jackets

Am I alone in finding a herringbone weave a bit odd in a summer linen jacket?  I've got quite a lot of herringbone (suits and odd jackets) and they're all distinctly fall/winter (indeed, a majority are tweed).  Is that seasonal association just a northeastern U.S./U.K. thing?

Cheers,

Ac
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
It's a wool-silk-linen jacketing. Those blends tend to run soft and delicate--tailors don't use them for trousers. The herringbone weave gives it a bit more strength than it would have in plain weave. I wouldn't be surprised if this allows the mill to cut down on the number of imperfects that it would get if it wove it in the more delicate plain weave. If so, they could then sell it at lower prices than plain weave wool-silk-linens offered by competitors. Makes sense, since suitsupply is for the budget-conscious.

It's definitely not a jacket for high summer, but should be fine for late spring or early autumn.

There are also pure linen herringbones. They do run a bit hotter than their plain weave brethren, since the weave is tighter. But they still have linen's moisture-expelling properties.

 

 

Thanks for the reply.    :)

 

I guess I didn't make myself clear.  I'm aware of the seasonal association of linen and linen blends.  My question, rather, was about the seasonal associations, if any, of the herringbone pattern regardless of the cloth.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac


Edited by Academic2 - 2/1/16 at 6:17pm
post #33793 of 37395
Thread Starter 
I wore a linen wool blend Friday. I am wearing one now. I will probably wear one later this week. Maybe two, come to think of it.

In total, I have five jackets/suits which are linen-wool. I like the combination for all the reasons listed earlier.

---

I don't associate herringbone with seasons, per se, but I associate it with tweed which I associate with a season.
post #33794 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

I wore a linen wool blend Friday. I am wearing one now. I will probably wear one later this week. Maybe two, come to think of it.

In total, I have five jackets/suits which are linen-wool. I like the combination for all the reasons listed earlier.

---

I don't associate herringbone with seasons, per se, but I associate it with tweed which I associate with a season.

 

Thanks.  That's more or less my chain of associations, too. 

 

Obviously given enough time these associations can weaken and even dissolve completely (I'm thinking for example of Glen check/POW which appears these days in linen and other summer cloths without anyone batting an eye), but for me that hasn't yet happened for herringbone.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #33795 of 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Sorry I missed this. I was actually just sitting here thinking about how lucky I was (and feeling very content). For me, this is what contentment looks like:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


The coffee is decaf. I had a caffeinated one a few hours ago)

To be clear, I mostly focus on organizational culture and on national culture as it pertains to organizations. But in doing the latter, I've read a good amount on the development of culture (I also taught a class in Seoul on the development of cultural values and thought processes).

So I don't really get into the nitty gritty of culture in the traditional sense (though if I did, I'd be looking at a much smaller lifetime income)

---

Americans have a hard time disentangling religion from morality, I think, because we don't really comprehend the degree with which Christian morals, particularly those of the New Testament, are rooted in Greek philosophy. This was made even clearer after living in East Asia, where the dominant morality is directly tied philosophy, both in practice and in history.

I think it is rather telling that when when I took World Geography in middle school in the late 90's, Confucianism was taught as a religion. For a lot of Americans, if something is a belief system, it must be a religion. Philosophical belief systems don't even occur to many Americans because we have become so far removed from our own.

That's pretty sick coincidence my spouse is doing their PhD in how nicomachean ethics shaped 17th century interpretations of prodigal son parable in theatre.

(I'm the unpaid copy editor)
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