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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2252

post #33766 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veremund View Post


We had Romans during the Empire. Does that count?

If you are referring to Frankfurt, then no, it doesn't count. That Roman thing didn't really stick, did it? :-)

post #33767 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

(my grandma lives with my aunt and my wife and I are both looking forward to my mom, who is ten years younger than my dad, living with us). 

Doesn't this sound awkward?

 

BTW, I do not find few generations living under one roof to necessarily be expression of strong family bonds. There is a middle ground there, and look no further then the good old Europe (especially more east and south parts).

post #33768 of 37396
Would a wool-linen blend be preferable pure wool?
post #33769 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuP View Post

Would a wool-linen blend be preferable pure wool?

Depends on the intended application. Coat? Necktie? Trousers? To be worn where, in what climate?
post #33770 of 37396
Discussing a Navy SC. Rarely a necktie. Climate - northeastern USA all year around.
post #33771 of 37396
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gs77 View Post

BTW, I do not find few generations living under one roof to necessarily be expression of strong family bonds. There is a middle ground there, and look no further then the good old Europe (especially more east and south parts).

Empirically, it is. Though how one defines family bonds might be an issue here. But there is a strong correlation between multi-generational households and both collectivism, the reported importance of family, and the degree with which grandparents and cousins are considered immediate family.
post #33772 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Close to six years. And Mrs. Claghorn is Korean (though I'd always figured I'd marry a Hispanic woman).

I was thinking more about within the US. I would have added that I'd not mind a significant Asian influence, but I don't think that really applies to any major cities in the US.

It was partially tongue and cheek, but I definitely feel most at home in a Hispanic (American) city (and would not feel particularly amiss in an Asian city). WASP culture is very...dry. Particularly when it comes to family. There are of course many, many exceptions, but one of the reasons I never imagined being married to a white woman was that I just strongly associated the family dynamic I desired with Hispanics (particularly Mexican-Americans). I ended up marrying a Korean, and my last two serious girlfriends were black (from a family with a very heavy emphasis on family) and Irish Catholic (she was also big on family).

Korean family values have certain superficial similarities with Mexican-American values, but their motivations are a bit different (generalizing and idealizing here, but Korean values are born of duty whereas Mexicans are of love. For example, during Chuseok, Koreans honor their dead in a very somber, formal ceremony. During Day of the Dead, there is tons of laughter as we get together as a family to remember the good times with our dead family). My wife actually prefers the Mexican approach.

Anecdote. The other day, I guest lectured a class of 50 or so. When collectivism came up, I asked how many students had grandparents living with their children (my grandma lives with my aunt and my wife and I are both looking forward to my mom, who is ten years younger than my dad, living with us). Eight students raised their hands: an Indian-American, two Asian-Americans, and five Hispanic-Americans. The class was probably a bit over half Anglo-American.

Anyway, I can easily see myself, regardless of cultural influence, in the West coast states, Texas, and large parts of the South. Midwest and Northeast, not so much.

Great reply. My girlfriend is Polish, and moved to Toronto when she was young. She's very family oriented. Meanwhile, I'm an only child and my parents' families are ... interesting. One side is not even remotely close and the other side is very compartmentalized. They're as far from WASPy as it gets, too. They just aren't close for various reasons.

Obviously I know that a lot of people are family oriented but I haven't really been exposed to it a whole lot, so it's been one of the many nice changes that came from being with her.

I agree with you that WASP culture in general comes off as dry, boring, and distant. I'm sure there are exceptions, though.

While Boston definitely has its share of non-WASP neighborhoods, I can't say the city seems to have any Latin influence. It's sorely lacking in quality Latin food, too. If you took our best Mexican place, I'd be willing to bet most street tacos in LA would put it to shame.
post #33773 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuP View Post

Discussing a Navy SC. Rarely a necktie. Climate - northeastern USA all year around.

Well, depends on how much linen in the blend, how heavy the fabric, what the weave is.. If it's 50 wool-50 linen, it'll run cooler than pure wools of the same weight and weave. It'll also wrinkle more than pure wools of the same weight. As despos once said, wool-linens are good if you want something more casual than smooth wools but don't want the full-on resort look of linen.

In, say, Connecticut, it'd be good for spring and fall. Probably too hot for high summer and a bit cold for winter.
post #33774 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post


Empirically, it is. Though how one defines family bonds might be an issue here. But there is a strong correlation between multi-generational households and both collectivism, the reported importance of family, and the degree with which grandparents and cousins are considered immediate family.

OK, you probably have some scientific data to prove this and I don't, so would just go with my own experience. (BTW, using such a dry science is soooo WASP :))

 

I was born and raised in one of the countries of former Yugoslavia which went from very traditional almost feudal system where blood and family were everything (one type of collectivism), through thin few decades of civil society (try on individualism), straight to communism (a bit different kind of collectivism, but still collectivism), and then another shaky try on civil society.

In the old days (till before WWII) it was normal for families to live 2-3 generations under one roof, and after the communism, I again see rise in this way of living. Now the reason is interesting, and it has to do not so much with rise of traditional values, but with society getting poorer and poorer (It is more economical to have multiple people sharing food, roof etc). Interestingly, few folks that I know that brought their brides to live with their parents, soon got divorced. As a side note, my home country got rid of communism, only to embrace poverty, along with democracy. 

 

Now, I do not have scientific data at hand, but could it be that relative poverty (i.e. lack of resources) is the original reason families get together, and living under one roof is just obvious way to get maximum economic value. You know, I'm not for dismantling the evolutionary values (family bonds being one of them), but some of the expressions of the bonds are very archaic. 

 

I now live half way cross the world from my parents, and when I ask my kids what they want to do during summer, they say "we go back home", and spend the whole summer with their grandparents. Swimming, bicycle, reading/writing my kids learned from my father. And, in our language we do not have word for cousin - it's simply "brother".

post #33775 of 37396
Thread Starter 
On mobile, and will reply in full later but:

- yup, one of my my research focuses is culture (specifically values). One of the more fascinating bodies of work is by a psychologist named Nisbett, who argues that decontextualized analytical approach that defines academia (and Western thought as a whole) is a direct descendent of certain dominant Greek philosophical traditions. So it isn't so much WASP as it is plain Western.

- poverty is an antecedent for collectivism (and cognitive dissonance theory would strongly suggest that being forced to rely on family will increase the degree with which family is valued even within a generation). In general, cultural values don't arise spontaneously. They are both self-propagating and responsive to environments.

Anyway, anecdotal evidence (and qualitative research) is an important and neglected aspect of research, in my opinion. Nothing wrong with properly framed personal experience and observation.
post #33776 of 37396
Quote:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post



On mobile, and will reply in full later but:



- yup, one of my my research focuses is culture (specifically values). One of the more fascinating bodies of work is by a psychologist named Nisbett, who argues that decontextualized analytical approach that defines academia (and Western thought as a whole) is a direct descendent of certain dominant Greek philosophical traditions. So it isn't so much WASP as it is plain Western.



- poverty is an antecedent for collectivism (and cognitive dissonance theory would strongly suggest that being forced to rely on family will increase the degree with which family is valued even within a generation). In general, cultural values don't arise spontaneously. They are both self-propagating and responsive to environments.



Anyway, anecdotal evidence (and qualitative research) is an important and neglected aspect of research, in my opinion. Nothing wrong with properly framed personal experience and observation.


 





Wise words. If this is what you do for living, I envy you :-). Origin of values, in philosophical and psychological sense is my kind of hobby.



 



Well, whole Western way of thinking (not just science) has an origin in Greece, which in turn has origins... well... One can not truly understand Christianity without understanding Greek philosophy. If I may trow a joke, the problem is that today's West embraced classical Greek philosophy, but striped it of sun, sea, smell of olive oil and slave workforce :-)

post #33777 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

Well, depends on how much linen in the blend, how heavy the fabric, what the weave is.. If it's 50 wool-50 linen, it'll run cooler than pure wools of the same weight and weave. It'll also wrinkle more than pure wools of the same weight. As despos once said, wool-linens are good if you want something more casual than smooth wools but don't want the full-on resort look of linen.

In, say, Connecticut, it'd be good for spring and fall. Probably too hot for high summer and a bit cold for winter.

Good to know.

Looking at the Suit Supply wool-linen blends. Will try to find out more about how much linen the blend contains.
post #33778 of 37396

Speaking of Suit Supply and their linen blends, I was a bit surprised to find this herringbone in their spring/summer collection:

 

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/jackets/hudson-light-brown-herringbone/C960I.html?cgid=Jackets

 

Am I alone in finding a herringbone weave a bit odd in a summer linen jacket?  I've got quite a lot of herringbone (suits and odd jackets) and they're all distinctly fall/winter (indeed, a majority are tweed).  Is that seasonal association just a northeastern U.S./U.K. thing?

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #33779 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

Speaking of Suit Supply and their linen blends, I was a bit surprised to find this herringbone in their spring/summer collection:

http://us.suitsupply.com/en_US/jackets/hudson-light-brown-herringbone/C960I.html?cgid=Jackets

Am I alone in finding a herringbone weave a bit odd in a summer linen jacket?  I've got quite a lot of herringbone (suits and odd jackets) and they're all distinctly fall/winter (indeed, a majority are tweed).  Is that seasonal association just a northeastern U.S./U.K. thing?

Cheers,

Ac

It's a wool-silk-linen jacketing. Those blends tend to run soft and delicate--tailors don't use them for trousers. The herringbone weave gives it a bit more strength than it would have in plain weave. I wouldn't be surprised if this allows the mill to cut down on the number of imperfects that it would get if it wove it in the more delicate plain weave. If so, they could then sell it at lower prices than plain weave wool-silk-linens offered by competitors. Makes sense, since suitsupply is for the budget-conscious.

It's definitely not a jacket for high summer, but should be fine for late spring or early autumn.

There are also pure linen herringbones. They do run a bit hotter than their plain weave brethren, since the weave is tighter. But they still have linen's moisture-expelling properties.
post #33780 of 37396
Need some advice on this shirt :

d06a004d_3.NavyandWhiteStripes.jpeg

Not super versatile I imagine but I've been trying to work in some patterned shirts into my wardrobe. What color combos would y'all suggest with it? Thank you.
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