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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2243

post #33631 of 37428

I like cords and moleskin, but I kinda thing tweed trousers have a bit more charm and character, and being wool, generally preferable too. You can have both, but if I had to limit my wardrobe, I think I might well make do with no cotton trousers in it (not including jeans). Flannels, tweed, and cavalry twill, then some jeans for the extreme end, seem to cover most of the bases. Cords are the only thing that strike me as having a specific vibe to them that is not reproducable. 

 

Dugdale cords are pretty good. The moleskin seem a bit uninteresting, though.

post #33632 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Nickels View Post

One of my roomies & friend in college was like that … 6' 2", 150 lbs. soaking wet. And yeah he ate like a goddamn garbage truck, lifted weights and couldn't put on an ounce.

 

I just looked up this phrase, apparently "soaking wet" means "the maximum weight someone could be." Where does this phrase come from? Even covered in lots of water, they don't weigh more than X?

post #33633 of 37428

The length of your coats looks fine. Some would insist on having them longer but to my eye reaching the knee is the minimum. They look good on you too.

post #33634 of 37428
Gosh, I can't imagine foregoing cotton trousers. I guess I am the anti-Clags. Sure, cotton is in between the extremes, but as an extreme conformist, I typically prefer the middle ground. I usually go by the "pick one interesting thing" method when I dress, i.e., usually only one element of any of my outfits is "interesting." Accordingly, most of the time I prefer versatility, and choose to augment any element that is mundane by fit.

A brief anecdote. A few years ago, I decided to invite 8 good friends - who were not overly familiar with one another - to "celebrate" Mardi Gras (if celebrate is the term to use). The 8 friends were well acquainted with me, but to a lesser extent with one another. I thought everyone would get along - each of the 8 friends was gregarious, outgoing, and liked having a good time. However, there was just too many people who were outgoing, gregarious, etc., and the group never meshed. Same thing with clothing. Character is never a bad thing, but too much character sometimes yields a jumbled mess. It is nice when you are able to turn to something that will blend without drawing too much attention.
post #33635 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

The length of your coats looks fine. Some would insist on having them longer but to my eye reaching the knee is the minimum. They look good on you too.

Thanks. Do you think the last brown one is too short then? I think it's more reasonable as it's a spring/autumn rain coat instead so maybe overly long would be a bit inappropriate. I was thinking shortening the heavy ones to about exactly knee length, so I guess you're in favor of keeping it long.

 

I think you're right about needing some neutral items, but flannel for instance, is a pretty neutral fabric, and so are calvalry twills, so I think going wool only doesn't pose a problem for getting something muted.

 

I don't know about summer chinos though, there are situations where linen is too informal, and you're not in a suit, where maybe summer (mohair?) wool trousers would still be a bit too formal. I'm going to try wearing more wool trousers in summer and see, especially since it's really hard to find chinos that fit me well, and I don't feel that keen on buying really expensive ones considering how easily they get dirty.

post #33636 of 37428

I'd consider it just a bit too short for me.

post #33637 of 37428
Why you no smile?
post #33638 of 37428
Any of you have or have opinions on zip up sweaters? I have a couple quarter zip ups and I'm not a fan. The collar has to be just right. If too stiff, it stands up straight like puppy ears and gives you a popped collar teen look. If too whimsy, it flattens and doesn't flatter.
post #33639 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuP View Post

Any of you have or have opinions on zip up sweaters? I have a couple quarter zip ups and I'm not a fan. The collar has to be just right. If too stiff, it stands up straight like puppy ears and gives you a popped collar teen look. If too whimsy, it flattens and doesn't flatter.

 

I have a heavy, cable knit, full zip that I like and wear regularly.  I'm also not a fan of quarter zip sweaters.

post #33640 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

I just looked up this phrase, apparently "soaking wet" means "the maximum weight someone could be." Where does this phrase come from? Even covered in lots of water, they don't weigh more than X?

Of course the water doesn't actually add that much weight... it's an idiomatic phrase man… don't interpret it literally.
post #33641 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Nickels View Post


Of course the water doesn't actually add that much weight... it's an idiomatic phrase man… don't interpret it literally.

 

I'm not. I asked you where it comes from -- I was trying to understand the etymology, since I already found the definition.

post #33642 of 37428
OK … this just sounded a bit literal to me … "Even covered in lots of water, they don't weigh more than X?" lol happy.gif

Anyway, sorry I have no idea ... your googling will be as good as mine. This falls under the category of "things my grandma/grandpa used to say" or possibly Keith Jackson the sports broadcaster who is known for his wacky phrases.

Seriously though I'm sure there are etymological origins, sometimes a determinative source is difficult to pinpoint. I take it you do not live in the US?
post #33643 of 37428
Usually when the phrase "soaking wet" is added it is meant to imply that the person being referred to is very skinny. So then, even when you soak them and their clothes to the bone - adding as much weight as possible to them - they are still very slight.
post #33644 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by mktitsworth View Post

Usually when the phrase "soaking wet" is added it is meant to imply that the person being referred to is very skinny. So then, even when you soak them and their clothes to the bone - adding as much weight as possible to them - they are still very slight.

 

OK, suspicion confirmed. Is that a midwestern thing?

 

I feel like it would make more sense to say "he weighs X lbs even when strapped in metal chains."

post #33645 of 37428
What 'tits said.
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