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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2203

post #33031 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 

If I’m going to going back and forth from indoors to outdoors, then a scarf.  If I’m going to be mostly outdoors, then something like this from a couple of days ago becomes useful, especially if I’m engaged in an activity where a scarf could be a hindrance.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

 

 

Very nice. I was planning on wearing it in a similar fashion. Any brand recommendations?

post #33032 of 37439
Inis Meain. No Man is having a 30% off knitwear/outwear sale...just started today.
post #33033 of 37439

On watches. I have a bit of an opinion about this, and some people may not like what I'm about to say. But here goes.

 

I really don't get the fuss about Rolexes. They are an overpriced mid-level tool watch. Nice casework, mostly boring designs, strong and functional but completely unfinished movement (which in any case you never get to see - luckily, as they are damn ugly).

 

Send a newish Rolex back for repairs and if there's anything broken inside the movement, they will most likely simply toss the whole thing in the bin and bang a brand-new one into your case. That's how precious those movements are. These days, many of the key parts are made from composites, or maybe silicon if you're lucky. The movements have also been redesigned as modular assemblies, to make repairs even easier.

 

To my mind, this horological philosophy places Rolexes in pretty much the same playing field as Seiko. But I prefer Seiko because their watches do not carry this overlay of...well...pretension. (Ducks head)

 

Many of my watch-loving friends, who IMHO should know better, do obsess over their double-red Submariners and Paul Newman Daytonas and so on. There is a genuine love and pride there, and I have no desire to gainsay that kind of enthusiasm - even if I consider it misplaced.

 

But there's another overlay here, which is not anybody-in-particular's fault, but which nevertheless rankles against my somewhat more "purist" stance. It's the fact that for the vast majority of buyers, the purchase of a Rolex is simply a statement of wealth, success and attainment. For these people - and I submit that "these people" constitute the vast majority of Rolex owners - it has nothing to do with the watch, and everything to do with the brand.

 

Another, more specific point regarding the Sea Dweller. The current version of this model is good to 3000 metres depth, or something like that. So, when's your next planned bathyscaphe trip to the base of the Marianas Trench? With all that water resistance, this is a helluva chunky watch. You might need to replace your shirt collection just to fit it under the cuffs.

 

OK, I suppose it's not quite as preposterous a concept as a diamond-encrusted Roger Dubuis Easy Diver Tourbillon. But let's face it. Most Sea Dweller owners don't even have a SCUBA licence.

 

Me? I do own a diving watch. An Omega Planet Ocean. Good to 300m, I've waterskied while wearing it. Sure, I'm not much of a diver. But with its George Daniels-designed coaxial escapement, this is a watch with some horological as well as tool value. And when I bought it, I knew exactly what I was buying and why I was buying. If you're thinking about buying into the Rolex story, I think you should have some understanding of exactly what that story is.

post #33034 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdrizzy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 

If I’m going to going back and forth from indoors to outdoors, then a scarf.  If I’m going to be mostly outdoors, then something like this from a couple of days ago becomes useful, especially if I’m engaged in an activity where a scarf could be a hindrance.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

 

 

Very nice. I was planning on wearing it in a similar fashion. Any brand recommendations?

 

 It really depends on how warm you want the thing to be, as they’re all over the map in that regard. 

 

The sweater in my photo is very light weight, and I wore it with that jacket and nothing else for a long afternoon outdoors with a temperature of 40-45 F when I wasn't particularly exerting myself.   If it was colder I’d have gone for something heavier, assuming, as I did, that I didn’t want to put on an overcoat.  

 

And of course wool isn’t the only material used;  cotton’s also pretty common.

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #33035 of 37439

Watches seem to be almost sui generis so far as men’s apparel is concerned.  

 

Because we’re SF we’re discussing them in the context of clothing, but most people think of them as jewelry I’d wager.   Like much jewelry, some people actually buy them as investments and indeed, for collectors, some of them do increase in value I believe (so there’s a financial component in such cases), and they’re also not uncommon as family heirlooms (so there’s an emotional component in these cases).     

 

Moreover I’ve never heard of an employer giving a retiring employee a gold suit.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #33036 of 37439
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

Moreover I’ve never heard of an employer giving a retiring employee a gold suit.

@LA Guy @Synthese

When the time comes.

---
post #33037 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

Moreover I’ve never heard of an employer giving a retiring employee a gold suit.

@LA Guy @Synthese

When the time comes.

---

 

:nodding:

post #33038 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

On watches. I have a bit of an opinion about this, and some people may not like what I'm about to say. But here goes.

I really don't get the fuss about Rolexes. They are an overpriced mid-level tool watch. Nice casework, mostly boring designs, strong and functional but completely unfinished movement (which in any case you never get to see - luckily, as they are damn ugly).

Send a newish Rolex back for repairs and if there's anything broken inside the movement, they will most likely simply toss the whole thing in the bin and bang a brand-new one into your case. That's how precious those movements are. These days, many of the key parts are made from composites, or maybe silicon if you're lucky. The movements have also been redesigned as modular assemblies, to make repairs even easier.

To my mind, this horological philosophy places Rolexes in pretty much the same playing field as Seiko. But I prefer Seiko because their watches do not carry this overlay of...well...pretension. (Ducks head)

Many of my watch-loving friends, who IMHO should know better, do obsess over their double-red Submariners and Paul Newman Daytonas and so on. There is a genuine love and pride there, and I have no desire to gainsay that kind of enthusiasm - even if I consider it misplaced.

But there's another overlay here, which is not anybody-in-particular's fault, but which nevertheless rankles against my somewhat more "purist" stance. It's the fact that for the vast majority of buyers, the purchase of a Rolex is simply a statement of wealth, success and attainment. For these people - and I submit that "these people" constitute the vast majority of Rolex owners - it has nothing to do with the watch, and everything to do with the brand.

Another, more specific point regarding the Sea Dweller. The current version of this model is good to 3000 metres depth, or something like that. So, when's your next planned bathyscaphe trip to the base of the Marianas Trench? With all that water resistance, this is a helluva chunky watch. You might need to replace your shirt collection just to fit it under the cuffs.

OK, I suppose it's not quite as preposterous a concept as a diamond-encrusted Roger Dubuis Easy Diver Tourbillon. But let's face it. Most Sea Dweller owners don't even have a SCUBA licence.

Me? I do own a diving watch. An Omega Planet Ocean. Good to 300m, I've waterskied while wearing it. Sure, I'm not much of a diver. But with its George Daniels-designed coaxial escapement, this is a watch with some horological as well as tool value. And when I bought it, I knew exactly what I was buying and why I was buying. If you're thinking about buying into the Rolex story, I think you should have some understanding of exactly what that story is.

All over the internet, two clubs exist when it comes to a Rolex : the hater club or the lover club. No suspense about which one you gravitate towards.

Regardless, I am glad to hear your opinion. I did browse the Omega boutique with wife, and, from a strictly aesthetic point, nothing jumped out at us. I was initially leaning towards a Sub, but the SD4K dial was much cleaner and more appealing. If you have other recs about a particular watch to check out in person, I am all ears.
post #33039 of 37439

Uhh... are we really talking about being practical and relevant (the waterproof references) on here?

post #33040 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuP View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

I'm totally on board with Clags on this one (from immunity to watch lust to the need for open communication). I'd want to understand why my wife was insistent on spending thousands of dollars on a gift that she knows I would not actually appreciate that much.

Well let's not get carried away here. I would appreciate the watch - just a matter of picking one's vice

I guess I've underestimated the sentimental value of an IRA...
post #33041 of 37439
"If you knew Ira, like I know Ira, ... Oh ... Oh ... Oh what a gal."
post #33042 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 

 

 

And of course wool isn’t the only material used;  cotton’s also pretty common.

Cheers,

 

Ac

 

Whilst cotton is pretty common, for knitwear it pretty much sucks. The exception is cotton-blends containing some silk/ wool etc that RL used to stock aeons ago.

 

As Ac stated earlier, it all depends on function and price. Personally for chillier weather under SC/overcoat, anything more than 2-ply cashmere is overkill. Ofc, merinos are plenty which is easier on the wallet and serves a similar function.

 

My personal favourites are alpaca and cashmere polo necks.

 

Polo necks are readily available running the gamut from your single-digit charity shop finds to your  double-digit uniqlos to your four-digit Loro Pianas etc

post #33043 of 37439

Where do you guys like your buttoning point to be (on jackets)? I usually like it to be ~1 inch above my navel.

 

Asking because I have one jacket where the buttoning point is at my navel/at the bottom of the navel, and it just feels low

post #33044 of 37439
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

Where do you guys like your buttoning point to be (on jackets)? I usually like it to be ~1 inch above my navel.

 

Asking because I have one jacket where the buttoning point is at my navel/at the bottom of the navel, and it just feels low

 

Out of curiosity, how tall are you?  I'm on the short side (5'9") and my favorite jackets button just above/on my navel.  

post #33045 of 37439

5-11

 

6 feet on a good day

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