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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2059

post #30871 of 37396

Yeah I don't really get the whole black suit thing. I think it has to be said that it looks very formal, but I don't see why in the right occasion or dressed in a way that is consistent with formality it won't work, if a tuxedo does. I wear my black suit rarely but it's not because I don't think it looks good, just because it fits a small niche, and I don't think that niche has to be "funeral". I feel like it's fine in any situation a dinner jacket would be appropriate, but nobody else would be wearing one so a suit would be less tryhard, so, basically, any slightly dressed up social night gathering. I wore mine last time to a small art exhibition in the evening. Think it was a good choice.

post #30872 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isolation View Post
 

Yeah I don't really get the whole black suit thing. I think it has to be said that it looks very formal, but I don't see why in the right occasion or dressed in a way that is consistent with formality it won't work, if a tuxedo does. I wear my black suit rarely but it's not because I don't think it looks good, just because it fits a small niche, and I don't think that niche has to be "funeral". I feel like it's fine in any situation a dinner jacket would be appropriate, but nobody else would be wearing one so a suit would be less tryhard, so, basically, any slightly dressed up social night gathering. I wore mine last time to a small art exhibition in the evening. Think it was a good choice.

If a dinner jacket is appropriate, but no one else is wearing one, then it isnt appropriate... 

post #30873 of 37396
Wearing dinner jacket to the laundromat
post #30874 of 37396
So... Your argument is no one you're with knows better, so it's okay? (Just trying to parse it out)
post #30875 of 37396
Guys. Let's not be dense. There are tons of social occasions which might have been black-tie appropriate one or two generations ago, but no one wears it now. Men are still wearing suits, though, so a black suit fills the role Iso describes above.
post #30876 of 37396
Thread Starter 

^ Agreed.

 

Iso, I look forward to your relationship with Steed. If you don't mind (and I'm about to make a huge request of you), have them make something which they think suits you best. You have plenty of stuff in your super suppressed style, so I am sort of curious what you'll think of a more traditional cut (which nevertheless fits, and since you have a narrow waist and broad shoulders, should still be in a shape that appeals to you).

 

As far as where we wear our suits, I think we all know by now that tweed is for toilets.

post #30877 of 37396
I think I'll bring my suit and tell them this is what I like and ask them what they think they'd do differently. That said I'm also considering huntsman (Richard Anderson) which does quite a bit of what I'm doing. Still I'll definitely be looking for their preferences and recommendations as opposed to simply recreating what I have.

And yes that's what I mean. One would've worn white or black tie at some gala, charity event, a theatre premiere, fancy drinks, evening art cocktail exhibition thing I went to, etc, and in fact they still do, but on the more informal ends of things where people will mostly be wearing suits, it's best to wear a suit too, but those are obviously occasions where decor, lighting, and mood makes something clean sharp and dramatic appropriate without being faux pas.
post #30878 of 37396
Thread Starter 
Richard Anderson or Huntsman? I think there is a pretty size able price difference, right?

Regardless, I look forward to it.
post #30879 of 37396

Well my understanding is that RA is basically the Hunstman cut, and it seems they are better regarded, especially for the price.

 

I actually don't know what I want, Hunstman esque cut or Drape, which is weird as they are seen as the two opposites. I think I want elements of both. I like the nipped waist as you know, and I think I like the dramatic silhouette of huntsman, especially the somewhat stronger shoulders and skirt flare with a high gorge, but I also like the drape in the chest, and honestly, it's not like drape cuts are super soft anyway, compared to general jackets, just compared to huntsman and other british cuts. I think I might like roping on the shoulders, or pagoda shoulders, like average padding on the actual shoulders, but stronger on the ends creating a more defined shape. Would I be right to describe it as a strong silhouette but soft drape? Other features (patch pockets and 3r2 configurations) probably can be considered soft features too, I think.

 

I'd love to talk to tailors themselves about it, so if I get an appointment I will probably ask them to describe their cuts and preferences in relation to what I like.

 

I think this must not be your preference Claghorn but the dramaticness and britishness of how people describe the hunstman cut is kind of what especially excites me about tailored clothing. I absolutely detest sack suits and am not a huge fan of attributes typically given as italian (I know there's a large range of styles of course). Not a huge fan of soft italian shoulders at all.

 

I do love BnT stuff though, and I also prefer 3r2 3r2.5 configurations, and not super super excited about 1 buttons.

post #30880 of 37396
@Isolation did you ever read Richard Anderson's book "Bespoke"? It's quite a fun read, even if his boasting becomes a bit tedious towards the end.
post #30881 of 37396

No I haven't but I have seen it referenced a lot, I think I will. Any other recommended reading to do with british tailoring and so on? I'd love to do more. I wonder how much it'd cost to run a MTM start up using chinese labour. I'm kinda personally interested in getting involved in that kind of thing, at some point.

post #30882 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isolation View Post
 

No I haven't but I have seen it referenced a lot, I think I will. Any other recommended reading to do with british tailoring and so on? I'd love to do more. I wonder how much it'd cost to run a MTM start up using chinese labour. I'm kinda personally interested in getting involved in that kind of thing, at some point.

 

I don't know if you'll get that kind of information easily. People who've made that work will probbaly keep it to themselves.

I believe @unbelragazzo started a thread about essential books for the igent. Should be found on SF somewhere.

FWIW, I think the classic Huntsman cut would suit your frame well:

 

post #30883 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Cox, does your thinking on this extend to formal wear? Should a white man not wear a black tuxedo?

 

Yes, and no. A white (i.e. pink) man need not avoid a black tuxedo. Black is not a colour, it is the absence of colour; hence it goes with any complexion equally well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Guys. Let's not be dense. There are tons of social occasions which might have been black-tie appropriate one or two generations ago, but no one wears it now. Men are still wearing suits, though, so a black suit fills the role Iso describes above.

 

Yes, these are good arguments in favour of the black suit.

 

However, if the occasion calls for formal wear, I am still going to wear a tuxedo, and fuck everybody.

post #30884 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

Yes, these are good arguments in favour of the black suit.

However, if the occasion calls for formal wear, I am still going to wear a tuxedo, and fuck everybody.

If the occasion calls for formal wear, i doubt it will be appropriate to fuck everybody.
post #30885 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliodA View Post


If the occasion calls for formal wear, i doubt it will be appropriate to fuck everybody.

 

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