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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2042

post #30616 of 37429
This thread has been de-railed before. No need to worry about that.
Edited by ter1413 - 9/10/15 at 1:23pm
post #30617 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Six View Post


Check the B&T thread for more details. They're now offering a MTM service that involves trying on a standard sized suit/jacket/trousers and adjusting from that block. It looked pretty consistent with their house style. They also have an agent in NY. His contact info is in the thread. He isn't quite ready to start taking orders but should be soon-ish.

at the risk of sounding like a total dummy, would you please provide link to thread?

post #30618 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

I do it the way Jesse showed, except that I don't turn the sleeve inside out.  Had the same thought when reading of Coxie's mishap.  Hope it comes out!
This. When I needed take my "nice" suit across the globe, I was advised here to turn it inaide out. Moreover, put one sleeve into the other so you have one side in the other.

By the way, I flew in the latest Boeing 380yeaterday. Freaking huge as hell. I was tempted to walk upstairs but didnt.
post #30619 of 37429

Ah, that Jesse Thorn mustache.

post #30620 of 37429

Latest Armoury instagram post.

 

pic description = nacky-san taking a breather and listening to bbc6!

 

 

:paranoia:

post #30621 of 37429

If I need more tailored clothes than I'm wearing, I'll always pack them (along with dress shirts) in a long department store/tailor-style garment bag-- sometimes I'll put the items inside in separate plastic dry cleaning bags to prevent wrinkling. All of my other stuff goes in whatever carry-on I'm using (usually small enough to fit under a seat.) You can fit a surprisingly large amount of clothing this way, especially if you can stand to pack on wire hangers.

 

The best part about this system is that a garment bag like this will pretty much always fit in the overhead. There's also a decent chance of getting flight attendants to hang the garment bag in that little coat closet in first class.

 

I've tried "suiters" and garment bag-luggage combos and found them to be a poor compromise.

post #30622 of 37429

That's actually a good idea.

Real garment bags are way too cumbersome. There is always one fool who brings those on the plane. (With apologies to the posters above)

post #30623 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Six View Post

Check the B
at the risk of sounding like a total dummy, would you please provide link to thread?

No problem! http://www.styleforum.net/t/395678/an-interview-with-b-tailor/240#post_8065885
post #30624 of 37429

Sorry to be dense, I did not see mention of the NYC option in that thread or contact info for the NYC agent. I know they are not live yet, just looking to learn more about the option. Thanks
post #30625 of 37429
^ Scroll up from that post. It might be on a previous page depending on whether you're looking on mobile or desktop. Steve Yoo mentioned the NY agent and provided a contact email address.
post #30626 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by turkoftheplains View Post
 

If I need more tailored clothes than I'm wearing, I'll always pack them (along with dress shirts) in a long department store/tailor-style garment bag-- sometimes I'll put the items inside in separate plastic dry cleaning bags to prevent wrinkling. All of my other stuff goes in whatever carry-on I'm using (usually small enough to fit under a seat.) You can fit a surprisingly large amount of clothing this way, especially if you can stand to pack on wire hangers.

 

The best part about this system is that a garment bag like this will pretty much always fit in the overhead. There's also a decent chance of getting flight attendants to hang the garment bag in that little coat closet in first class.

 

I've tried "suiters" and garment bag-luggage combos and found them to be a poor compromise.

 

The bolded part: amazingly effective at preventing wrinkles! The first time someone told me that, I laughed, but now I never travel without doing it. It's a great tip.

post #30627 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

How is your madder project coming along or has that been shelved?

Ed,

I planted at our current workshop in Chiang Mai on level former rice fields, madder seeds about two years ago and they grew very well without much care.

Then one day they were accidentally covered over by a tractor.

Now we are almost finished building a new workshop again in Chiang Mai but in the hills. I think that the madder will grow well there as everything else that we are growing there so far is growing well.

In this area there is natural dyeing being done with cotton which is interesting as most of Thailand has switched over to modern chemical dyes.

Growing madder and getting nice colors will straightforward but finishing fabric so that it is colorfast will take some experimenting. Some of the dyeing done with cotton may have some finishing techniques which I can adopt to madder.

Madder will give a range of reds, oranges and almost yellow. Indigo grows very well so that will give another color. Earth type brown tones can also be done naturally.

post #30628 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

- sigh -

I left NY at lunchtime on Monday. Back in Sydney now, it's 3.30am, and of course I am unable to sleep.
Same here. I am on the other side of the globe and cannot sleep...
post #30629 of 37429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Hober View Post

Ed,

I planted at our current workshop in Chiang Mai on level former rice fields, madder seeds about two years ago and they grew very well without much care.

Then one day they were accidentally covered over by a tractor.

Now we are almost finished building a new workshop again in Chiang Mai but in the hills. I think that the madder will grow well there as everything else that we are growing there so far is growing well.

In this area there is natural dyeing being done with cotton which is interesting as most of Thailand has switched over to modern chemical dyes.

Growing madder and getting nice colors will straightforward but finishing fabric so that it is colorfast will take some experimenting. Some of the dyeing done with cotton may have some finishing techniques which I can adopt to madder.

Madder will give a range of reds, oranges and almost yellow. Indigo grows very well so that will give another color. Earth type brown tones can also be done naturally.


Interesting experiment! But since apparently illegal because it's damaging to the environment, aren't you concerned about that? What exactly makes the process so damaging?
post #30630 of 37429

menswear > environment

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