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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 2006

post #30076 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainTohm View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

(1)  Do you always wear a tie?

(2)  What is the climate like where you live?

(3)  Do you wear mostly suits or mostly odd jackets?

Cheers,

Ac

My job does not require me to wear a tie, but I often opt to wear one simply out of preference and my love of Kent Wang's grenadines and knits. I order all my shirts through Proper Cloth, and I'm planning on trying the Roma cutaway collar for my next order due to advice I've received on this site regarding its versatility with or without a tie.

Kentucky is a true four-season state. Our summers are in the 90s and our winters' snow. Most likely, I'll eventually need a handful of seasonal shirts in my rotation, but currently my closest is lean enough I haven't set that as a priority.

I almost always wear jackets and trousers as opposed to a suit. I've been considering introducing a fully suited look into my weekly rotation, but I'm already the only person besides my boss who wears a jacket or tie to work.

My main concern with shirts is patterns, colors, and versatility. I'm not sure where to start regarding stripes, checks, ginghams (I'm sure a few people just shuddered), etc.

Thanks for inquiring/reading!

 

The reason I asked about the tie and the jacket is that your answers will give us some indication of how formal your usual dress is (the reasons for the climate question is obvious, I assume), and that matters when discussing patterns.

 

As I’m sure you already know, other factors being equal any pattern is less formal than a solid.  How much less formal depends on how vivid the pattern is, among other things.  I wear a suit and tie almost all the time and when it comes to patterns I find widely spaced pinstripes against white to be the most consistent with that level of formality.  If I owned any checked shirts I’d probably reserve them for odd jackets, although in my experience many bolder checks are best left tieless altogether.

 

For someone who does bolder stripes consistently well in what would be in many places business-appropriate fits, @EliodA comes to mind.

 

Edit:  Here's an example of what I mean by "widely spaced pinstripes against white."  The shirt is from Luxire.

 

 

 

Cheers,

 

Ac


Edited by Academic2 - 8/26/15 at 1:52pm
post #30077 of 37403
edit
post #30078 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainTohm View Post


My job does not require me to wear a tie, but I often opt to wear one simply out of preference and my love of Kent Wang's grenadines and knits. I order all my shirts through Proper Cloth, and I'm planning on trying the Roma cutaway collar for my next order due to advice I've received on this site regarding its versatility with or without a tie.

Kentucky is a true four-season state. Our summers are in the 90s and our winters' snow. Most likely, I'll eventually need a handful of seasonal shirts in my rotation, but currently my closest is lean enough I haven't set that as a priority.

I almost always wear jackets and trousers as opposed to a suit. I've been considering introducing a fully suited look into my weekly rotation, but I'm already the only person besides my boss who wears a jacket or tie to work.

My main concern with shirts is patterns, colors, and versatility. I'm not sure where to start regarding stripes, checks, ginghams (I'm sure a few people just shuddered), etc.

Thanks for inquiring/reading!

With respect, shirts won't be what you need from a seasonal perspective. That said, I LOVE linen so popping a few in there for summer would get my approval!

 

Also, PC introduced some new flannels, one in particular being a cream one. I'd be extremely curious to try that out as a business-esque shirt.

 

This certainly should be ignored if it is not to your style, but I would say you've essentially got all that you need (design wise, because can one ever have too many white shirts?!). I'd just expand the depth, rather than the breadth of the collection.

 

On another note, take care not to come off as aloof or above others by the way you dress. I had a similar experience to you a few years back where the standard (I will NEVER understand it) dress code was shirt/slacks/tie/"dress" shoes (though dress should be taken lightly...some were truly heinous). I always wore an odd jacket and trousers, and was eventually explicitly told to nix the jacket, for the reason that it might seem a bit stuck up to so consistently out-dress the accepted dress code.

post #30079 of 37403

I've decided that I dislike ties without tipping and with those silly handrolled edges.

post #30080 of 37403
Thanks for all for the continuing advice, everyone! I'll be applying all this information to some new shirt purchases in the near future.
post #30081 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by semperexcelsius View Post
 

I've decided that I dislike ties without tipping and with those silly handrolled edges.

 

What's this, semperpretencius turning into the Anti-iGent? ;)

post #30082 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliodA View Post
 

 

What's this, semperpretencius turning into the Anti-iGent? ;)

I do not like them, Sam-I-am.

 

Thumb for the clever name.

post #30083 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by semperexcelsius View Post
 

I do not like them, Sam-I-am.

 

Thumb for the clever name.

 

I'm with you bro, don't like them either. A gratuitous affectation, IMO. I do admit I own one untipped, handrolled tie but that's a very un-igent heavy jacquard 7-fold.

post #30084 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliodA View Post
 

 

I'm with you bro, don't like them either. A gratuitous affectation, IMO. I do admit I own one untipped, handrolled tie but that's a very un-igent heavy jacquard 7-fold.

IMO, not just a gratuitous affectation... it's plain inferior. I feel like I'm paying for the privilege of having less material in a tie in which you can see through the end.

post #30085 of 37403

I assure you, the untipped wool ties that I own from Drakes to Cappelli are a thing of beauty in part because of the hand rolled edges. Were you to see the back side of the blade, there would be no impression of inferiority but of expert craftsmanship.

post #30086 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 

I assure you, the untipped wool ties that I own from Drakes to Cappelli are a thing of beauty in part because of the hand rolled edges. Were you to see the back side of the blade, there would be no impression of inferiority but of expert craftsmanship.

I was at Drake's the other week, and though it may be expert craftsmanship, I still think it detracts from the tie as a whole (craft for the sake of craft). It looks worse from the front, IMO. It also bugs me a little how the lining is more or less exposed when you don't have tipping.

post #30087 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by semperexcelsius View Post

I've decided that I dislike ties without tipping and with those silly handrolled edges.

I believe certain high end shirtmakers will only make shirts for you after first seeing your ties with handrolled edges... tounge.gif
post #30088 of 37403
Well they definitely aren't as sturdy as self tipped tie that's for sure, and that's why I don't make any un-tipped grenadines unless special ordered, they just stretch too much with the lesser structure in them. But they do make for a great lighter weight summer tie in linens, printed silk etc and help keep the weight down on heavier weight fabrics like shantung.

But the average non SF person buying a tie from a store doesn't get un-tipped ties that's for sure.
post #30089 of 37403
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post


I believe certain high end shirtmakers will only make shirts for you after first seeing your ties with handrolled edges... tounge.gif

I'll be sure to wear my one handrolled tie to meet Kabbaz.

post #30090 of 37403

HC, I'm not sure why lack of tipping would lead to extra stretching in grenadines (versus lack of lining along the parts of the tie that do get stretched away from the tip). Hand rolling I can understand to add some delicacy to the tie. I agree that untipped is nice for summer ties; it adds to the sense of lightness. I quite like it in wool ties for it lightens the heaviness of that material.

 

None of this will be very visible to the external observer. Unless your tie is flapping in the wind or they are looking at close range at the tip of the tie, it matters little to them. 

 

Which is to say, we make all sorts of choices on things that have not normative but aesthetic value or valuing craftsmanship. Semperexcelsius has come to dislike rolled edges on ties. That's great, as he develops his tastes. I like them for a different dimension that they add to the tie, making wool and summer ties seem lighter. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by semperexcelsius View Post
 

It also bugs me a little how the lining is more or less exposed when you don't have tipping.


There's no reason why the lining need be exposed.


Edited by TweedyProf - 8/26/15 at 6:50pm
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