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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1989

post #29821 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 

Gentlemen, what are your thoughts on Glen plaid for odd jackets or trousers? 

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post
 

Yes to both, but scale, vividness of pattern, and texture all figure significantly.  One of my favorite fall/winter looks (I do this and so does UrbanComposition) is flannel PoW check trousers with a navy jacket.  

 

With odd jackets, I think it's a hugely underrated look, largely because people are afraid of having their SC mistaken for an orphaned suit jacket.  It allows you to add a bit of visual interest to the "uniform."  It's also a great frame for solid winter ties and grenadines (sorry-not-sorry, @semperexcelsius).  

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Something like a GlenRoyal is always a good bet:

 

 

I nearly bought this suit, in fact, because I thought it would work just as well as separates in odd-trouser fits, but sizing killed it for me: 

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

Thanks.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

I’m not sure the second is a Glen plaid, but perhaps the photo is deceptive.  (Whatever it is I like it.)

 

It wouldn’t surprise me if opinions on this question vary depending on where in the world one is and how old one is.   Regardless, you make a good point about the scale and vividness of the pattern and the texture of the cloth mattering.

 

My chief worry is that it’s a pattern that is so strongly associated with suits that any other use will always look orphaned, as you mention.  But that’s an association based on the experiences of a baby boomer raised in the American northeast, where the Glen plaid suit was at times pretty standard business apparel.   I don’t know how widespread that association is.

 

Of course the traditional Glen plaid jacket will resolve to medium gray at a distance, so one also encounters the pairing difficulties associated with that, but that’s been discussed quite a bit.

 

Thanks again.

 

Anyone else have any thoughts?

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

 

 

 

Neither of those is what u mean amirite?  If you mean the traditional Glen Urquhart check like this ..

 

 

then i would say steer clear for odds.  It's a suiting, and as u say, resolves to grey (or blue, or whateva).

 

I'd particularly steer clear of it for pents.  Patterned odd trews r bad at the best of times, but glencheck pents remind me of 70s hipster-gangsters.  

As for SCs  a grey SC in a glenplaid is probably the hardest to pair with anything because u have to rule out grey trews (unless they r much lighter or much darker).  

 

As a suiting, in grey, I absolutely love it, particularly with a blue overcheck.  My preference is for a relatively muted, low saturation check, so that it resolves to a solid from a few feet.  

post #29822 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

 

 

Neither of those is what u meant amirite?  If you mean the traditional Glen Urquhart check like this ..

 

 

then i would say steer clear for odds.  It's a suiting, and as u say, resolves to grey (or blue, or whateva).

 

I'd particularly steer clear of it for pents.  Patterned odd trews r bad at the best of times, but glencheck pents remind me of 70s hipster-gangsters.  

As for SCs  a grey SC in a glenplaid is probably the hardest to pair with anything because u have to rule out grey trews (unless they r much lighter or much darker).  

 

As a suiting, in grey, I absolutely love it, particularly with a blue overcheck.  My preference is for a relatively muted, low saturation check, so that it resolves to a solid from a few feet.  

 

Bingo.   Thanks.

 

Yes.  Traditional, or original, Glen plaid (or check) has only black or white threads and no overcheck.  That's what I'm talking about.

 

May I ask very roughly where in the world you are?   I'm curious as to how widespread the association of the cloth is with suiting  If you'd rather not say, that's fine, of course.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29823 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
 

 

Neither of those is what u meant amirite?  If you mean the traditional Glen Urquhart check like this ..

 

 

then i would say steer clear for odds.  It's a suiting, and as u say, resolves to grey (or blue, or whateva).

 

I'd particularly steer clear of it for pents.  Patterned odd trews r bad at the best of times, but glencheck pents remind me of 70s hipster-gangsters.  

As for SCs  a grey SC in a glenplaid is probably the hardest to pair with anything because u have to rule out grey trews (unless they r much lighter or much darker).  

 

As a suiting, in grey, I absolutely love it, particularly with a blue overcheck.  My preference is for a relatively muted, low saturation check, so that it resolves to a solid from a few feet.  

 

Bingo.   Thanks.

 

Yes.  Traditional, or original, Glen plaid (or check) has only black or white threads and no overcheck.  That's what I'm talking about.

 

May I ask very roughly where in the world you are?   I'm curious as to how widespread the association of the cloth is with suiting  If you'd rather not say, that's fine, of course.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

 

 

I'm Australian Ac.  You do see see quite of bit of glencheck suiting here.    

BTW Fun fact from the wikipedia article-  Cary Grant's iconic ventless suit in N by NW was a gencheck.  Most famous suit of all time AFAIK

 

post #29824 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

 

I'm Australian Ac.  You do see see quite of bit of glencheck suiting here.    

BTW Fun fact from the wikipedia article-  Cary Grant's iconic ventless suit in N by NW was a gencheck.  Most famous suit of all time AFAIK

 

 

Thanks, Pliny.   Great photo.

 

In the northeast US it used to be a very common business suit, with particular associations with bankers, though I think that was too narrow a stereotype given the actual range of businesses where you'd see it.

 

Thanks, everyone.  Much appreciated, as always.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29825 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post
 
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
 

I'm Australian Ac.  You do see see quite of bit of glencheck suiting here.    

BTW Fun fact from the wikipedia article-  Cary Grant's iconic ventless suit in N by NW was a gencheck.  Most famous suit of all time AFAIK

 

 

 

Thanks, Pliny.   Great photo.

 

In the northeast US it used to be a very common business suit, with particular associations with bankers, though I think that was too narrow a stereotype given the actual range of businesses where you'd see it.

 

Thanks, everyone.  Much appreciated, as always.

 

Cheers,

 

 

Ac

 

 

 

I just did something that reminded me of one of the great virtues of glen check.. i.e.   I dropped a piece of buttered  toast onto my lap.

 

The check is fantastic at disguising stains.

post #29826 of 37396

This is one of the many, many reasons I love grey flannel in general.  

post #29827 of 37396

And tweed, of course.

 

One of uses to which tweed was put was as camouflage whilst hunting, after all—hence all the ‘earth tones’. 

 

You can get a lot of tweed pretty dirty before it becomes noticeable.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29828 of 37396
You guys realize that you can actually clean your clothes?
post #29829 of 37396

True, but rare is the day that I carry around a spare pair of trousers, and teaching with a visible stain on your pants....well, you can surmise that it tends to diminish what little respect I already possess.  

post #29830 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post

True, but rare is the day that I carry around a spare pair of trousers, and teaching with a visible stain on your pants....well, you can surmise that it tends to diminish what little respect I already possess.  

LOL, I'd venture to say that that is also dependent on where the stain happens to be. wink.gif
Seriously though, a spare jacket and pair of trousers in your office closet? Gives you a chance to actually prove the versatility mantra.
post #29831 of 37396

^That's a very good idea, Elio--I think I'll do that, actually. 

post #29832 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post

^That's a very good idea, Elio--I think I'll do that, actually. 

I learned the hard way, spilling coffee on my trousers five minutes before a major presentation.
And don't forget a few spare ties.
post #29833 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliodA View Post

You guys realize that you can actually clean your clothes?

 

Well,  any excuse to just keep ordering new ones  :)

post #29834 of 37396

Noodle comment.

 

In the new Guy Ritchie film The man from U.N.C.L.E.  Henry Cavill wears bespokke Timothy (Savile Row) Everest suits.  He looks fantastic. (It's a period film, 1960s I think).  I noticed that rather than displaying  unadorned horn buttons, the suit buttons appeared to be faced with the suit cloth.

 

You might be able to make it out here..

 

 Looks cool.  

post #29835 of 37396

Napoleon Solo in a hard 3-button with waistcoat, self-faced buttons and ticket pocket?

 

All seems a bit try-hard to me. Plus guys weren't that "built" in the sixties.

 

The pagoda shoulders are cool though.

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