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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1951

post #29251 of 37408

Rule of thumb, never assume. Even competent people can have an incorrect idea of what you want if you don't lay it out for them. Perhaps the tailor is not good, but it's still the customer's responsibility to communicate what they want with a reasonable amount of detail. If the tailor responds with "Yes yes, I know how to do this!" then great. You didn't lose anything for it and now you can be assured that you will get what you want.

post #29252 of 37408
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Disagree. Perhaps he erred in his selection of alterations tailor, but a competent tailor would either assume adjusting from the shoulder or point out the impact of shortening the sleeve from the cuff end.


What I was trying to say was that....after the past week in this thread...one should not assume anything!
You don;t just drop off a jacket and ask for the sleeves to be shortened and NOT ASK how it will be done.
post #29253 of 37408
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

^^^ That might really bother some people but honestly it's not that big of a deal to me. If having a button close to the edge really bothers you then simply unbutton the closest one to the edge, walk around confidently, and tell anyone who asks that it is your own personal idea of sprezz.


^This

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ter1413 View Post


What I was trying to say was that....after the past week in this thread...one should not assume anything!
You don;t just drop off a jacket and ask for the sleeves to be shortened and NOT ASK how it will be done.


and this^

post #29254 of 37408

Speaking of sleeves ...

 

A question regarding the relative difficulty of various jacket surgeries.

 

Shortening a sleeve from the bottom is pretty easy as jacket tailoring tasks go.  Ditto for most minor adjustments to the waist.   On the other hand, it’s my understanding that the shoulder is quite difficult to alter, which is why the conventional advice when buying off-the-rack is to find something which fits in the shoulder and is the proper length since these are the hardest to change.

 

Where would shortening the sleeve from the top (at the sleevehead) fit into this abstract “other factors being equal” ranking of degree-of-tailoring difficulty?

 

I’m curious because one of the reasons I’ve not tried Suit Supply is because I would need to have the sleeves shortened (there are other reasons too).

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29255 of 37408
As long as the buttons aren't functional, you can alter sleeves from the end ( non-shoulder), and it is easy.

If buttons are working - much more difficult, especially if the fabric has a pattern (for matching purposes), and you may need more fabric.
post #29256 of 37408
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

As long as the buttons aren't functional, you can alter sleeves from the end ( non-shoulder), and it is easy.

If buttons are working - much more difficult, especially if the fabric has a pattern (for matching purposes), and you may need more fabric.

 

Yes, but that's what I just said.

 

You're right about the pattern, of course.  It can cause problems when altering other things, too.

 

To keep it simple, let's assume the fabric's solid.

 

Are there aspects of the shoulder expression that make shortening at the top either easier or harder?

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29257 of 37408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post


Where would shortening the sleeve from the top (at the sleevehead) fit into this abstract “other factors being equal” ranking of degree-of-tailoring difficulty?


AFAIK, it's very difficult. Not only the pattern matching problem as noted, but the sleeve attachment as well. Not all tailors are equally adept at the various types of shoulder expression. For example, asking a British schooled tailor to shorten your manica a camicia is likely to give less than stellar results.
I believe @Coxsackie had a suit altered where the shirring on one of the shoulders was messed up.

It's an alteration I would personally avoid. Better look for something else.
post #29258 of 37408
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliodA View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post


Where would shortening the sleeve from the top (at the sleevehead) fit into this abstract “other factors being equal” ranking of degree-of-tailoring difficulty?
 

AFAIK, it's very difficult. Not only the pattern matching problem as noted, but the sleeve attachment as well. Not all tailors are equally adept at the various types of shoulder expression. For example, asking a British schooled tailor to shorten your manica a camicia is likely to give less than stellar results.
I believe @Coxsackie had a suit altered where the shirring on one of the shoulders was messed up.

It's an alteration I would personally avoid. Better look for something else.

 

Yeah, more or less what I figured.  Thanks.

 

I don't have any Neapolitan shouldered jackets.  Mostly my stuff is structured to some degree, with a bit of shoulder extension and sometimes a bit of roping.  Just curious to learn what sort of issues are associated with what sort of shoulder expression. 

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29259 of 37408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post
 

 

Yeah, more or less what I figured.  Thanks.

 

I don't have any Neapolitan shouldered jackets.  Mostly my stuff is structured to some degree, with a bit of shoulder extension and sometimes a bit of roping.  Just curious to learn what sort of issues are associated with what sort of shoulder expression. 

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

I've had it done on a couple of jackets (none of them Neapolitan shouldered).  The biggest issue other than the actual shoulder head is sleeve pitch, which can change if a tailor does not correct for the torsional change (not sure if that's the right word) that occurs when the sleeve is reattached at a different point.  

post #29260 of 37408
I had the sleeves shortened from the shoulder on the jacket of a suit, and it came out fine. Solid-ish pattern, though, and it cost enough that I would likely pass on a jacket which required that much work.
post #29261 of 37408

Thanks, guys.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #29262 of 37408

Can tailors put functional buttonholes on a sleeve with relative ease? I'm thinking that way, you could get it shortened from the end and still have your buttonholes.

post #29263 of 37408
I'm pretty sure that all of SS's jackets come with functional sleeve buttons. Hence my question.

Cheers,

Ac
post #29264 of 37408
Quote:
Originally Posted by semperexcelsius View Post

Can tailors put functional buttonholes on a sleeve with relative ease? I'm thinking that way, you could get it shortened from the end and still have your buttonholes.

Have you read Ac's question?
post #29265 of 37408
I'm having the sleeves of a more casual cotton blazer shortened from the top and I believe my tailor said something about it necessitating the armholes coming up and being narrowed slightly, which makes sense given that sleeves are tapered. I supposed if there is extra fabric in the sleeve this may not be the case, but then you'd have to let some fabric out the whole way down I'd also assume. Shrug. I'm bad with 3D things.

I'll try to remember to ask him for more details when I go back to pick it up.
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