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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1889

post #28321 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post

...I seriously do think a lot of people could use some shoulder pads. They shouldn't be so vilified as they are at the moment.

 

Yep. I was in SuSu yesterday, trying on various suit blocks to see which ones fit me the best. Answer: Lazio, which has probably the most padded shoulder in their range, always works well for me. I don't have sloping shoulders, just narrow shoulders. I benefit from some shoulder extension. A soft, extended shoulder with no padding tends to droop laterally, so that extra padding really helps.

 

Of course an expert tailor can create a soft, extended shoulder with little or no padding which nevertheless won't droop. (I'm getting such a suit made up for me by B&T right now and will be posting the results soon.) But in medium price RTW, a bit of padding is probably a safer bet.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

I'm confused. Guys work out like mad to get sloped shoulders, but then get padded suits to make them look less sloped? confused.gif

 

I know, that's kinda dumb, isn't it? Mind you I don't think this applies to everyone. But certainly, overdeveloped traps are going to create a sloped look and fit problems in the shoulder area, unless delts are correspondingly large. \bodybuilding

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Never dress like Donald Trump. Also, never work for Donald Trump.

 

Seems you guys are all going to be working for Donald Trump soon enough.

post #28322 of 37396

Bosses
All of them Trumps...
post #28323 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by kulata View Post

Sloping shoulders only look bad, at least IMO, if hips are wide relative to shoulder width. Then we are verging on a feminine look but hey it's 2015. It doesn't matter biggrin.gif

I agree with Kulata. When your jacket starts to loose "shape" and make your upper body look like a potato or pear, then you probably need some structure in the shoulder. This is not to imply that those with a normal or "in shape" physique can't wear structured shoulders, I just think it generally comes off as more formal and business-like.
Personally I have moved to a much more natural, Neopolitan shoulder over the past couple of years. In part due to the influence of SF, but also in response to the more relaxed social and business climate as it relates to attire. I would much rather wear an unstructured jacket/suit than dress pants with a shirt and tie dans jacket (looks juvenile). I've seen guys in Ring Jacket, Boglioli and Canali's kei jacket look very appropriate at work.
post #28324 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by vida View Post
I've seen guys in Ring Jacket, Boglioli and Canali's kei jacket look very appropriate at work.

 

...skips joke about checking labels at work.

post #28325 of 37396
Ha, no doubt! But these are clothing aficionados...so we talk...
post #28326 of 37396

At the risk of stating the obvious, the shape of the shoulder padding is more important than the volume in whether it makes your shoulders look more square.

 

Also, I am shocked at the idea of professional firms banning the tie.  The end of days is nigh.

post #28327 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

At the risk of stating the obvious, the shape of the shoulder padding is more important than the volume in whether it makes your shoulders look more square.

 

Also, I am shocked at the idea of professional firms banning the tie.  The end of days is nigh.

 

I have clients that will specifically say ahead of a meeting, "make sure no one is wearing a tie."  Their organizations are business casual and have a rule that when they meet with others outside the organization they must dress at the same level of formality as the people they are meeting with.  They do not want to wear a tie, so they make sure no one else is either.

post #28328 of 37396
That's really weird. To each their own, I guess.

But yeah ... still weird.
post #28329 of 37396
Tyranny of the minority
post #28330 of 37396
Tiephobia. An irrational fear of neckties.

I wonder if they call their doctor in advance of their visit to dictate what he wears.
post #28331 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TM79 View Post

That's really weird. To each their own, I guess.

But yeah ... still weird.

 

It used to be, but it is happening more and more nowadays.  Sometimes it's fine, but other times the significance of the matters we're discussing or the people attending leave me a little uncomfortable not being fully suited up.  Interestingly, it's the largest organizations that do this the most.  The two worst offenders are a Fortune 50 and a Fortune 100 organization.  I should add this is only when they come to our offices, as I am always in a suit when I go to their offices. 

post #28332 of 37396
I definitely wouldn't have expected that last part, and I'm with you - I think I'd feel underdressed and need to push that thought out of my mind.
post #28333 of 37396
Apropos of nothing, I could use a bit of GNA. I'm most likely going to be moving from Chicago to one of the coasts soon. I'm wondering what the best way to transport a large wardrobe is. Those of you who have moved, do y'all just trust the movers to do their thing (knowing of course you can sue them if things get damaged) or are there specialty services for moving clothes? Any other random things I should consider?
post #28334 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

Apropos of nothing, I could use a bit of GNA. I'm most likely going to be moving from Chicago to one of the coasts soon. I'm wondering what the best way to transport a large wardrobe is. Those of you who have moved, do y'all just trust the movers to do their thing (knowing of course you can sue them if things get damaged) or are there specialty services for moving clothes? Any other random things I should consider?

 



There are specialty services for moving anything. However, surprisingly, people involved in one thing (antiques etc) might have no clue how to handle clothing. You could also spec out the exact materials you need from ULINE and pack. Also you can use TALAS in Brooklyn if you want archival materials and acid-free papers, etc. Also, this would be a good time to due a total overhaul of your wardrobe and have everything bench cleaned, pressed, buttons resewn and mended. You could send everything to Stu at Rave FabriCare and have the cleaned results sent to your new address in coffin boxes.

Is that to extreme? I get excited just thinking about it.
post #28335 of 37396
I would just pack it yourself. It's the packing that involves the risk, not the lifting and moving of wardrobe boxes. Unless your stuff is going into storage. That's different.
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