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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1696

post #25426 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post


At this point in my career, I unconsciously opt for maximum number of syllables.

I'm constantly surround by nonsense business-speak (who isn't looking for actionable opportunities using big data analytics, anyone?). As a result I find myself to becoming increasingly blunt.
post #25427 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

That's a tricky proposition in terms of a solid replication, for various factors (e.g. button placement to secure the collar points is not inconsequential either though you could move them later).

I can try later to give you something but won't be able to give you a diagram as above. Did you want measurements for both collars? Or just the Kamakura? I'll try to take measurements this evening.

Of course, since I think Kamakura is a standard, you might just buy a shirt from them. They are quite reasonable for the quality (better: go to their NYC store if it's nearby). 

Or: you might try the brokeandbespoke collar as that has the closest look to the kamakura. It's not bad and if you'd be happy with it, then it can serve as the basis for tweaking.

Last: ask in the Luxire thread if anyone has replicated the Kamakura. 

Thanks for helping out Tweeds

If you don't mind, measurements for both collars would be great

I am going to cross post in the luxire and look to see if Kamakura has been replicated.
post #25428 of 37396
Quote:

 

Bear in mind that lots of custom collars are made for that person. The broke and bespoke dude is 5'8", so if you're 6'2" the collar band might not be high enough for you. 

post #25429 of 37396
hmm good point. I used to be 6FT but now 5 11
post #25430 of 37396
Are those shirt choices decent?

What recs for the white dress shirt collar?
post #25431 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joenobody0 View Post

I haven't been paying too much attention to Luxire, but I've heard Kamakura mentioned many many many times. I'd be shocked if they hadn't copied ("replicated" sounds a bit high brow for what they do) it by now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post


At this point in my career, I unconsciously opt for maximum number of syllables.

I just try to not sound like a dick.
post #25432 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by jssdc View Post



I just try to not sound like a dick.

 

You'll never make it as an academic. Full disclosure: I'm an academic.

post #25433 of 37396
post #25434 of 37396
I'd say not. "Teacher" is what you have in high school or community college. "Academic" is something else.
post #25435 of 37396
Thread Starter 

I love research. I really, really do. But a lot of people I work with/around see quality research and quality teaching as something destined to be exclusive of each other. If you love teaching, you can't possibly love research. And vice versa. Drives me nuts. And this is why, when I have kids, and they are old enough for college, I don't want them going to a school that focuses heavily on research. For graduate school, yes. But not for undergraduate.

 

Professors are teachers. Some of them are shitty at it. Many of them are shitty at it. But they are teachers. They have students. They teach those students. They are teachers.

 

One day, when I am nice a tenured and have more grays in my hair than blonde, someone will ask me what I do for a living. I'll tell them I'm a teacher. When they ask where, I'll say XXXX university.

 

[I come from a very long line of teachers. My dad was a professor before he was a scientist; when he retires, he plans on teaching Latin and German at a private high school in town for peanuts. My mom's been a high school teacher for almost as long as I remember. My grandmother was a teacher all her life. My other grandmother was a teacher and later a principal. Both my aunts are teachers. My uncle is a professor...though a very research centric one and he probably views undergraduates and nuisances and graduates as cheap labor. My grandfather was a professor. I was born to teach. I have very strong views about teaching. Clearly. Oh, and Mrs. Claghorn is getting a masters in education right now to teach elementary school]

post #25436 of 37396

^^^ What he said. There is a world renowned archaeologist at my institution who works on the administrative side of the house. He doesn't have to teach classes but he does once a year anyway, because he loves students. Needless to say it was one of the best experiences I've had as a student.

post #25437 of 37396

Three professors in the field of economy at my college had gotten the Noble prizes for their works. However, I saw none of them teaching any classes. What the heck.

post #25438 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post
 

I love research. I really, really do. But a lot of people I work with/around see quality research and quality teaching as something destined to be exclusive of each other. If you love teaching, you can't possibly love research. And vice versa. Drives me nuts. And this is why, when I have kids, and they are old enough for college, I don't want them going to a school that focuses heavily on research. For graduate school, yes. But not for undergraduate.

 

Professors are teachers. Some of them are shitty at it. Many of them are shitty at it. But they are teachers. They have students. They teach those students. They are teachers.

 

One day, when I am nice a tenured and have more grays in my hair than blonde, someone will ask me what I do for a living. I'll tell them I'm a teacher. When they ask where, I'll say XXXX university.

 

[I come from a very long line of teachers. My dad was a professor before he was a scientist; when he retires, he plans on teaching Latin and German at a private high school in town for peanuts. My mom's been a high school teacher for almost as long as I remember. My grandmother was a teacher all her life. My other grandmother was a teacher and later a principal. Both my aunts are teachers. My uncle is a professor...though a very research centric one and he probably views undergraduates and nuisances and graduates as cheap labor. My grandfather was a professor. I was born to teach. I have very strong views about teaching. Clearly. Oh, and Mrs. Claghorn is getting a masters in education right now to teach elementary school]


Totally on board with all of this (well, not the family stuff, that would just be weird). I invest a huge amount of effort into my teaching; I also was trained as an elementary/primary school teacher and did that for a few years. Drives me nuts when some (certainly not all!) of my colleagues count students mostly as obstacles to their research.

post #25439 of 37396
Thread Starter 

And I bet your students benefit tremendously from that earlier experience and training.

post #25440 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post
 

And I bet your students benefit tremendously from that earlier experience and training.


I like to think they do, though I just returned marks to them and the amount of grumbling makes me think they might be having second thoughts!

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