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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1638

post #24556 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkside View Post

While I love KW and have ordered from him multiple times in the past, his suits start at about $850-900 while you can get one from SS at around $500.

I'm sure KW's quality is better, but that's not an insignificant price jump,especially if you are on a budget.

I don't know about KW, and I'm not sure I'd trust the suit suggestions of someone who just recently bought a pair of slacks, but at least the Wang stuff is full canvassed. A quick Google search shows some shitty MTM fits though.
Edited by Joenobody0 - 5/27/15 at 9:32am
post #24557 of 37392
Thread Starter 

Well, I'm in the process of getting my first KW suit (after ordering half his squares over the last couple of years). So we'll see how it ends up looking on me. Because if it looks good on me, it looks good on everybody. Clearly. Because that's how real shit works.

post #24558 of 37392

I would only do KW MTM if I had my measurements taken in person (in NY, by appointment). The ol' 'send us some photos and we'll figure out adjustments from there' approach didn't end well when I did MTM KW shirts

post #24559 of 37392
Thread Starter 

I do think it would behoove KW to provide a modest tailoring credit.

post #24560 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Well, I'm in the process of getting my first KW suit (after ordering half his squares over the last couple of years). So we'll see how it ends up looking on me. Because if it looks good on me, it looks good on everybody. Clearly. Because that's how real shit works.

It seemed like people who knew what they were doing had good results, and people who didn't... were iffy. I'm sure yours will be good, so I just bought one based on the future goodness of your purchase. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #24561 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

I do think it would behoove KW to provide a modest tailoring credit.

I was surprised to see that they didn't.
post #24562 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post
 

I do think it would behoove KW to provide a modest tailoring credit.

Or I would take their 'trial suit' to a decent tailor and pay to get their advice on what should be adjusted.

 

But yes, either way, the lack of tailoring credit is a bit mean.

post #24563 of 37392
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sebastian mcfox View Post
 

Or I would take their 'trial suit' to a decent tailor and pay to get their advice on what should be adjusted.


This is an excellent idea and one that should be advocated on the KW website. I'm trying to think of a reason that this wouldn't help improve consistency in results. I don't think it would preclude KW from also making his own judgment based on pictures. He'd just weigh them against what the tailor suggests.

 

@Kent Wang

post #24564 of 37392
Maybe it's just me, but I don't think tailoring credits are all that common at the price point Kent Wang offers. You get tailoring credits for Formosa from NMWA, but that's also a $2,000 RTW suit (and having tried them on and seen how nice they are in person, the $2,000 is a bargain already). I am sure a top English or Italian tailoring house offering MTM or delivery without fittings would offer a credit or pay to fix the issue, but again that's just what you expect at a certain price point. If I walked into Brooks Brothers to buy a suit, pretty much any alteration other than hemming and maybe taking the waist in a bit on the pants is going to be charged for (not true for MTM, but again you're looking at a minimum $1,500 for MTM during their MTM events and closer to $1,800 outside of one, plus the fitting is done in person).
post #24565 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Self help self wealth books make me shake my head in shame.

RANT (on an iPhone)

On a related note, I watched a presentation on Richard Kiyosaki by some students. Glorifying this idea that we should strive for wealth with the minimum amount of effort (and of course, part of the sales pitch is framing anyone who wants to work for a living as a chump--the part I felt was really abhorrent).

Growing up the child of two productive workaholics who also managed to be wonderful parents and now wonderful friends, I admittedly glorify hard work. I don't necessarily think it is its own reward, and I don't begrudge anyone the desire to get rich as quickly as possible with as little work as possible (work on average...so starting a business just so at some point you can step back from it, retire early, and enjoy the profits...the ideal I think this Kiyosaki guy advocates), but I do take some umbrage at this motivation being the primary impetus behind an individual's business/financial decisions. I think it speaks poorly of him/her.

But then again, both my parents are super hard workers (solar physicist and AP English teacher) and all four my grandparents worked all their lives (two high school principals, a lawyer and a farmer/businessman, with two being immigrants and one being one of those rags to riches stories you hear about...granted those riches came when she was in her late 50s/early 60's...and they came from property investment rather than hard work...but those investments were made in the hopes of security, not an easy life, and she continued teaching long after they started making returns). So this biases me.

Or maybe I'm just too American. I know we work like fiends over here, often with little to show in terms of added productivity (though we aren't anywhere near as bad as Koreans, though that's an unfair comparison since their organizational culture, specifically the reason for working long hours, is so very different from ours).

End rant.

@TheNoodles

And I hope you don't feel led astray. Those pants are perhaps the best fitting I've seen on you, particularly the thigh area.

But in general, I give very safe, uncontroversial advice.

Also, you still are very Noodles. How many times have I suggested you get a SuSu Lazio, and how many do you own?

 

I read an interesting BBC article the other day about how going to work and being at the office has become a ritual. We don't go to the office or stay late at the office to get work done, as being at the office has become a purpose in itself. We're not working, we're simply being at work, which has become society's most universally celebrated value. It quoted a study about how many people (can't remember the percentage) stay longer at the office just so they can inflate their hours and look like a hard working person, without actually doing more work.

 

When you start thinking about it, it's a ridiculous practice, and one I see everyday. If I leave before everyone else, even though there absolutely is no more work to be done, others will think I'm not a hard worker. So everyone tries to keep up with each other, which means people read books or newspapers or browse the internet in a really small browser window from 6PM-8PM, just so they can leave later and adhere to society's misguided values.

 

The practice of going to an office and spending 12 hours of your day there regardless of the amount of work is so hilariously outdated, but still we all adhere to it (except you academics I suppose). It's also quite depressing when you realise how many hours of your life you're wasting by trying to look busy at the office.

post #24566 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

Maybe it's just me, but I don't think tailoring credits are all that common at the price point Kent Wang offers. You get tailoring credits for Formosa from NMWA, but that's also a $2,000 RTW suit (and having tried them on and seen how nice they are in person, the $2,000 is a bargain already). I am sure a top English or Italian tailoring house offering MTM or delivery without fittings would offer a credit or pay to fix the issue, but again that's just what you expect at a certain price point. If I walked into Brooks Brothers to buy a suit, pretty much any alteration other than hemming and maybe taking the waist in a bit on the pants is going to be charged for (not true for MTM, but again you're looking at a minimum $1,500 for MTM during their MTM events and closer to $1,800 outside of one, plus the fitting is done in person).

On the one hand I agree with you. However, the combination of "take a picture and we will tell you what to change" plus "if our suggestions produce a bad result you can't return it" puts a lot of the risk onto the consumer. That's fine if the buyer knows what he's doing (or pays a good tailor to comment on fit), but I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it myself. I'd feel more comfortable with this value proposition where the risk shared via a modest tailoring credit. Formosa is $1,900 (after SF discount) and comes with a $140 credit. The KW stuff is about half that price in good fabrics, so a $70 credit doesn't seem unreasonable to me.
post #24567 of 37392
I know I'm jumping backwards but Mr Six there isn't a combination of what you posted that I didn't like. I know some said there are combos that are amazing and some that are workable. To me they all looked great. Just my 0.02
post #24568 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joenobody0 View Post

On the one hand I agree with you. However, the combination of "take a picture and we will tell you what to change" plus "if our suggestions produce a bad result you can't return it" puts a lot of the risk onto the consumer. That's fine if the buyer knows what he's doing (or pays a good tailor to comment on fit), but I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it myself. I'd feel more comfortable with this value proposition where the risk shared via a modest tailoring credit. Formosa is $1,900 (after SF discount) and comes with a $140 credit. The KW stuff is about half that price in good fabrics, so a $70 credit doesn't seem unreasonable to me.

I hear you, but KW's stuff is priced to viable at a given price point sans tailoring credit. Seems to me he'd have to raise prices to offer the credit, which, while it might give the optics of risk sharing, defeats the purpose. I think it's up to each person to decide if the risk is worth it at a particular price point.
post #24569 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post
 

 

I read an interesting BBC article the other day about how going to work and being at the office has become a ritual. We don't go to the office or stay late at the office to get work done, as being at the office has become a purpose in itself. We're not working, we're simply being at work, which has become society's most universally celebrated value. It quoted a study about how many people (can't remember the percentage) stay longer at the office just so they can inflate their hours and look like a hard working person, without actually doing more work.

 

When you start thinking about it, it's a ridiculous practice, and one I see everyday. If I leave before everyone else, even though there absolutely is no more work to be done, others will think I'm not a hard worker. So everyone tries to keep up with each other, which means people read books or newspapers or browse the internet in a really small browser window from 6PM-8PM, just so they can leave later and adhere to society's misguided values.

 

The practice of going to an office and spending 12 hours of your day there regardless of the amount of work is so hilariously outdated, but still we all adhere to it (except you academics I suppose). It's also quite depressing when you realise how many hours of your life you're wasting by trying to look busy at the office.

 

In IB, this is called "face time". Even though you aren't working, you stay late and show that you are 'committed' or whatever shit it is. Sometimes management comes in to see who is staying or  not. If they're really hardcore, they'll come back 15 minutes after they check (to see if someone left right after they check)

post #24570 of 37392
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

 

In IB, this is called "face time". Even though you aren't working, you stay late and show that you are 'committed' or whatever shit it is. Sometimes management comes in to see who is staying or  not. If they're really hardcore, they'll come back 15 minutes after they check (to see if someone left right after they check)

 

Yep, I'm in IB.

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