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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1511

post #22651 of 37428

It's quite funny how I am at where I am right now given that I worked at Prudential while in college. Saw a lot of regular folks contributing to their accounts and just making that cash pile for retirement bigger and bigger.

post #22652 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

Also matching up to 5% of base pay, a.k.a. free money, from my employer (Uncle Sam). icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

One of the few things I love about working for the man. I don't see it lasting much longer, at least not at that percentage.
post #22653 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

It's quite funny how I am at where I am right now given that I worked at Prudential while in college. Saw a lot of regular folks contributing to their accounts and just making that cash pile for retirement bigger and bigger.

Not the smartest thing to do, but you're young, you'll be fine.
post #22654 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

 

I'm so excited for the food on this trip. CANNOT WAIT!

 

Sabjis, pakoras, chapatis, and my favorite: mint chutney! My wife is a small town girl from a very white town but she made herself learn how to cook excellent Indian food. I know as an Indian you are probably skeptical, most Indians don't trust Indian food made by white people lol. But I'm telling you, it's amazing.

post #22655 of 37428
Anybody have investments outside of a retirement account? I keep wanting to open up a Fidelity or Vanguard index fund, but see all my money go toward mortgage, living expenses, clothing, and travel.
post #22656 of 37428

Max out 401K, deferred comp, and IRA.

 

Direct deposit specific amount every month into investment account that isn't tax benefited.

 

Pay mortgage and bills.

 

Play with the rest.

 

post #22657 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

 

Sabjis, pakoras, chapatis, and my favorite: mint chutney! My wife is a small town girl from a very white town but she made herself learn how to cook excellent Indian food. I know as an Indian you are probably skeptical, most Indians don't trust Indian food made by white people lol. But I'm telling you, it's amazing.

 

Hah. Yeah, the indian food will be good. I'm mostly excited for the street food tbh.

Though, I'm super psyched for food in thailand!

post #22658 of 37428

pad thai...dragonball noodles...thai ice tea...tom yum goong...chicken curry...

post #22659 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

Hah. Yeah, the indian food will be good. I'm mostly excited for the street food tbh.


Do NOT drink the water they have for pani puris from the side of the road, unless you want to spend a good chunk of your trip near the nearest restroom. I was in New Dehli about two weeks ago and only drank bottled water for the time I was there.
post #22660 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

^That makes sense. Then again there was the Itaewon taco restaurant that we went to that was started up by KAs who I believe you said had good ed background. I guess I can make it into an American firm as an "AICPA" but that's not what I want to do. Can I play the game in Apgujung or Cheongdam despite my 2nd tier background or can my work experience help in marketing myself? I believe if I wanted to make 6 figures playing this gig, I'd have to teach long hours and multiple classes, right? I'll get my wife thru school here and she can make the big $$$ while I test the waters. But I don't want the life of long hours of work in a competitive environment. I bet them Gangnam mothers want RESULTS!

Nope. Just as expensive if not more. Transportation is cleaner and better, actually the entire city is cleaner and better. 

Sorry, but can this be translated for the uninitiated? I'm assuming that what you're all talking about is teaching at elite private schools in the richest areas of Korea to parents obsessed with what they perceive to be "the best."

I'm sure this is great if you're really in it for the money, but it doesn't really sound like you would be if you got into the teaching thing (as you say somewhere else on here).

I dunno, I teach middle class kids in a neighbourhood that is mostly (~85%?) recent immigrants in BC. I have a hard time picturing elite private education, so earning that kind of money to basically "drill and kill" english classes seems painful at best. Curriculum design could be interesting, but I'm assuming that exploratory and inquiry-based education wouldn't be something they're looking for.
post #22661 of 37428
Thread Starter 

Actually, some of those kids are the best to teach. I generally refused to teach standardized test prep (which is where the real money is at...150 an hour+), though I ended up writing analysis programs for various SAT camps around Seoul.

 

But back to those kids. Most of their parents have realized that their kids need more than just grades and extracurriculars and have begun valuing a holistic approach to teaching. I worked at a couple private institutes. I largely taught economics to high school and college kids. Not, like, AP economics, but stuff like the history of economics or developmental economics. Very liberal arts style classes. I also taught a lot of history at these places. I once taught a class on literary anthropology and Greek/Roman classics. They were. by and large, super motivated. At that level, nobody was there because they were forced to be there.

 

And I did a lot of really great classes independently, especially over summers. I had a bunch of mini-courses (6-8 sessions) on really narrow subjects targeted at Korean high school kids coming home from boarding school abroad. Stuff like Cold War literature, or a class on the Holocaust. Two separate courses on Orwell!

 

Also designed and sold courses to other institutes.

 

Anyway, it was a really rewarding experience as an educator.

post #22662 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

Haha, are you certain it's a holiday? From what I've heard, the curriculum is pretty tough and there will be countless hours prepping for class material. Paying $200k sucks, but the real value is $200K plus the two years of foregoing work, which can be another $300k+ (assuming $150k pretax). 

It's really very easy for a post-grad program. I forgot to submit half the assignments in one of my classes, didn't study for the final, and received an A+. This was a top 3 MBA program.
post #22663 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkside View Post


Do NOT drink the water they have for pani puris from the side of the road, unless you want to spend a good chunk of your trip near the nearest restroom. I was in New Dehli about two weeks ago and only drank bottled water for the time I was there.


On the flip side...best diet ever. Also generally avoid any street treats that involve ice or rabri, just to be safe. My dad (born in India) just had to push his limits the last time we went as a family... It's a fun time though. Roadside sandwiches are great, but maybe my favorite roadside meals have been pav bhaji while visiting Mount Abu as a kid. Hot, buttery bread, spicy vegetables, can't go wrong.

post #22664 of 37428
:slayer:Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post
 

pad thai...dragonball noodles...thai ice tea...tom yum goong...chicken curry...


Tom Sam. 

post #22665 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Actually, some of those kids are the best to teach. I generally refused to teach standardized test prep (which is where the real money is at...150 an hour+), though I ended up writing analysis programs for various SAT camps around Seoul.

But back to those kids. Most of their parents have realized that their kids need more than just grades and extracurriculars and have begun valuing a holistic approach to teaching. I worked at a couple private institutes. I largely taught economics to high school and college kids. Not, like, AP economics, but stuff like the history of economics or developmental economics. Very liberal arts style classes. I also taught a lot of history at these places. I once taught a class on literary anthropology and Greek/Roman classics. They were. by and large, super motivated. At that level, nobody was there because they were forced to be there.

And I did a lot of really great classes independently, especially over summers. I had a bunch of mini-courses (6-8 sessions) on really narrow subjects targeted at Korean high school kids coming home from boarding school abroad. Stuff like Cold War literature, or a class on the Holocaust. Two separate courses on Orwell!

Also designed and sold courses to other institutes.

Anyway, it was a really rewarding experience as an educator.

Yeah that actually sounds really great. I'm restricted to teaching "English" or "Social Studies" because that's all the public schools really offer but I've made myself a bit of a job creating and running the Information Technology program, which for high school kids is very, very basic. I have very little experience with the kinds of kids you're describing- the ones who actually want to be in school. I'm sure I'd really enjoy that. I'm kind of tired fighting the apathy.

What was your major, Clags? Did you get an education degree as well?
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