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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1508

post #22606 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post


I started teaching for the money and the power but stayed for the short commute.

I didn't go the teaching route because of the money...:teach:

post #22607 of 37428

Money is a wonderful thing. I love money. But one thing I can't imagine is living your life around it. I've been pretty poor and as bad as it was, it's not as bad as doing something I don't want to do with my life.

post #22608 of 37428

Edited by The Noodles - 4/24/15 at 9:48am
post #22609 of 37428
Thread Starter 
I and a number of people I know made six figures in teaching and other education related careers in Seoul*

And we didn't have to pay taxes on most of it ^_^

* It took a lot of work, a lot of luck, and a lot of networking, especially if you don't have an Ivy League degree. Very low six figures was probably the max I'd ever be able to make doing what I did there since I didn't graduate from an Ivy League school. I capped out pretty quickly.
post #22610 of 37428

You're white, I am not. Hahgwons don't want to hire people like me in korea.

post #22611 of 37428
Thread Starter 
I was one of two white people I knew earning that kind of money (the other is also on SF btw).

Everyone else was Korean American.
post #22612 of 37428

But I am thinking more of just going to a rural part of the country and just teaching at an elementary school. I mean, Gangnam mothers wouldn't want me teaching their kids. I went to a 2 tier school. They want Ivy League grads, then again why would an Ivy League grad be doing that...

post #22613 of 37428
Thread Starter 
Apgu/Cheongdam is where the real money is at (teaching Korean-American kids AP subjects). Daechi is good for decent pay, but you'll struggle to get more than 70 an hour there.

Yeah, another guy (Korean-American U Maryland CP) and myself were the only two people I knew of that went to 2 tier schools and were still able--barely--to keep up with the Ivy League guys*

I got into the game late in my stay in Seoul. I wish I had started much earlier.

Rural areas...yeah, you'll struggle to make 30k. Still, there are other things to do besides teach if you've got the right connections (curriculum and test design, for example; something I've been able to do remotely)


* I think history was a super common major among Ivy League grads working in Seoul. Probably getting some of the best money one can with an undergraduate history degree. Knew some others with fine arts degrees as well. But I also knew a guy from Harvard with a JD and another with an MBA. They left those fields simply because they hated them and loved teaching.
post #22614 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post
 Knew some others with fine arts degrees as well. But I also knew a guy from Harvard with a JD and another with an MBA. They left those fields simply because they hated them and loved teaching.

 

I'm sure the money didn't hurt matters either. 

 

I'm guessing 100K goes a lot further in Seoul than NYC.

post #22615 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Apgu/Cheongdam is where the real money is at (teaching Korean-American kids AP subjects). Daechi is good for decent pay, but you'll struggle to get more than 70 an hour there.

Yeah, another guy (Korean-American U Maryland CP) and myself were the only two people I knew of that went to 2 tier schools and were still able--barely--to keep up with the Ivy League guys*

I got into the game late in my stay in Seoul. I wish I had started much earlier.

Rural areas...yeah, you'll struggle to make 30k. Still, there are other things to do besides teach if you've got the right connections (curriculum and test design, for example; something I've been able to do remotely)


* I think history was a super common major among Ivy League grads working in Seoul. Probably getting some of the best money one can with an undergraduate history degree. Knew some others with fine arts degrees as well. But I also knew a guy from Harvard with a JD and another with an MBA. They left those fields simply because they hated them and loved teaching.

^That makes sense. Then again there was the Itaewon taco restaurant that we went to that was started up by KAs who I believe you said had good ed background. I guess I can make it into an American firm as an "AICPA" but that's not what I want to do. Can I play the game in Apgujung or Cheongdam despite my 2nd tier background or can my work experience help in marketing myself? I believe if I wanted to make 6 figures playing this gig, I'd have to teach long hours and multiple classes, right? I'll get my wife thru school here and she can make the big $$$ while I test the waters. But I don't want the life of long hours of work in a competitive environment. I bet them Gangnam mothers want RESULTS!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

 

I'm sure the money didn't hurt matters either. 

 

I'm guessing 100K goes a lot further in Seoul than NYC.

 

Nope. Just as expensive if not more. Transportation is cleaner and better, actually the entire city is cleaner and better. 


Edited by The Noodles - 4/24/15 at 9:22am
post #22616 of 37428
Thread Starter 
@rtc
Those two made waaayyyyyyy more than 100k. Also both New Yorkers, oddly enough

@Noodles
Work experience probably helps. But so does teaching experience. And the most important thing, unfortunately, is knowing the right people.

But you're right. Mothers want results and it is super, super competitive. One of the reasons I tried to stay design side as much as possible.
post #22617 of 37428

It's so weird to me that people still care about where people went to college after a certain point. 

post #22618 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

It's so weird to me that people still care about where people went to college after a certain point. 


Some fields more than others, I think. If you stay in academics then that sh*t follows you forever. I get the impression that in business it's different. Ivy League degrees still count for something, just not as much as they used to. My wife does very well and she got her MBA at a small religious school. Sometimes people mistake it for an online degree, although she is quick to correct them, heh.

post #22619 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post
@Noodles
Work experience probably helps. But so does teaching experience. And the most important thing, unfortunately, is knowing the right people.

But you're right. Mothers want results and it is super, super competitive. One of the reasons I tried to stay design side as much as possible.

Okay. With 10 years under my belt as a CPA, I am not about to jump into Gangnam style teaching. If I am going to teach, I am still headed to the rural areas. If I am not going to teach, then I am just gonna continue to work as a CPA in Seoul. I'll probably take a big hit in base salary but taxes are lower, I bet. AND NO MORTGAGE! It's a rape and pillage here for me. 

 

The connections. My uncle still has his Hagwon and knows a bunch of people. He doesn't teach but just hires cheap young kids with good school background. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
 

It's so weird to me that people still care about where people went to college after a certain point. 

Ugh...Koreans are so superficial. It is super competitive there due to limited number of jobs vs candidates. So where you go to school is really really really important. Also, the society is built in that they favor candidates from their own schools. It's just ridiculous over there. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 


Some fields more than others, I think. If you stay in academics then that sh*t follows you forever. I get the impression that in business it's different. Ivy League degrees still count for something, just not as much as they used to. My wife does very well and she got her MBA at a small religious school. Sometimes people mistake it for an online degree, although she is quick to correct them, heh.

 

I is so~~~ glad my experience and my prof. designation allows me to ditch my 2nd tier college.

post #22620 of 37428
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post
 

I is so~~~ glad my experience and my prof. designation allows me to ditch my 2nd tier college.

 

How do you mean? You just don't list your education on a resume?

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