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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1503

post #22531 of 37405
Oil & Gas isn't doing to well atm in the US, and will likely get worse over the next few years. However, long term you should be fine (next 20 years, who knows what happens after that). If you like the energy sector you should definitely go into oil & gas. Maybe try getting an internship to see whether you like it?

Anyways, pick something you like and can make enough to easily pay off any college debts you'll have.

For me, I absolutely love car design, but I wouldnt be able to make a living with it, so I chose my second biggest passion, which is finance. Luckily, finance pays well, so that works out well.

I don't know how much a menswear buyer makes or what the career trajectory is, but I'm sure others could chime in. I'd say experience is more important than education for any business, so try networking and getting an internship there as well. Just cold email people and then call them if they agree to call, ask friends, whatever. You'd be amazed how far you can get by doing that. I mainly managed to get one of the 50 available positions out of 12,000 applications by doing that. So don't overestimate your competition.
post #22532 of 37405
aglose (Click to show)
I think CM is right. It all depends on so many different aspects though. Are you a good networker/natural salesman? In that case you could probably visit all the business events/fairs/fashion weeks/et c, available and talk your way into your dream job with "only" a bachelor. If you're more of a quiet academic type, who'd rather let your merits get you there, you should probably keep on getting your masters and maybe consider that other program.

I've met a few people in the business who are entirely "self made" (i.e. they haven't even got a college degree). I think you should at least get a bachelor though, so you have that to fall back on, and maybe keep on studying later on for a master (or PHD) if the textile thing doesn't pan out.
post #22533 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post

Oil & Gas isn't doing to well atm in the US, and will likely get worse over the next few years. However, long term you should be fine (next 20 years, who knows what happens after that). If you like the energy sector you should definitely go into oil & gas. Maybe try getting an internship to see whether you like it?

Anyways, pick something you like and can make enough to easily pay off any college debts you'll have.

For me, I absolutely love car design, but I wouldnt be able to make a living with it, so I chose my second biggest passion, which is finance. Luckily, finance pays well, so that works out well.

I don't know how much a menswear buyer makes or what the career trajectory is, but I'm sure others could chime in. I'd say experience is more important than education for any business, so try networking and getting an internship there as well. Just cold email people and then call them if they agree to call, ask friends, whatever. You'd be amazed how far you can get by doing that. Don't overestimate your competition.
I have a fantastic internship lined up this summer with one of my connections in oil and gas. I'm really excited to learn more about the industry and experience some different company cultures.

Thank you for the advice and I will start asking around to see what I can find.
post #22534 of 37405

post #22535 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by aglose View Post

I have a fantastic internship lined up this summer with one of my connections in oil and gas. I'm really excited to learn more about the industry and experience some different company cultures.

Thank you for the advice and I will start asking around to see what I can find.

Look on LinkedIn, company websites, whatever. If you send nice enough and short enough emails maybe 2 or 3 out of 10 will respond. Ask for a 5 minute call and have some intelligent questions prepared. Try to make them talk about themselves, because people love doing that. Have a quick 30 sec introduction prepared about who you are/why you're interested in menswear/why you're the best man for the job. If the call went well you can ask them if they know anything about internships/open positions. Alway send a thank you email, say what part of the conversation you found particularly interesting and maybe a follow up question about that. Keep in touch with people, send a 2-3 sentence update every 3 months or so. You should easily by able to land yourself a job in nearly any industry like that. Don't forget stay personable and natural, don't be a robot! After all, menswear is one of your main interests.

Congrats on the internship!
post #22536 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyface View Post

Look on LinkedIn, company websites, whatever. If you send nice enough and short enough emails maybe 2 or 3 out of 10 will respond. Ask for a 5 minute call and have some intelligent questions prepared. Try to make them talk about themselves, because people love doing that. Have a quick 30 sec introduction prepared about who you are/why you're interested in menswear/why you're the best man for a job. If the call went well you can ask them if he knows anything about internships/open positions. Always send a thank you email, say what party if the conversation you found particularly interesting and maybe a follow up question about that. Keep in touch with people, send a 2-3 sentence update every 3 months or so. You should easily by able to land yourself a job in nearly any industry like that. Don't forget stay personable and natural, don't be a robot! After all, menswear is one of your main interests.
Great advice thank you. I've sent a few messages via LinkedIn but haven't had the time to sit down and do a good job of it. Once this semester is over I will sit down and see if I can get some information.
post #22537 of 37405
Work before the masters, especially an MBA: you will get more out of it when you know,what you need from it.
post #22538 of 37405

There 2 ways of getting an MBA from the way I see it.  

 

I. Build up your career. 

   Have 5 to 8 years of solid experience.

   When you feel like you are about to hit the glass ceiling, get it. 

   Upon getting your MBA, you'll most likely have access to senior mgmt roles.

 

II. Go to an Ivy League school MBA program straight out of undergrad.

    Upon graduation, go work at Wall St.

post #22539 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post



I presume this is guidance on how to accessorize mid-blue and lighter suits. And it's good guidance.

@aglose, there are several people in the clothing industry who regularly contribute to this thread and others. A few well placed PMs should give you a better idea of how to pursue the textiles career.
post #22540 of 37405
Thread Starter 
I'd consider that closer to mid blue than light.
post #22541 of 37405

Yes, it's a saturated medium blue linen 

 

post #22542 of 37405
Thread Starter 
and beautiful
post #22543 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

There 2 ways of getting an MBA from the way I see it.  

I. Build up your career. 
   Have 5 to 8 years of solid experience.
   When you feel like you are about to hit the glass ceiling, get it. 
   Upon getting your MBA, you'll most likely have access to senior mgmt roles.

II. Go to an Ivy League school MBA program straight out of undergrad.
    Upon graduation, go work at Wall St.

You don't need an MBA for Wall Street.
post #22544 of 37405
True. Lots of engineer majors go.
post #22545 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

This morning I had a wild notion of completely revamping my wardrobe. All suits, all the same cut, each a different color. Nothing vibrant, but orange, green, purple, blue, brown, gold, red, etc. All worn with a white shirt and black tie. A non-uniform uniform, if you will.

Umwat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonRaphael View Post

Something about this tie speaks to me Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Am I totally insane trying to convince myself to purchase it? I'm thinking light grey flannel trousers, light blue shirt, navy wool (odd) vest, rich dark brown sport coat.

If you have managed to hold off so far, please continue doing so. smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

I am sooooooooooooooo copying this!

Lol no your not. I mean, you could, but you wont. wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

I'd consider that closer to mid blue than light.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

and beautiful

Agree to both.

I think that a light blue jacket looks super awesome with even lighter gray pants, like in the Cox example.
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