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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1338

post #20056 of 37405
To be honest, I think that too small and short jackets that are pulling everywhere only exaggerate your features.

They make you look like you're bursting out of them, and even though the jackets themselves are not V shaped, it is obvious you are v shaped from the way the jacket is pulling in certain places.

Because you want a jacket that is as tight as possible, it is only natural that it follows the lines of your body. If you want to play around with silhouettes, you'll have to go with a jacket that is slightly bigger than you are, so that a tailor can freely add and subtract fabric in certain places. Needless to say, you'll need an experienced tailor for this.

Also, I just don't like the way you're using colour, and this has nothing to do with classic, not classic or gender roles. You tend to use a lot of creams, yellows and beige, in the same fit even, and that just looks bad on you. You'll have to look into which colours look best with your skin tone.
post #20057 of 37405

Just off the top of my head, Iso: classic country styles for ladies are very much derivative of their male equivalents, leading to an interesting androgyny of their own that is nevertheless classic: I'm thinking specifically of things like hunting/riding/shooting jackets, boots, jodphurs, etc.  Female military and militaresque uniforms are also interesting, perhaps: buttoned tunics, epaulets and the like derived from the male standard, but the former worn longer, the latter softer or more ornate.  There is a lot of fun to be had here.

 

Then in the other direction, male classics that have been more recently absorbed into female fashion: plus fours, for instance, becoming the girls' "pedal pushers" of the eighties.  And taking that back another step, other items of more antique classic menswear that might today be considered more effeminate: frock coats, hosiery, big buckles, ruffed shirts.

 

I think that your journey to find a classic, tailored style that reflects your own identity is fascinating.  I look forward to future installments.  Anyway, even as a fairy vanilla XY type: who doesn't love a frock coat?

post #20058 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

Anyway, even as a fairy vanilla XY type

 

Freud would have a field day.

post #20059 of 37405

That's too good to even correct. :lol:

 

Though considering your choice of online alter ego, I think you should probably give Uncle Sigmund a wide berth!

post #20060 of 37405

There are lots of images relevant to the current topic to be found in this thread:

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/393893/menswear-on-women

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #20061 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

There are lots of images relevant to the current topic to be found in this thread:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/393893/menswear-on-women


icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

tumblr_ngc1m0SGcN1qhwwz0o1_1280.jpg
post #20062 of 37405

Yesssssss

post #20063 of 37405

It is, of course, somewhat less controversial for women to wear men's clothes.

post #20064 of 37405

I should add that in addition to relevant images there's also some intelligent discussion in that thread, especially regarding the extent to which both 'menswear' and 'womenswear' are historical constructions and hence are variable, not constant.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #20065 of 37405
Oh I want to address one point. I don't actually like short jackets. In fact my DB is probably cut a bit longer than as considered normal now. I think the trousers I had gave that impression on some of my jackets.

Anyway I actually really like longer coats, like the one I just posted, but specifcly trenchcoats. I like the way they drape, the way they flow, dress-like. In general I have a lot of my jacket get a decent amount of skirt flare; I first saw it on a Huntsman jacket and fell in love with the silhouette it created, and I see a similarity in what I like in trenches and the way I wear them. Will post pic soon. I'm very interested in getting a linen trench. I know trenches are meant for rain so it makes no sense but I really want to wear longer things and all year round and not be too weird so trenches are the best bet.

Also I might add that's why I like a swell in the chest it accentuates I feel the silhouette I want. Maybe I just wish I had breasts tongue.gif but unless I get surgery/prosthetics I think I'll have to make do with a swell,
post #20066 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isolation View Post

Oh I want to address one point. I don't actually like short jackets. In fact my DB is probably cut a bit longer than as considered normal now. I think the trousers I had gave that impression on some of my jackets.

Anyway I actually really like longer coats, like the one I just posted, but specifcly trenchcoats. I like the way they drape, the way they flow, dress-like. In general I have a lot of my jacket get a decent amount of skirt flare; I first saw it on a Huntsman jacket and fell in love with the silhouette it created, and I see a similarity in what I like in trenches and the way I wear them. Will post pic soon. I'm very interested in getting a linen trench. I know trenches are meant for rain so it makes no sense but I really want to wear longer things and all year round and not be too weird so trenches are the best bet.

Also I might add that's why I like a swell in the chest it accentuates I feel the silhouette I want. Maybe I just wish I had breasts tongue.gif but unless I get surgery/prosthetics I think I'll have to make do with a swell,

 

I know you're just riffing now, but really, breast implants are not a great idea for a guy, for various technical reasons. In a nutshell, they will never look remotely "real" and feel even less so.

 

Of course, we are all in charge of our own bodies and can do what we like with them. But everyone has a responsibility to their future self. This is an underrated consideration.

post #20067 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

That's too good to even correct. :lol:

 

Though considering your choice of online alter ego, I think you should probably give Uncle Sigmund a wide berth!

 

Oh, I'm sure the good burgers of Coxsackie NY on the Hudson River, would disagree with you.

 

OTOH perhaps they're all mad. I certainly am.

post #20068 of 37405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

 

Oh, I'm sure the good burgers of Coxsackie NY on the Hudson River, would disagree with you.

 

OTOH perhaps they're all mad. I certainly am.

 

Up the dose for my Australian friend, please, and easy on the mashed bananas.  You're a breath of fresh air, matey.

 

@Isolation I get why you like trench coats: you're kind of a trench coat shape, and it's both a very masculine concept in origin, yet striking and angular on a feminine form.  I can see it on you for sure.  And further to that, and my previous suggestion of frock coats/longer jackets: some ladies' wear inspired by menswear that makes me think Isolationwear.

 

 

P.S. I think the woman in the suit above looks ridiculous; the trousers don't flatter at all.

post #20069 of 37405

Yeah. I think suit trousers for women these days often are designed around heels which, while I think heels are great and not necessarily incompatable with women in menswear, are not always the best choice, and it's limiting to begin menswear on women by just smashing tropes from two fashion perspective (menswear and womenswear) together without really working on how the elements work together. Seeing a woman in skimpy heels and a tweed 3 piece just looks weird and makes no sense, just as loafers and tweed would (often) be somewhat incongruous here.

 

I really do like those coats, yes!

post #20070 of 37405

:foo:


Edited by The Noodles - 3/11/15 at 1:50pm
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