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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1179

post #17671 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

Good teachers + good pupils = good progress

There is a joke in here, but Im too tired to find it.

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Helden, that first one is perfection.

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Noodles, how could anyone take issue with your wife? She is truly a lovely person. I mean, you guys were at my store for all of a half an hour maybe, but the impression she gave was beyond reproach.
post #17672 of 37396
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murlsquirl View Post

If he didn't have baby feet, I would send him black and brown. Bummer.


My grandmother used to call them "aristocratic feet," thank you very much. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murlsquirl View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post


My grandmother used to call them "aristocratic feet," thank you very much. 

That just makes no dang sense.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murlsquirl View Post


That just makes no dang sense.

 

Small feet are useful in a ballroom, I suppose.  Or something like that. 

 

 

 

The men in those fashion plates from the 19th and early 20th centuries (including the ones by Fellowes et al. from the 1930s often cited in current "classic menswear" on-line discourse) always have tiny feet, so it must have been an aesthetic ideal for a quite lengthy period of time.

 

post #17673 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

So he's gotten two offers (he messaged me as thanks for linking him).

Just wanted to comment that this thread really brings out the best in people, really attracts the best people, or both.

 

Yes, and then there's also me!

post #17674 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celadon View Post

 

The men in those fashion plates from the 19th and early 20th centuries (including the ones by Fellowes et al. from the 1930s often cited in current "classic menswear" on-line discourse) always have tiny feet, so it must have been an aesthetic ideal for a quite lengthy period of time.

 

I wonder how much of this may have been influenced by the Chinese foot-binding practice prevalent in the late 19th and early 20th century.

 

Yes, it was only done to women. But "chinoiserie" as a cultural meme was very strong during the late Victorian period. The line drawing posted above really reminds me of Chinese bound feet, in addition to its overt feminisation of the male physique. I wonder.

post #17675 of 37396
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

Noodles, how could anyone take issue with your wife? She is truly a lovely person. I mean, you guys were at my store for all of a half an hour maybe, but the impression she gave was beyond reproach.
Thanks, dude. Jealous has turned into hatred, it seems.

She always says, "Why can't you dress more like him?" when we talk about clothes.
post #17676 of 37396
Thread Starter 
Y'all should message him. I tried seeing if I could send him some ties, but he appears to be set there.

Again, you guys are all awesome for helping out.
Edited by Claghorn - 1/18/15 at 8:38am
post #17677 of 37396

As a follow-up to the discussion about patterned shirts, is anyone interested in their thoughts on patterned trousers?

 

I've seen a number of cases where I thought both Glen plaid and houndstooth trousers worked very nicely (sorry, no pics at hand).  Top half had to be dark(-er) and the jacket solid; a contrasting light v-neck sweater can be a nice addition.

 

On the other hand, at this point in US history I think striped odd trousers will almost always be seen as orphans.  Things may be different in the UK, where there was always a more established tradition of striped odd trousers.

 

What are the thoughts of the cognoscenti?

 

Thanks.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #17678 of 37396
Thread Starter 
Generally a bad idea, but there are always exceptions. Super small scale is safer.



post #17679 of 37396

It's a joke because I don't even have a black pair of oxfords, some Londoner I am, so I don't think I can really help anyone with interview clothes, but I do want to help. I was trying to give away some of my stuff to people who need things on tumblr but I have all of 200 followers so I didn't get much response. Anyway looks like this guy got some help, which is great. =]

post #17680 of 37396

Patterned trousers are a good look, but everything up top has to be conservative.  I think houndstooth and herringbone trousers are pretty common and effectively read as solids a lot of the time.  Glen plaids are more adventurous but still tasteful. 

 

I tried that look a couple of weeks ago, and it's not really me, but I don't hate it in principle.  (Yes, Noodles, the thighs on these should be tapered!). 

 

post #17681 of 37396
Patterned trousers have their place but are less versatile than solids as (generally) you can wear solid trousers with both solid and patterned jackets but patterned trousers are best with a solid jacket. Smaller scale patterns are generally easier to pull off. Care should also be taken to ensure said trousers do not look like orphans (most stripes are out, probably a lot of windowpanes too).
post #17682 of 37396
Great fit
post #17683 of 37396

I think a subtle PoW Gray can double as your usual gray trousers exactly to add a bit more variety to the bottom block in a subtle way. I've only done it once but it resolves into a solid from distance anyway, so I think it's perfect for a navy blazer really.

post #17684 of 37396

A couple of Glen plaid examples below.  In neither photo is the pattern obvious, unfortunately (or fortunately).  To follow-up my initial post, amongst other already mentioned constraints I think it’s safest when everything else in the fit is familiar to the point of cliché, as it is here, so that it comes across as just a slight variation on an already widely approved fit.

 

Stanley Van Buren from the Epaulet thread:

 

 

Urban Composition:

 

 

 

Cheers,

 

Ac

post #17685 of 37396

That UC fit is spot-on perfect.  I think Timotune has featured glen plaids successfully a few times, too, but I can't find the fits I'm thinking of at the moment. 

 

[Edit: While looking for Timo's fit, I found this one by DerekS.  Little bit lower contrast than the others, but I still think it works:]

 


Edited by heldentenor - 1/18/15 at 10:19am
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