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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe) - Page 1063

post #15931 of 37482

I think I might get another one when I go to Seoul in a couple of months. 

post #15932 of 37482
No B&T fitting????
post #15933 of 37482

I am going to nomanwearhouse for that!

post #15934 of 37482
Srs, I thought you were meeting up at B&T with @Claghorn...
post #15935 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post

Um...I thought my mother talking about me & my having babies was awkward. This beats it by miles. 

I was talking to an old friend of my during lunch.
He complimented me on my suit and he asked me how much the suit was.
I told him that it was x thousand dollars. 
He told me that it doesn't make sense for someone like me, just an accountant, to be wearing such expensive suits while working at a think tank.
It was more insulting since it came from an unemployed student who was still living off of his parents at age past 30. 
Does he have a point?

In general I would not be taking advice from unemployed 30-somethings who are living off their parents long-term about pretty much anything. You work in an environment that requires a suit and care about owning quality things. Nothing wrong with that. I don't see how your profession or place of employment is relevant at all unless you're bankrupting yourself to get nice clothes, which - based on what seems to be a good head on your shoulders (sans the occasional picnic attack) and your plan to slowly build a wardrobe over time - you are not. I agree with others who said your mistake was answering his question in the first place. It's very tacky to ask something like that.
post #15936 of 37482
If it's a close friend I don't have any secrets about the cost of stuff I get, and I would ask them about the price if they had bought something I liked and would also like to get ahold of. I think the rude-o-meter goes up depending on how distant an acquaintance we're talking about.

What I wouldn't do though, is to judge them on how they choose to spend the money they've earned. A friend doesn't do that.
post #15937 of 37482

While living across the pond, the biggest difference I found between Americans and Europeans (yes, I am being very general here, but it has been my experience) was the Europeans would spend more on clothing and accessories (quality over quantity) but live in relatively small apartments/houses (relative to American standards).  Renting also seemed to be the norm over owning.  Yet, Americans will tend to frown upon the expensive clothing and accessories while maxing themselves out monetarily to buy large homes with more space than they need.

post #15938 of 37482
Hmm, in Stockholm I would definitely say the trend is to own rather than rent. OTOH we do exist in Europe's periphery.
post #15939 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

In general I would not be taking advice from unemployed 30-somethings who are living off their parents long-term about pretty much anything. You work in an environment that requires a suit and care about owning quality things. Nothing wrong with that. I don't see how your profession or place of employment is relevant at all unless you're bankrupting yourself to get nice clothes, which - based on what seems to be a good head on your shoulders (sans the occasional picnic attack) and your plan to slowly build a wardrobe over time - you are not. I agree with others who said your mistake was answering his question in the first place. It's very tacky to ask something like that.

Another thing to consider is that unemployed 30-somethings still living at home have no idea of the value of money.

Nor do they have any right to criticize how an employed, responsible adult spends their money.
post #15940 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by europrep View Post
 

Yet, Americans will tend to frown upon the expensive clothing and accessories while maxing themselves out monetarily to buy large homes with more space than they need.

 

Think it's a gender issue, TBH. I know plenty of American women who spend a lot on clothes, but it's not such an "approved expense" for men. "The Secret Vice," I guess.

post #15941 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by YRR92 View Post

Think it's a gender issue, TBH. I know plenty of American women who spend a lot on clothes, but it's not such an "approved expense" for men. "The Secret Vice," I guess.

Agreed
post #15942 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by EFV View Post

Hmm, in Stockholm I would definitely say the trend is to own rather than rent. OTOH we do exist in Europe's periphery.

 

Yes, it was a very general statement. 

 

Stockholm was one of my favorite cities to visit while I was living over there!  Besides the outrageous cost of alcohol, it has a lot going for it.  

post #15943 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Noodles View Post
 

My point was that he was questioning why I would wear such an expensive suit when I am just an accountant working at a think tank. I guess I can't live in a nice house and drive a nice car since I am just an accountant working at a think tank. 

 

The real insult here is not querying the cost of your suit; it's the phrase "just an accountant".

 

I think that is hugely insulting. No response is required. You just cross that person off your list of people you can be bothered with.

 

I also hate it when people say "just a teacher". Teachers themselves seem so used to this that they often introduce themselves as "just a teacher".

 

It doesn't matter what work you do, as long as you do it to the best of your ability and take pride in what you do.

post #15944 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by europrep View Post

While living across the pond, the biggest difference I found between Americans and Europeans (yes, I am being very general here, but it has been my experience) was the Europeans would spend more on clothing and accessories (quality over quantity) but live in relatively small apartments/houses (relative to American standards).  Renting also seemed to be the norm over owning.  Yet, Americans will tend to frown upon the expensive clothing and accessories while maxing themselves out monetarily to buy large homes with more space than they need.
So true.
I have never met an European in person so I cannot speak of them. (J/K).
But the Americans (whites) spend less money on clothes, and even on cars, and spend tons on their houses and what goes inside it. You see so many white Americans dressed poOrly in an average car living in very nice houses. I actually respect this way of life. What lasts longer? Those who spend majority of their money on clothes and cars while living in a dump seem superficial. I am just making a very general stmt.
post #15945 of 37482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

The real insult here is not querying the cost of your suit; it's the phrase "just an accountant".

I think that is hugely insulting. No response is required. You just cross that person off your list of people you can be bothered with.

I also hate it when people say "just a teacher". Teachers themselves seem so used to this that they often introduce themselves as "just a teacher".

It doesn't matter what work you do, as long as you do it to the best of your ability and take pride in what you do.
Very nicely put.
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