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Lobb double monks

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws....me=WDVW Could I please elicit comments from the usual suspects as to what they think of the fact that these are seconds due to finish, and if the price is about right or not?  Thanks.
post #2 of 12
The seller asks much less than a pair of Lobbs at Hermes. But what's an "about right" price for shoes that won't "polish up" on your feet? In other words, Lobb shoes that don't shine are just shoes that don't shine. My advice is to buy a new pair of Edward Green monks in a store and get fit and quality for a little more money. Hermes makes their ready-mades in Green's former factory.
post #3 of 12
The "don't shine good" excuse is a little odd, don't you think? Also, as for the price, even perfect, brand-new Lobbs never seem to sell for more than $450 or so on EBay, regardless of how much they sell for at regular retail. Thus, I wouldn't say the price is an incredible bargain in the EBay scheme of things.
post #4 of 12
The "shine" defect does sound odd.... I have not bought clothes from Ebay, rather I go for art glass but I noticed that the seller prefers PayPal, but there is no PayPal Buyer Protection, so that is a bit off.  See:  Purchase Protection. Also, for that amount of money, you had better be sure that the shoe fits. I for one would not take such a risk with that amount, regardless of how "good" the deal is, if I have no experience with the shoe.
post #5 of 12
I presume, although I don't know for certain, that the seller gets his supplies from the John Lobb outlet shop in Northampton. I have never been to the shop, but I have heard that price for seconds ranges between GBP 125.00 and GBP 200.00. I personally wouldn't have any hesitation to buy sub-standards but I would like to see and inspect them first.
post #6 of 12
That shoe has JL's "bevelled bootmaker" sole and would retail, if in perfect condition, for over $1000. They're polished to a very high shine, so for them to be seconds because they won't take that shine doesn't exactly mean that they're going to turn out dull. The price seems to be on the high end of reasonable, although I'm with bengal-stripe about wanting to see the goods before buying seconds. Of more concern to me is that the seller doesn't have much feedback and apparently doesn't know the appropriate size conversion. Unlike other English shoes, JL Paris shoes have an American size a full size smaller than the size marked on the shoe. Add to that the fact that this shoe is made on the 7000 last, which runs large. It's a US 12 at least.
post #7 of 12
Those shoes were rejected by John Lobb and returned to the Northampton leather supplier who sold Lobb the calfskin, for the reason stated in the auction - Lobb had a hard time polishing them to their standards. The seller is either the leather supplier, or someone closely associated with them. I have this info on good authority. I have not seen a pair in person, but I'm sure the leather cannot be that bad, a little elbow grease and you would probably reach an above average shine. I would not hesitate to buy a pair if they had them in my size (they don't, I checked ) Of course, I never hesitate becasue if they don't fit I just put them back on ebay and get my money back out...
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Those shoes were rejected by John Lobb and returned to the Northampton leather supplier who sold Lobb the calfskin, for the reason stated in the auction - Lobb had a hard time polishing them to their standards. The seller is either the leather supplier, or someone closely associated with them. I have this info on good authority.
A Harris, my understanding was that these rejects ended up on sale at JL's Northampton factory store. Could you clarify the criteria JL uses to send some rejected shoes back to the leather supplier and others to be sold at the factory store? Also, I noticed a few different stamps on JL shoes. The rejects typically have an "R" (in a circle) stamped on them. I have also seen an "S" stamp on shoes sold in the JL retail stores (not northampton factory store). Any clue what the "S" signifies ?
post #9 of 12
In this case, the defect was due to the leather, not the manufacturing process, so I suppose JL made the leather supplier take the shoes. If they went to the factory store, then JL would be taking the loss. As for the "S" stamp, maybe seconds? I don't really have a clue though. I've never been to the Northampton outlets.
post #10 of 12
Perhaps "sale" item, so that future returns of the shoe aren't given full-price credit. I shouldn't think that Lobb would have seconds/rejects on sale at a normal retail location. Have you ever seen seconds of anything at high-end a retailer?
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Perhaps "sale" item, so that future returns of the shoe aren't given full-price credit.  I shouldn't think that Lobb would have seconds/rejects on sale at a normal retail location.  Have you ever seen seconds of anything at high-end a retailer?
Shoefan, you are probably right about the "S" stamp being for sale items. However, this is probably only in the UK as I have not noticed that practice in the US. I do not recollect seeing rejects/seconds at JL retail/Hermes stores. However, I have seen C&J seconds (they call it "SUBS") at their flagship Jermyn street store, which I thought was unusual, especially since they too have a Northampton factory store...
post #12 of 12
Quote:
I do not recollect seeing rejects/seconds at JL retail/Hermes stores. However, I have seen C&J seconds (they call it "SUBS") at their flagship Jermyn street store, which I thought was unusual, especially since they too have a Northampton factory store...
The C&J seconds at the Jermyn Street store are all Handgrade shoes, which they don't sell at the Northampton factory shop.  (Damn.)
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