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Financial Analysts (Mobilty)

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I have been reading up on Sell/Buy-side financial analysts. Could anyone provide more information from their experiences and comment on the duties,  what kind of institution you work at, and upward mobility.

 

Is a financial analyst something that a person would want to have as a career.

post #2 of 8

When you use the term "Financial Analyst" it typically refers to someone working on the corporate side of the house. So this wouldn't be considered a front office role. This is what they call Corporate Finance.

 

I'm generalizing here, but I have a feeling you are referring to investment banking analysts, equity research analysts, hedge fund analysts, etc, opposed to a true "Financial Analyst".

 

To answer the question you AREN'T asking, a FA might be involved in everything from ad hoc for MD's / VP's, budgeting & forecasting, FP&A (reporting), account reconciliation, etc. You will likely NOT be client facing.

 

First year analyst salary is usually 50-60k, and depending on where you live it could reach ~70k. 10% bonus could be considered aggressive albeit being fairly standard at my firm.

 

As for mobility / hierarchy structure, it's fairly limited and not as lucrative. Analyst for 2-4 years > Senior Analyst > Director of Region / Project / Division > UP or Lateral

 

Know that corporate finance is an alternative to investment banking / hedge funds / consulting, and is much easier to break into. Also note that Corporate Strategy might is referred to as Corporate Finance, however this is a different beast not classified by info above.


Edited by Onetwobit - 12/28/13 at 1:58pm
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

"FA might be involved in everything from ad hoc for MD's / VP's, budgeting & forecasting, FP&A (reporting), account reconciliation, etc."

 

Can I move out as a hedge fund analyst. Maybe, you can provide more insight than the articles I am reading  (they suck).

 

It sounds like a Financial Analyst does more number crunching than a hedge analyst or equity research analyst.

post #4 of 8

I too am finding myself in a bind.  Ive graduated for about 2 years now, and the job market has been so bad that I haven't found a job.  Ive recently joined New York Life, as a Life insurance agent, but damn its not as lucrative as they make it sound.  The benefit (albeit, it is a long few years before Im there) is that there is a method of becoming a Financial advisor, taking series 6-66-63 and series 7 exams.  So im lost between that or going for a masters in business.  Though both may proove to be more difficult than I expect.  Any insight guys, for a person aspiring to create a financially well future?

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

I think you can do your master while you do your life insurance thing. My friend, an undergrad, got his series 7 his Junior year through one of those insurance things.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thearkly 

It sounds like a Financial Analyst does more number crunching than a hedge analyst or equity research analyst.

No, you're generalizing. It depends on position, company, specialty/sector, etc. A "financial analyst" can mean just about anything.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thearkly View Post
 

I think you can do your master while you do your life insurance thing. My friend, an undergrad, got his series 7 his Junior year through one of those insurance things.

 

Yea I think your right.  They claim that there is alot of time in your hands.  Well lets see, I haven't had much luck in this insurance business.  How is your friend doing btw?

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

What do you mean how is he doing?  He is still in school doing the Primerica thing.

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