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Initials on dress shirts

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
As seen on Mr. Jun's site, he carries initials on all his apparel, even on his shoes.. I was wondering if an ordinary tailor will be able to do this. According to my insights i can't be a tough operation.. What shirts makers do you guys know who offers these kind of gimmicks? Does Jantzen for example offers this feature? On the other hand, what do you guys think of carrying your initials on dress-shirts? Is it too decadent? Or are you likely to have other opinions on it? Thanks in advance, Krishan
post #2 of 14
Most shirtmakers (including Jantzen) and tailors will add your initials to items in your order.  While I can generally remember who I am, a reminder provided by the monogram on my clothing has on occasion been helpful   Jesting aside, while arguably affected and unarguably unncessary, there is certainly nothing inherently wrong with adding one's initials to one's garments...provided the monogram isn't obvious when the garment is worn.  I find that the inside of the yoke is an acceptable place for the monogram on a shirt. If you must add monograms to other items in your wardrobe, I would suggest that those, too, be placed so unobvious.
post #3 of 14
I agree about the monogram being placed in a place that can't be seen. Therefore, I only place monograms inside the yoke. What is the benefit of this? Well, with Jantzen the monogram is placed there in lieu of the Jantzen tag. So, what you are left with is a piece of fabric with your embroidered monogram where the tag would otherwise be. Pretty darn cool, if you ask me. Nobody (except styleforum members of some others) would ever know where your shirt came from. I quite like that. It really is the evidence that you are responsible for the shirt design.
post #4 of 14
I've always thought monogramming clothing odd, an affectation by some with more money than refinement.  But after unhappy experiences with laundries, I now see the sense in placing a monogram where it may be seen -- by the workers in those laundries, not by anyone while I'm wearing the clothing (what need has anyone else to know my initials?).  So, I now have my shirtmaker place my initials either inside the yoke or at the bottom of the button placket.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
As seen on Mr. Jun's site, he carries initials on all his apparel, even on his shoes.. I was wondering if an ordinary tailor will be able to do this. According to my insights i can't be a tough operation.. What shirts makers do you guys know who offers these kind of gimmicks? Does Jantzen for example offers this feature? On the other hand, what do you guys think of carrying your initials on dress-shirts? Is it too decadent? Or are you likely to have other opinions on it? Thanks in advance, Krishan
I think it is ridiculious when you see it. You are not a dog.
post #6 of 14
Monograms (your initials embroidered) on your shirts were originally so that you got YOUR shirts back from the laundry. They were also standard on custom-made shirts and the real reason for their popularity and aura. "Monogram" means "to mark with a design composed of one or more letters, typically the initials of a name". The word comes from the Greek "mono", + "gramma"; meaning "one letter". In recent years monograms have been regarded as ostentatious, especially initials on a shirt cuff. If you really want a monogram, the more acceptable are those not easily seen, like on the pocket of a shirt or best -- centered five or six inches up from the waist on the left side between the pocket (or if no pocket, where it would have been) and waist. Andy
post #7 of 14
Quote:
As seen on Mr. Jun's site, he carries initials on all his apparel, even on his shoes.. I was wondering if an ordinary tailor will be able to do this. According to my insights i can't be a tough operation.. What shirts makers do you guys know who offers these kind of gimmicks? Does Jantzen for example offers this feature? On the other hand, what do you guys think of carrying your initials on dress-shirts? Is it too decadent? Or are you likely to have other opinions on it? Thanks in advance, Krishan
As someone once stated on here, I know my own name... koji
post #8 of 14
Reminds me of the great exchange between Bertie Wooster and Jeeves the butler, when Jeeves finds monogrammed handkerchiefs in the wardrobe (from memory): Jeeves: sir, there are peculiar objects in the wardrobe. Wooster: those are handkerchiefs, Jeeves. Jeeves: they appear to have writings on them, sir. Wooster: yes, I bought several dozen and the store offered to have them monogrammed. Jeeves: may I ask, with what purpose in mind, sir? Wooster: I thought they'd look dashed smart. (later) Jeeves: shall I lay out one of your novelty handkerchiefs, sir? Wooster: oh, come off it Jeeves. Everybody monograms their handkerchiefs nowadays. Jeeves: I though practice was restricted to those in danger of forgetting their own names...
post #9 of 14
I think monograms to be useless - maybe the inner yoke would be an acceptable location, if the concern were getting the correct shirt back from the laundry.
post #10 of 14
I guess I'm in the minority (or worse, maybe the only person on this forum), but I like monograms. I'm not sure precisely why I like monograms so much, maybe because nobody else seems to have them. I realize that they have little utility (I can almost always remember my name), so I guess they just look nice to me. I could have the monogram placed in an area where it is not visible (i.e., inside the yoke), but I want everybody to see that my shirt was made for me Seriously, I have my shirts monogrammed on the left cuff, and I don't think many people even notice.
post #11 of 14
Agree. I rather like an unobtrusive monogram on my left cuff. Provided it isn't done in a garish color that screams NOTICE ME I find it to be a rather defining characteristic of a custom shirt [along w/ the fit of course ] V-
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Krishan
As someone once stated on here, I know my own name... koji[/quote] That may be very well but not all people know their name. l know an executive who had a breakdown at work. She cannot remember her hubby or kids. She cannot even remember what she looks like. She forgets completely everything after 10 minutes. She cannot go outside because she doesn't know where she is. When she wakes up, she doesn't know where she is. She even has to draw a map of her house so she doesn't get lost in the house. She can't watch a film because she doesn't know how it started. She can't have a shower because she forgets what parts of her body have been washed. She can wash herself for hours and forget she has even done it. When she wakes up she doesn't know where she is. She has to write notes for everything. Abit like ground hog day. Now monogram shirts and slippers would be ideal for her.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Quote:
(Thracozaag @ 12 July 2004, 08:51) Krishan
As someone once stated on here, I know my own name... koji
That may be very well but not all people know their name. l know an executive who had a breakdown at work. She cannot remember her hubby or kids. She cannot even remember what she looks like. She forgets completely everything after 10 minutes. She cannot go outside because she doesn't know where she is. When she wakes up, she doesn't know where she is. She even has to draw a map of her house so she doesn't get lost in the house. She can't watch a film because she doesn't know how it started. She can't have a shower because she forgets what parts of her body have been washed. She can wash herself for hours and forget she has even done it. When she wakes up she doesn't know where she is. She has to write notes for everything. Abit like ground hog day. Now monogram shirts and slippers would be ideal for her. [/quote] I wonder if Einstein had monogrammed shirts. koji
post #14 of 14
Not to hijack the thread but there was a New Yorker cartoon about designer initials on garments when they began putting them in visible places in the 70's (one reason I'll never own a pair of Mephisto shoes). "If my mother had wanted me to have YSL on my shirts she'd have named me Yves St. Laurent." Will P.S. I prefer my sewn initials in my shirt collars over my laundry's pen marks. Though that only works part of the time.
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