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Where should I get my tuxedo? - Page 4

post #46 of 55
nm
post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

This thread is on crack


as are others. so let the noobs learn. or better yet, take notes.

post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post


as are others. so let the noobs learn. or better yet, take notes.

I think he meant this one is on buttcrack.
post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcodalondra View Post

Yes I read it but I quoted it as neither I or any of you can say whether it has any foundation. What probably cause that statement in that book, is that wherever double vented were originated, italian really adopted them as it was a better solution for rounder back.

Now, you will not find this on the English only based pieces of individual reaserch like the Black Tie Guide, and some people that consider those sources as the only truth will not accept that no vent is not the best way to cut a dinner jacket that will actually be used at function. Again, the Duke of Windsor, during the 20s-50s period when he contributed a lot in establishing the change of dinner cloth from white tie to black tie, had all of his dinner jacket and suits double vented...

What is really true, is that many keep mentioning riding on horses, when riding coat were basically body coat (centrally vented), and later country jackets were still centrally vented.

A shaped jacket with no vent will not deal with a rounded back very well in movements and sitting down and vents help that. Bu many of you, some I am sure have not experience in attending black tie events, will continue just saying that is more traditional to have no vents and even get people to close jacket that were cut to be vented....

If one unbuttons his jacket when seated, as one should with a single breasted jacket, the result, when it comes to wrinkling, is essentially the same as a double vent. This is why, generally, I prefer double vents in my double breasted jackets, as they remain closed at all times. BTG also mentions that double vented jackets are correct, and sufficiently formal. Thisis a simple matter of preference.

Double vents are not a valid solution to a large, or protruding, behind. This simply allows the skirt of the jacket to flare backward, causing the vents to gape in an undightky fashion. They are doubtless more comfortable, but so is a black cardigan; should we substitute this for a dinner jacket? Whether double vented or unvented, the jacket still needs to fit the body. Would you fit extra people in your car by leaving the doors slightly open?

And I have attended several Black Tie functions, both seated dinners and less formal events. If I hang my jacket afterward, the unvented tail returns to its proper shape easily, as do other unvented jackets made of natural materials.
post #50 of 55
I read once that Miley Cyrus invented double vents to accommodate twerking.
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post

If one unbuttons his jacket when seated, as one should with a single breasted jacket, the result, when it comes to wrinkling, is essentially the same as a double vent. This is why, generally, I prefer double vents in my double breasted jackets, as they remain closed at all times. BTG also mentions that double vented jackets are correct, and sufficiently formal. Thisis a simple matter of preference.

Double vents are not a valid solution to a large, or protruding, behind. This simply allows the skirt of the jacket to flare backward, causing the vents to gape in an undightky fashion. They are doubtless more comfortable, but so is a black cardigan; should we substitute this for a dinner jacket? Whether double vented or unvented, the jacket still needs to fit the body. Would you fit extra people in your car by leaving the doors slightly open?

And I have attended several Black Tie functions, both seated dinners and less formal events. If I hang my jacket afterward, the unvented tail returns to its proper shape easily, as do other unvented jackets made of natural materials.

Uuuuuu you went again from suggestion seeker to super expert and veteran black tie eventer in few months, impressive.

Aside of sarcasm, you did not understand my point. The jacket needs to be shaped with or without vents, this was not even in question, and when standing still the vents should therefore look closed. Bespoke jacket for rounder bottom while have the skirt/vents shaped accordingly.

The problem you have is with movement and sitting down when an unvented jacket back will ride up/ wrinkle, whilst the vented version will be able to fall flatter.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcodalondra View Post

Uuuuuu you went again from suggestion seeker to super expert and veteran black tie eventer in few months, impressive.

Aside of sarcasm, you did not understand my point. The jacket needs to be shaped with or without vents, this was not even in question, and when standing still the vents should therefore look closed. Bespoke jacket for rounder bottom while have the skirt/vents shaped accordingly.

The problem you have is with movement and sitting down when an unvented jacket back will ride up/ wrinkle, whilst the vented version will be able to fall flatter.

Actually, if you look back, I asked for few, if any, suggestions for my tuxedo. I knew exactly what I wanted from the beginning, with the exception that my research led me to a Marcella shirt, when I would otherwise have had a plain front. Second, this debate is about jackets, and is not specific to dinner jackets. Do you think no one else on the forum is experienced at sitting down in a jacket? The double vented jacket only falls noticeably straighter on something like a piano bench, where there is a surface to either side, but not at the back. On a stool, it falls on all sides. In a chair, either type will bunch against the chairs back. In a pew, everything gets messed up.

As to movement, I find the advantage of vents minimal when the jacket fits well. If I am moving around a great deal (swing dancing, for example) I need the jacket open anyway, and then the point is moot. And, I am an ice hockey player; I am entirely familiar with the difficulties associated with a round bottom.

Of course, you completely ignored the fact that I agreed with you, from the beginning, that double vents are entirely acceptable. But, please, do dazzle us with your next condescending post.
post #53 of 55
I have been on this forum for seven years...from back in the day when Titans posted their fits. And I will say that the black tie rig ImTheGroom put together is one of the best if not the best I have even seen posted here...all the more-impressive considering what he paid for it. So I would assume a groom on a budget might do well to take advice from him.
post #54 of 55
Ok, let summarise my points

-there is no need to suggest to close up existing vents on the OP shortlist. Double vents are equally acceptable and classic, and in today world a better choice for the use needed. Flaps can be dealt with by tucking them in, in most case.

-the story about double vent being derived from riding coats does not seam to be true IMO, there are many theories for its origin, and I reported a story that firs withs what you see in Italy on particular body types. A well shaped jacket with vents fall better in movements and sitting down, on any seats type, as you will not have to sit on it or let the jacket bunch up to accommodate the skirt!
post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by loarbmhs View Post

Here's my two cents re your tuxedo:

1. No vent -- It's the classic way to go.

2. Grosgrain -- Don't be afraid of it not being satin. Quite the contrary--celebrate it! The best Savile Row houses have a distinct preference for grosgrain--more understated than satin and looks less like rented tux.

3. Patent shoes -- You're 95% of the way there with the tux. Don't stop at the end. Get yourself a pair of classic, round toe, lace up patent shoes. You'll have them for the rest of your life, and will feel (quietly) self-assured when you look at everyone else's shoes where they're trying to pawn off work clothes for black tie.

The whole point is that everything is special and different about black tie--the tux, shirt, tie, cummerbund/vest, socks, shoes and cuff links/studs. Go all the way, my friend, and congratulations on the upcoming nuptials!

1. I don't agree. A double vent is one thing I think you should "break the rules" on. I think it sits better and is more comfortable. Also, you can always sew them shut, but you can't go the other way (from ventless to vented).

2. I don't think Grosgrain is that common and might be hard to find.

3. I personally find patent shoes to look cheesy. Highly polished plain toe calf may be a better alternative if you don't like patent.
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