or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › Current Events, Power and Money › Daily CE Musings of Piob
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Daily CE Musings of Piob - Page 335

post #5011 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37454533

Made me chuckle. They forgot to mention Hey Man.

Me or original recipe? :P
post #5012 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post


I love that the Op Ed he published yesterday had the headline "Take a Deep Breath". smile.gif

 

I don't know who the bigger putz is: him or his handlers.

post #5013 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I don't know who the bigger putz is: him or his handlers.
Have you ever looked at your handlers, man? I mean, like, really looked at your handlers?
post #5014 of 5110
Thread Starter 
So Obama's veto was met with an overwhelming override? And Bernie and Tim Kaine did not vote?

Well, I think Obama was correct in the veto. I think the Dems showed what total fucking vote whores they are and that they'll put their political aspirations over the good of the country. They also showed that once your expiration date has been reached they do not have your back.
post #5015 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

So Obama's veto was met with an overwhelming override? And Bernie and Tim Kaine did not vote?

Well, I think Obama was correct in the veto. I think the Dems showed what total fucking vote whores they are and that they'll put their political aspirations over the good of the country. They also showed that once your expiration date has been reached they do not have your back.
Do you mean Obama's back? Pretty sure he's fine with it. It's kind of a sui generis issue, and one where his role is to play Henry V rather than Prince Hal. I agree with you on the substantive issue. I'm pretty sure lots of Democratic and Republican Senators do as well. It's just a Kabuki theater moment where everyone knows their own role and those of the other participants.
post #5016 of 5110
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

Do you mean Obama's back? Pretty sure he's fine with it. It's kind of a sui generis issue, and one where his role is to play Henry V rather than Prince Hal. I agree with you on the substantive issue. I'm pretty sure lots of Democratic and Republican Senators do as well. It's just a Kabuki theater moment where everyone knows their own role and those of the other participants.

It almost sounds like you're okay with this?
post #5017 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

It almost sounds like you're okay with this?
More like no more disgusted than I am by everyday politics, and perhaps even a tad less because of the unique nature of the "issue". My main point was that, given the nature of the issue and the obvious politics/public perception, I strongly doubt Obama feels betrayed or as though people left his back exposed.
post #5018 of 5110
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

More like no more disgusted than I am by everyday politics, and perhaps even a tad less because of the unique nature of the "issue". My main point was that, given the nature of the issue and the obvious politics/public perception, I strongly doubt Obama feels betrayed or as though people left his back exposed.

I had a lapse in my cynicism; my bad.
post #5019 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

So Obama's veto was met with an overwhelming override? And Bernie and Tim Kaine did not vote?

Well, I think Obama was correct in the veto. I think the Dems showed what total fucking vote whores they are and that they'll put their political aspirations over the good of the country. They also showed that once your expiration date has been reached they do not have your back.


Chuck Schumer was supporting the bill, and said something like "unless we pass this and make it general (don't restrict it just to 9/11 victims), countries won't have an incentive not to do this again."


I mean, FFS. If we have to use the threat of legal action as the only disincentive to keep countries from perpetuating terrorism against us, we've done something deeply wrong. We can go fuck their shit up, Chuck, we don't need to rely on suing.
post #5020 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post


Chuck Schumer was supporting the bill, and said something like "unless we pass this and make it general (don't restrict it just to 9/11 victims), countries won't have an incentive not to do this again."


I mean, FFS. If we have to use the threat of legal action as the only disincentive to keep countries from perpetuating terrorism against us, we've done something deeply wrong. We can go fuck their shit up, Chuck, we don't need to rely on suing.

 

Oh Chuck Schumer, always around for a laugh...

post #5021 of 5110
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

Chuck Schumer was supporting the bill, and said something like "unless we pass this and make it general (don't restrict it just to 9/11 victims), countries won't have an incentive not to do this again."


I mean, FFS. If we have to use the threat of legal action as the only disincentive to keep countries from perpetuating terrorism against us, we've done something deeply wrong. We can go fuck their shit up, Chuck, we don't need to rely on suing.

post #5022 of 5110

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Corker (R-Tn.), Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Dianne Feinstein (D-Ca.), Lamar Alexander (R-Tn.), Mark Warner (D-Va.), Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), Jack Reed (D-R.I.), Pat Roberts (R-Ks.), Chris Coons (D-De.), Jeff Flake (R-Az.), Tom Udall (D-N.M.), Dan Coats (R-In.), Bill Nelson (D-Fl.), John Thune (R-S.D.), Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), Angus King (I-Me.), Tom Carper (D-De.), Tom Cotton (R-Ar.), Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), Dan Sullivan (R-Al.), Jeff Merkley (D-Or.), Jim Risch (R-Id.), Brian Schatz (D-Hi.), John McCain (R-Az.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), Mazie Hirono (D-Hi.), and Michael Bennet (D-Co.)View Post


Dear Senators Cornyn and Schumer:
 
We are writing regarding the anticipated override of the president’s veto of S. 2040, the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA). 
 
We appreciate the efforts that you have undertaken to allow the families who lost loved ones on September 11, 2001 to have additional recourse. 
 
We have a great deal of compassion for the families and respect their desire for justice.  We understand your purpose in drafting this legislation is to remove obstacles so those who commit or support terrorist acts in the United States face the full range of consequences of the U.S. legal system.  However, concerns have been raised regarding potential unintended consequences that may result from this legislation for the national security and foreign policy of the United States.  If other nations respond to this bill by weakening U.S. sovereign immunity protections, then the United States could face private lawsuits in foreign courts as a result of important military or intelligence activities.
 
We would hope to work with you in a constructive manner to appropriately mitigate those unintended consequences.

 

So wait - they make a big deal of overriding the veto of a very bad bill, a bill that Obama stated could have unintended consequences and then after it passes into law you realize it was a bad bill that could have "unintended ramifications"?  And then you somehow put the blame on Obama?

 

You couldn't make this shit up  laugh3-smiley.gif?1292867631laugh3-smiley.gif?1292867631laugh3-smiley.gif?1292867631 

 

 

McConnell: Saudi 9/11 law could have 'unintended ramifications'

 

Quote:
  Politico Article Text (Click to show)
The Republican Senate leader blames the White House for not engaging sooner with Congress.
By SEUNG MIN KIM and BURGESS EVERETT 09/29/16 12:47 PM EDT Updated 09/29/16 04:30 PM EDT
 
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Thursday that a new law allowing U.S. victims of terrorism to sue foreign governments may have “unintended ramifications,” despite Congress’s overwhelming vote this week to defy President Barack Obama’s veto of the legislation.
 
Though Obama’s veto of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act was easily overridden, many senators are seeking changes to the law later this year, particularly after gauging any international reaction. McConnell laid some fault at the hands of the White House, calling the battle over JASTA a “good example” of “failure to communicate early about the potential consequences” of a popular bill.
 
“I told the president the other day that this is an example of an issue that we should have talked about much earlier,” McConnell said Thursday. “It appears as if there may be some unintended ramifications of that and I do think it’s worth further discussing. But it was certainly not something that was going to be fixed this week.”
 
A spokesman said McConnell and Obama spoke on Monday, the same day the majority leader teed up a vote on the veto override. The vote in the Senate to reject Obama’s veto was 97-1, and 348-77 in the House.
 
Later Thursday, Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) also said the law could be revisited. "I would like to think there may be some work to be done to protect our service members overseas from any kind of legal ensnarement that occur, any kind of retribution," Ryan said at his weekly press conference Thursday. "I would like to think there’s a way we can fix so that our service members do not have legal problems overseas while still protecting the rights of the 9/11 victims, which is what JASTA did do."
 
The White House lashed out at Congress for the veto override. Administration officials pointed out that some senators shared their concerns that the measure could backfire on the United States abroad, yet they still supported it. Nearly 30 senators have signed a letter asking the bill’s leading sponsors to address any unintended consequences of JASTA after it goes into effect.
 
“It’s hard to take at face value the suggestion that they were unaware of the consequences of their vote, but even if they were, what’s true in elementary school is true in the United States Congress: ignorance is not an excuse, particularly when it comes to our national security and the safety and security of our diplomats and our servicemembers," White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters on Thursday.
 
Obama also called the override a “political vote” and a “mistake.”
 
“It’s a dangerous precedent, and it’s an example of why sometimes you have to do what’s hard. And, frankly, I wish Congress here had done what’s hard,” Obama said at a CNN town hall. “If you’re perceived as voting against 9/11 families right before an election, not surprisingly, that’s a hard vote for people to take. But it would have been the right thing to do.”
 
Still, McConnell’s comments echoed complaints from Republicans and Democrats who said the White House did little to engage members of Congress with their concerns.
 
“Everybody was aware of who the potential beneficiaries were but no one had really focused on the potential downside in terms of our international relationships. And I think it was just a ball dropped,” McConnell said. “I hate to blame everything on him and I don’t, [but] it would have been helpful if we had a discussion about this much earlier than the last week.”
 
New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, the lead Democrat on the legislation, said on Thursday that he is willing to look at changes, but “not any that hurt the families.” He worked closely with families of 9/11 victims to craft the measure.
 
He also responded to the White House’s criticisms, saying: “It’s hardly political for me.”
“I’ve sat and worked with these families for five years. I feel their pain. Not close to the amount because I didn’t lose a loved one the way they did,” Schumer said. “But this is about justice. And I would say in a very partisan time, for any president — and this one in particular — to have only one veto override, that’s a darn good record.”
 
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), the only member of the Senate who voted to sustain Obama’s veto, declined to comment about his vote. He also spoke privately with Obama earlier this week.
 

 


Edited by Rumpelstiltskin - 9/30/16 at 2:24am
post #5023 of 5110
Every time I see Rumplestiltskin Sir Mix A Lot goes "Ooh rump of smooth skin" in my head
post #5024 of 5110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

So Obama's veto was met with an overwhelming override? And Bernie and Tim Kaine did not vote?

Well, I think Obama was correct in the veto. I think the Dems showed what total fucking vote whores they are and that they'll put their political aspirations over the good of the country. They also showed that once your expiration date has been reached they do not have your back.

But the Republicans control Senate and Congress with the largest majority since 1930 something. And the blame for political aspirations and vote whoring is solely on the Democrats?

It's a dumb bill. Everybody is using it for political points
post #5025 of 5110
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpelstiltskin View Post

So wait - they make a big deal of overriding the veto of a very bad bill, a bill that Obama stated could have unintended consequences and then after it passes into law you realize it was a bad bill that could have "unintended ramifications"?  And then you somehow put the blame on Obama?

Well, it's not like a certain "signature legislation" regarding health care didn't have a crap ton of them...
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

But the Republicans control Senate and Congress with the largest majority since 1930 something. And the blame for political aspirations and vote whoring is solely on the Democrats?

It's a dumb bill. Everybody is using it for political points

It's next level when you're doing it to your own Party's POTUS.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Current Events, Power and Money
Styleforum › Forums › General › Current Events, Power and Money › Daily CE Musings of Piob