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Daily CE Musings of Piob - Page 158

post #2356 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Check your privilege there, LD. Jehovah Witnesses =! Mormon! Fucking bigot.

I must say, I've never been confused w/ a JW.
post #2357 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

I must say, I've never been confused w/ a JW.


You, more than most, should know to read the fine print. smile.gif
post #2358 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

You, more than most, should know to read the fine print. smile.gif

Oh no, I read it. Just commenting generally.
post #2359 of 5118
Quote:
DETROIT (WWJ) – There are loans for a car, a house and now — in Detroit — those lacking in locks can apply for a loan to buy some hair.
The “Weave Loan Store” on W. 8 Mile Road in Detroit will be open for business June 13.
Detroit native salon co-owner Fred — who prefers not to use his last name — and his wife came up with the idea to offer a line of credit to buy weaves after he says many of his clients wanted hair extensions but couldn’t afford them.
“So, it was born out of a need to give our customers options as it relates to their hair extension purchase,” Fred told WWJ Newsradio 950’s Stephanie Davis.
How will it work?
“Much like a credit card, where you have a line of credit,” Fred explained. “With your line of credit you’d actually be able to purchase the hair extensions in store. Or, with some of our customers with qualifying credit, they’d actually receive monies to be able shop for their desired hair extensions wherever they like.”
The going price for a weave these days, he said, ranges from $95 to $300 or more — depending on the type of hair.


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post #2360 of 5118
I feel like "needs money for a weave" would be a good reason to be rejected automatically for a loan.
post #2361 of 5118
Thread Starter 
If this guy can get EBT to allow it he's a fucking genius.
post #2362 of 5118
If you can't get approved for a credit card, and you don't have cash on hand to make a $95 purchase, you should probably evaluate whether you really need that.

I wonder what kind of percentage he has to give to the bank who is underwriting this. Based on my limited knowledge, when a place, such as a furniture store, offers their 0% financing sales, they give ~5% of the purchase price to the bank because a certain number of people are going to default and some will pay it off without paying any interest. I feel like the risk of default on something like this is just a bit higher.
post #2363 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

Piob I forgot what thread it was where we had a conversation about airport security , but I just wanted to let you know it happened again. As I walked up to the line, a TSA agent said I was "randomly" selected for the alternate screening which means no show removal, no X-ray Imaging, no laptop out of bag, just a metal detector and that's it.

Also, I just approached a cop to ask about street parking and he smiled at me and said it's free, and he did not shoot me as I walked away despite my darker complexion and bearded appearance.

I'm vaguely thinking of flying into Detroit Metro next year to head over to Windsor. I imagine the trip through their security to get back home will be hell for a blonde haired, blue eyed devil like myself. Maybe I should get Sharon McPhail to escort me through with her gun?

Just happened again, this time for an Intl flight. Randomly selected for TSA pre check no shoes off etc...something's amiss here patch[1].gif
post #2364 of 5118
We did it! Minnesota is so much better and caring than other states:
Quote:
Insurers say they collectively lost more than $300 million on policies for individuals who buy coverage on their own last year because subscribers had more costly health problems than expected.

Higher rates on that coverage would help close the gap, though the size of the increases will attract attention amid scrutiny of the effects of the Affordable Care Act. If regulators were to approve the full amounts, average premiums would increase by more than 50 percent for about 179,000 people, and by more than 10 percent for another 60,000.

But the individual market, which includes the state’s MNsure exchange, grew by about 53 percent last year to about 292,138 people, according to the Minnesota Council of Health Plans. Low rates that some people initially found on MNsure have already started to go away.

...
In the wake of last week’s filings, insurers noted that financial safety nets built into the health law will offer less help to health plans in 2016, before going away completely the following year. The programs for reinsurance, risk-adjustment and what’s called “risk-corridors” could let Minnesota insurers recover more than $150 million in losses from 2014, but there’s uncertainty about how much money actually will be delivered.

http://www.startribune.com/big-premium-increase-requests-show-volatility-in-health-care-market/306436431/

By my math, we added ~100k people to the exchanges last year. Now almost twice as many people added will pay a 50% increase to subsidize those added. Plus, the taxpayers get to cover $150M of the losses by the insurance companies.
post #2365 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

We did it! Minnesota is so much better and caring than other states:
By my math, we added ~100k people to the exchanges last year. Now almost twice as many people added will pay a 50% increase to subsidize those added. Plus, the taxpayers get to cover $150M of the losses by the insurance companies.
not saying single payer plan is better but honestly the chimera you have There seems worse than either system.
post #2366 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarphe View Post

not saying single payer plan is better but honestly the chimera you have There seems worse than either system.

If you actually sat down and tried to build the least efficient health care system possible, it would be hard to beat what we have in the US (before and after Obamacare). It's startlingly stupid, on so many levels. Obamacare made it less painful for many individuals, but no less dumb and certainly not any more efficient.

Amazing that it all basically backtracks to WWII era salary restrictions. Employers couldn't go past certain salary limits, so they started offering benefits. Benefits didn't get taxed, and so the whole system grew up organically from there until it turned into this bloated monstrosity we have now. And to be fair, much of it is in how Americans use (overuse) healthcare.

But too many people are politically and financially invested in it for it to change any time soon, especially since the Democrats are going to be totally gunshy about going near health care again any time this generation. If the Republicans do anything, most likely it'll just be a repeal of Obamacare and we'll just go back to the slightly differently totally fucked system of six years ago.
post #2367 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

If you actually sat down and tried to build the least efficient health care system possible, it would be hard to beat what we have in the US (before and after Obamacare). It's startlingly stupid, on so many levels. Obamacare made it less painful for many individuals, but no less dumb and certainly not any more efficient.

Amazing that it all basically backtracks to WWII era salary restrictions. Employers couldn't go past certain salary limits, so they started offering benefits. Benefits didn't get taxed, and so the whole system grew up organically from there until it turned into this bloated monstrosity we have now. And to be fair, much of it is in how Americans use (overuse) healthcare.

But too many people are politically and financially invested in it for it to change any time soon, especially since the Democrats are going to be totally gunshy about going near health care again any time this generation. If the Republicans do anything, most likely it'll just be a repeal of Obamacare and we'll just go back to the slightly differently totally fucked system of six years ago.

Don't you think Americans overuse healthcare because it is easy to get compared to other countries? I mean, we don't have to wait in line for a week or more to see a doctor like people in Canada or the UK. They also don't bear the costs directly: insurance covers most of the cost, and if you hit the maximum out of pocket, which might be as little as $2k, you can just keep consuming for free. This creates a huge price insensitivity.
post #2368 of 5118
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarphe View Post

not saying single payer plan is better but honestly the chimera you have There seems worse than either system.

The choice is not limited to single payer or the US system. Larger countries that are rated tops by OECD data and WHO reports tend to not be single payer. Germany, France, Japan, to name three large economies, do not have single payer but have universal coverage and always come in tops for quality and satisfaction measures.
post #2369 of 5118
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

Don't you think Americans overuse healthcare because it is easy to get compared to other countries? I mean, we don't have to wait in line for a week or more to see a doctor like people in Canada or the UK. They also don't bear the costs directly: insurance covers most of the cost, and if you hit the maximum out of pocket, which might be as little as $2k, you can just keep consuming for free. This creates a huge price insensitivity.

I think it's a lot of things, and that's certainly part of it. We're a consumerist and individualistic country that worships technology. So consuming large amounts of healthcare, assuming healthcare can fix everything, and not caring if it drives other people's costs up makes some sense. Then we get the incentive structure where individual care has low direct costs and we're shielded from the costs of our insurance. Also the healthcare industry itself has little incentive to reign in the number of procedures done, since they make money off it.


At some point in the relatively recent past, insurers make a decision to stop fighting consumers on approving procedures. They were tired of being the bad guy, so they just decided to constantly raise prices to make up for the increased costs. And, not surprisingly, the costs have just skyrocketed since then. Everybody in the public wants to control costs, but nobody wants their own healthcare limited.
post #2370 of 5118
You keep hearing that Americans don't benefit from the higher prices we pay for health care, but it isn't true. The US is unmatched in measures like availability, timeliness, and quality of care. Cancer survival rates are the best in the world, and the US even has the highest life expectancy in the world if you remove deaths resulting from injuries from consideration. The US healthcare market also subsidizes the development of new drugs and treatments for the entire world.

I guess it's a separate issue as to whether we get our money's worth.
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