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The state of white tie - Page 5

post #61 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by steven1298 View Post
 


The


The worst thing was his videos on the shirt. And did you see his outfit! Dress pants with a tux jacket and an unbuttoned dress shirt!

 

He works in a combined bridal and tuxedo rental store. That should tell you all you need to know about his familiarity with the conventions of formal evening dress.

post #62 of 71

I wholly agree.

 

Additionally, there should be far more of the (single) shirt cuffs peeking out at the sleeve ends. My tailor says 3/4", apparently.

post #63 of 71

 

Gary Cooper, Ray Milland, Robert Preston, G. P. Huntley Jr., and Frank Dawson the butler in white tie. 

post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ballmouse View Post
 

 

Gary Cooper, Ray Milland, Robert Preston, G. P. Huntley Jr., and Frank Dawson the butler in white tie. 

Interesting to note the different waistcoat styles, and choice of pocket square arrangement.

 

I'm a new poster to the Forum , but a sometime avid reader, and note with interest the several posts over time, asking how to personalise full evening dress. As shown here, perhaps choice of marcella waistcoat design and pocket square arrangement are two of the only truly correct ways of personalising what is , otherwise designed to be a uniform.

 

Would be interested in your thoughts.

post #65 of 71

 

If you look closely, I believe the Nicholas Brothers have shawl lapel tailcoats, although it is very hard to tell.

 

But the white tie attire they have is pretty similar (outside the differences between 30s and 40s fashion) - trousers, waistcoats, and jackets all meet at or above the natural waist, black oxfords, wing collar, white tie, and white pocket square.

post #66 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ballmouse View Post


Gad. Damn!!!
post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veremund View Post


Gad. Damn!!!

 

Yeah, Stormy Weather has probably the best end sequence of any of the great Hollywood musicals but it's so much less well known than Singin' in the Rain etc. which I am sure has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that the fact that the cast were black... 

post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbowtie View Post

There are also Viennese balls that take place in parts of the U.S. that call for white tie. Though it only makes sense to go if you like dancing the waltz. Most of these are open to the public, and there are a few that are not on the list.

http://www.vienneseball.org/calendar.php

To tell you the truth the dance floor at the NYC event is too packed to dance the Viennese waltz.

They do have performers and debutantes though. It is a nice party.



post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

To tell you the truth the dance floor at the NYC event is too packed to dance the Viennese waltz.

They do have performers and debutantes though. It is a nice party.




I've been to a number of Viennese balls and I have to say that crowded dance floors tend to be the rule rather than the exception. When I was in Vienna I discovered that crowded dance floors are great training grounds for survival at a ball in Vienna. I've often said that the dance steps, while not easy, are still not as challenging as navigating the dance floor if you're a man. So, the moral of the story is: keep on dancing and hopefully one day it will all be second nature.
Edited by blackbowtie - 9/26/14 at 2:48pm
post #70 of 71
In NYC or elsewhere? Is there a good dance floor at the ones you go to? All too often there are couples on the floor who cannot dance blocking the line-of-dance. Good way of practicing floor craft trying to dance around them but not exactly fun.
post #71 of 71
Mainly in DC. At some of the balls, the floor is not too crowded, but based on my (relatively limited) experience and I've also been told by many veterans that a crowded dance floor is part of the "authentic" experience, whatever that may mean. If my experience at the Techniker-Cercle ball is any indication, this is definitely true in Vienna. The same goes for unskilled dancers blocking the way: you find those even in Vienna.

Personally, it was only after a couple of years of dancing that I became truly comfortable on a crowded dance floor. The balls have been much more fun after that. Having a competent dance partner also helps.

All this would have been much easier if you had been doing this since you were a teenager. But for us late bloomers, the only thing to do is to keep practising, and it will all fall in place eventually. This is also true with wearing white tie: the first time, I felt a bit constricted wearing tails - those stiff detachable collars and all those other contraptions take some getting used to - but after five or six times wearing it I can now say that I'm completely at ease with it, and don't think twice about dancing for hours in it.
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