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Another tux/Dinner jacket thread

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

even though i already read all the Tux/DJ threads, I still got some open questions. I would appreciate if someone could give me some responsie :)

 

I am going to a weeding next spring. Ceremony starts at 4:00pm. For this reason I want to buy a DJ - my first one. It will be bespoke, so I got much opportunities, but also alot of decisions to be made. Here are some thoughts:

 

I thinking about getting a midnight blue, shawl collar with side vents. I am not sure about the colour. In my opinion it should be a bit darker than this:

 

                                          :

 

Do I wear black trousers or the same colour as the jacket? What material is normally used for the lapel? I am not so much in this shiny-material. 

 

Thank you,

palim

 

English is not my native langugae, so I apologise for every spelling and grammar mistake.

post #2 of 12
Trousers should match jacket. Grosgrain lapels are subtler and classier than satin imo. Color should be dark as possible. Ventless is preferred. And in case the pic gives you any ideas, skip the wing collar shirt.
post #3 of 12
^^ Welcome to SF. You are correct that the jacket should be a good bit darker than the one on that model. Midnight blue should be pretty darn close to black and definitely darker than navy. If it's not a true midnight blue, you are better off with a black tuxedo. Trousers should always be the same color as the jacket. Grosgrain is a more subtle option than satin, though both are acceptable.

Shawl lapel tuxedos require a spread collar shirt (not a wing collar which can only be worn with peak lapels or better yet, white tie). Ventless is technically more correct than side vents. If you truly want side vents even though they're technically sub-optimal, get them since a competent tailor should be able to sew the vents shut later.
post #4 of 12
Small side vents are OK, but vent-less is preferred.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

Shawl lapel tuxedos require a spread collar shirt (not a wing collar which can only be worn with peak lapels or better yet, white tie). Ventless is technically more correct than side vents. If you truly want side vents even though they're technically sub-optimal, get them since a competent tailor should be able to sew the vents shut later.

Maybe this image wasn't a good example^^. I plan to buy a white spread collar shirt with cuffs and concealed button panel (hope that is the right english expression), a self-tied modern butterfly bow (black), a cummberbund (black) and black (captoe) oxfords. 

 

As I am not so experienced I am most scared of choosing the right material. I hope my tailor helps me out with it, but it is never bad to be well-informed :)

 

I normally only wear side vents on my suits. How is the comfort with no vents? Especially if you sit down, it might feel strange? 

post #6 of 12
^^ Not sure what you mean by concealed button panel but a spread collar tuxedo shirt should have room to insert 3 metal studs (4 is more common now and fine if you must but 3 is more traditional and will work if your tuxedo fits properly (don't have a too high buttoning point for your jacket and if you have trousers that rise to your natural waist on anything, the tuxedo is the place to do it). Other details sound good.

I've never found the ventless jacket to be that uncomfortable and also have all of my suits with double vents. If anything, I find the tailor can nip the jacket a wisp more at the waist if there is no worry about the vents flaring out.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

^^ Not sure what you mean by concealed button panel but a spread collar tuxedo shirt should have room to insert 3 metal studs (4 is more common now and fine if you must but 3 is more traditional and will work if your tuxedo fits properly (don't have a too high buttoning point for your jacket and if you have trousers that rise to your natural waist on anything, the tuxedo is the place to do it)...

Archibald, I'm pretty sure he means a fly-front shirt, on which the placket is covered by material eliminating the need for studs, as they would be hidden anyway.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nine Miler View Post

Archibald, I'm pretty sure he means a fly-front shirt, on which the placket is covered by material eliminating the need for studs, as they would be hidden anyway.

Figured he might mean that. Really don't like that look.
post #9 of 12
I don't care for it either, but I guess if you are going to do it, the context (shawl collar, cummerbund) make it more palatable. I think the best application for this is with a DB coat where there is less shirt showing, but I am not sure there is a truly "good" application for a fly front. This is my opinion, of course.
post #10 of 12
^ Agree that the above context (shawl collar tuxedo plus cummerbund) is the best way to do it if it's going to be done at all.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nine Miler View Post


Archibald, I'm pretty sure he means a fly-front shirt, on which the placket is covered by material eliminating the need for studs, as they would be hidden anyway.

I meant that. Found the transaltion on the internet, but fly-front shirt is the word i searched for :D I thought it is more "clean" than black studs. Well, i wil think about it.

 

Some random question - why do you insert "^" in front of your posts? 

post #12 of 12
^ References the above post when I don't feel like quoting.
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