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Furniture Projects - Refurbishing, Refinishing, Retasking, and Building

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I did a search, and didn't find another thread like this. I've been slowly getting into the world of refurbishing furniture for my own use. Aside from some stripping/refinishing projects, I also turned an old deck chair into a TV stand for my wife, back when we were dating and living apart. I just searched for my in-project photos of them, but couldn't find them. :s I have some thoughts I have been rolling around in my head for some stuff to build from scratch, as well, which will be a totally new adventure. I can't be the only one who does this. I'd love to see everyone else's projects!

post #2 of 23
Some of my stuff is in the cool furniture thread. I build from scratch.

Not sure if I ever posted this one, I built the humidor and the desk under it.

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post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

Are the edges painted/stained, on the humidor, or is that just an effect of the light?  Looks like it's made of walnut or cherry?

post #4 of 23
The edges are gaboon ebony, the panels are Macassar ebony and the finish is lacquer, hand buffed.
post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 

So, build a frame from the edge pieces, and rout them so you can inset the side panels, then sand the edges round?

post #6 of 23
Not really. the box is made of solid wood panels joined together to form the rough shape. A groove is routed into the top and bottom for plywood panels which are inserted in and glued. They stand proud 1/4 of the sides. Veneer is applied to all outside panels. Grooves are cut into all outside edges and then the outside wooden edges are fitted and glued in. The edges are cut flush to the veneer, the veneer is sanded then a round over is cut into the edges with a router. It is then finish sanded to 320 grit.

The box is cut into two on a table saw, hinges are fitted and a relief is cut into the back so that it can open with flush hinges. It is then finished with lacquer and buffed (50-75 coats believe it or not). The liner and humidification device is fitted into the box aand finally leather is applied to the bottom.
post #7 of 23
Found a couple pictures of the process. I rarely catalog the steps of anything I build, so the pictures are not step by step.

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post #8 of 23
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I decided not to use the mechanical gauge as part of a permanent installation.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

What's the advantage to using ply, rather than solid?  Cost, strength, both?  Easier to work with?

post #10 of 23
Expansion and contraction happens across the grain in wood. So I use Baltic birch (hardwood furniture grade) plywood in many scenarios where I want an exact fit that would otherwise be impossible with solid wood.

MDF is a another consideration, but in this case the internal humidity that the box will be subject to would be detrimental to a sheet of mdf.
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Can anyone point me to a primer on pros and cons of different materials?
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

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I decided not to use the mechanical gauge as part of a permanent installation.

Fantastic. How many weeks it took to polish them? Do you apply with the a spray-gun or by hand? If by hand do you use sponge or brush? Do you sand in between and what type of lacquer do you use? I am asking because I restore antiques on occasion and always looking for know how from experts.

Was this order or do you smoke so much?smile.gif
post #13 of 23
A friend of mine did the lacquering on these, since I don't have the equipment for it. It's about 50 coats of nitrocellulose lacquer applied by spray gun. He polished it after all of the grain was closed and down to something like 10,000 or 20,000 grit.

There are actually six total, Two became humidors (for me), one is a valet box, the rosewood one is my wife's jewellery box and the last two are a valet box that was an order and last one will be a gift for Mother's Day this year.
post #14 of 23
I did not know such small grit exists 10,000? Anyway these are gorgeous and took a lot of time and effort to make them look the way they are.

P.S. For my 2 cents I highly rec. Cigar Oasis for humidification (had mine for a few years now, bulletproof product) and a few online merchants for Cuban cigars.smile.gif
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

I did not know such small grit exists 10,000? Anyway these are gorgeous and took a lot of time and effort to make them look the way they are.

P.S. For my 2 cents I highly rec. Cigar Oasis for humidification (had mine for a few years now, bulletproof product) and a few online merchants for Cuban cigars.smile.gif

 

Neither did I!  I'm planning to tackle some bedroom furniture next, and that's the kind of high gloss finish I want.  I'm going to do a lot of research on this before getting started; my goal is to make something we will have for 30+ years, if all goes well.  I've found an excellent, inexpensive supplier for raw wood, and he will rip, plane, and join it for a reasonable labour charge.

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