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The Film thread - Page 40

post #586 of 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by hennree View Post

I haven't seen The Danish Girl or Steve Jobs yet, but planning on watching them over the next couple of days.

I saw both films. Steve Jobs was really boring and I fell asleep throughout the film. Too much dialogue and Fassbender with his Irish accent in some scenes wasn't convincing as Steve Jobs. He should have won an Oscar for Shame but I think the academy voters felt uncomfortable with the frontal nudity. I was really caught off guard seeing that thing in the theaters having no prior knowledge of it before seeing the film. I had instant fanboy reaction that lasted for a month after seeing it in that film. In the Danish girl, Redmayne also has a frontal, but it doesn't really count cause he tucked it in as the scene calls for his character to begin embracing his femininity
post #587 of 658
BAFTA and Oscar nominated Jordanian film following a young Bedouin boy during WWI. I just watched this on a flight. Apparently the director worked with the Bedouins for a year on this. Enjoyable but a bit predictable (Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, perhaps ?), but I guess that's expected as we're thrown into the fray from a child's point of view.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/01/jordanian-film-nominated-oscar-160114172549144.html
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/aug/13/theeb-review-bedouin-boy-in-the-fog-of-war
post #588 of 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

The Revenant was goddamn underwhelming and contrived. Feels like it kinda blew its wad in the first half hour with the intro and the bear sequence (crazy) and then it's platauing up to the end, for two hours... Shame because the cinematography is often freaking breathtaking and I gotta say it does an awesome job at making the freezing conditions almost palpable to the audience. Would've liked a pure contemplative survival or a balls to the wall revenge flick but this weirdly balanced mix of the two falls short of both.

I guess the ending was supposed to be poetic, but there was something I didn't quite understand:

Never mind, I saw it again and it made sense.
Edited by GoldenTribe - 1/19/16 at 12:01am
post #589 of 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

BAFTA and Oscar nominated Jordanian film following a young Bedouin boy during WWI. I just watched this on a flight. Apparently the director worked with the Bedouins for a year on this. Enjoyable but a bit predictable (Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, perhaps ?), but I guess that's expected as we're thrown into the fray from a child's point of view.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/01/jordanian-film-nominated-oscar-160114172549144.html
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/aug/13/theeb-review-bedouin-boy-in-the-fog-of-war

 

it's showing here (MFA in Houston) tonight, looking forward to seeing this

post #590 of 658
Carol was good. Should've been nominated for best picture over the fucking matt damon.
post #591 of 658
I'm really digging Todd Haynes style. If you liked Carol, go watch HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce
post #592 of 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

The Revenant was goddamn underwhelming and contrived. Feels like it kinda blew its wad in the first half hour with the intro and the bear sequence (crazy) and then it's platauing up to the end, for two hours... Shame because the cinematography is often freaking breathtaking and I gotta say it does an awesome job at making the freezing conditions almost palpable to the audience. Would've liked a pure contemplative survival or a balls to the wall revenge flick but this weirdly balanced mix of the two falls short of both.

And corny flash back/dream sequences should be categorically forbidden, it's lazy and it never works.

can probably be said about a gabazilion movies, but I wonder what folks who went through it think of this

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/17/revenant-leonardo-dicaprio-violent-meaningless-glorification-pain

i haven't seen it nor do i feel compelled to at this point.
post #593 of 658
on another flight, was contemplating the the revenant vs complete opposite, the station agent



it's an incredibly boring film that follows the life of an otherwise unremarkable man of very small stature who is struck initially by what is supposed to be a tragedy except for his very muted reaction. this sparks a series of formative events for people who deal with their own issues. somehow it all seems so real...each character's peculiarities, a miserable middle of nowhere in New Jersey, and a beautiful story of friendships blooms.
post #594 of 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

can probably be said about a gabazilion movies, but I wonder what folks who went through it think of this

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/17/revenant-leonardo-dicaprio-violent-meaningless-glorification-pain

i haven't seen it nor do i feel compelled to at this point.

Sipang is absolutely right -- especially about the dreamy flashbacks. But that woman sounds like a complete and puritanical idiot. It's "emotionally vacant," absolutely (because the muddled storytelling sacrifices clarity on the murky altar of verité), but The Revenant is not at all remarkable in its violence. If anything, I'd be prepared to argue that it treats the subject matter with a certain amount of restraint (if in part because long takes in wide shot don't permit for the conventional close-ups of fountaining blood etc.). Rewatching Revenant and Fury Road within a day of each other, it's clear the Mad Max reboot is far more violent, more graphic, and more unabashed about reveling in vengeful brutality. In contrast, the Revenant does not contain a single image I would consider graphic enough to be "shocking" to a general audience.

But what I'm really trying to say is that in a universe where Saw and Hostel have a dozen sequels between them, where Eli Roth was successful enough with that sort of crap to go on to make The Green Inferno (a truly depressing experience for a moviegoer, in the vein of Sucker Punch), and where there is a [more-] grotesque remake of "I Spit On Your Grave" that spawned its own disgusting series, neither of those aforementioned awards contenders (which are less gratuitous than a random actioner like Face/Off) is worth whining about for 900 words. I'm only vaguely surprised she didn't mention The Hateful Eight, which was far more irksome than The Revenant (if for opposite reasons), and contained much more of the usual commentators' pet peeve, violence against women.

I meant to watch The Station Agent years ago (I had a true fascination with midgets for a while, possibly triggered by The Spy Who Shagged Me) but I never got around to it.
post #595 of 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTribe View Post


Sipang is absolutely right -- especially about the dreamy flashbacks. But that woman sounds like a complete and puritanical idiot. It's "emotionally vacant," absolutely (because the muddled storytelling sacrifices clarity on the murky altar of verité), but The Revenant is not at all remarkable in its violence. If anything, I'd be prepared to argue that it treats the subject matter with a certain amount of restraint (if in part because long takes in wide shot don't permit for the conventional close-ups of fountaining blood etc.). Rewatching Revenant and Fury Road within a day of each other, it's clear the Mad Max reboot is far more violent, more graphic, and more unabashed about reveling in vengeful brutality. In contrast, the Revenant does not contain a single image I would consider graphic enough to be "shocking" to a general audience.

But what I'm really trying to say is that in a universe where Saw and Hostel have a dozen sequels between them, where Eli Roth was successful enough with that sort of crap to go on to make The Green Inferno (a truly depressing experience for a moviegoer, in the vein of Sucker Punch), and where there is a [more-] grotesque remake of "I Spit On Your Grave" that spawned its own disgusting series, neither of those aforementioned awards contenders (which are less gratuitous than a random actioner like Face/Off) is worth whining about for 900 words. I'm only vaguely surprised she didn't mention The Hateful Eight, which was far more irksome than The Revenant (if for opposite reasons), and contained much more of the usual commentators' pet peeve, violence against women.

I meant to watch The Station Agent years ago (I had a true fascination with midgets for a while, possibly triggered by The Spy Who Shagged Me) but I never got around to it.

this is why i was wondering what people thought. it's just surprising that implied rape, for example, isn't shocking anymore to an audience. i think i've become less able to stomach violence, and movies i'd once watch and probably laugh at just disturb me now. i made the mistake of watching fury road, not knowing what it was because i had only ever seen random bits of mad max (there seemed to be a color coordination of the cars ?) and i almost threw up during the sequel. i couldn't watch kill bill movies and won't even try to sit through this newest iteration.

what you point out is fair in this universe of violence driven entertainment , but that doesn't preclude criticism especially of something that's up for wide acclaim, something I don't think saw or hostel ever were. but what's the difference between watching realistic fake violence or real violence ? you're investing yourself emotionally into the former--if you like the movie and identify with the characters--so it seems like a blurry line.
Edited by the shah - 1/23/16 at 8:45am
post #596 of 658
For clarity, I meant "image" literally (the way the MPAA treats it, i.e. what is shown on screen). The Revenant is chock full of ugly characters doing ugly deeds, but you'd be hard-pressed to find a frame of the movie that's independently controversial.

I would say the rape in The Revenant is shown, not implied, but all that is actually seen is two faces beside a tree trunk; there's no visible skin or blood (at least until she castrates him just off-screen a minute later) and there's no "violence" -- in the sense of struggle or screaming -- shown, plus it occurs in a long take so there's no cutting to other angles to emphasize any particular facet of what is going on. It's not that it isn't upsetting to watch; it is a realistic depiction of an event that is deeply upsetting, but there is nothing close to a "shocking image" put on the screen, in my opinion:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

It's hard to think about, but not hard to look at. Fury Road, by contrast, features most of someone's face being torn off in close-up at the climax.

As for your last point, I don't really disagree, I just think there are more productive targets for this particular criticism, since every other movie is some kind of revenge story that ends with a murder, and The Revenant is not particularly gratuitous about it (you mentioned Kill Bill, which makes for a useful comparison in terms of both revenge motivation and on-screen bloodshed). There are plenty of movies peddling brutal revenge to minors and showcasing extreme violence for its own sake.
Edited by GoldenTribe - 1/23/16 at 10:05am
post #597 of 658
So what does everyone think of the latest Oscars hubbub?
post #598 of 658

a theme that's been done countless times, but perhaps this one brings up some interesting "philosophical" questions. Extremely low budget ($7,000) film that fortunately doesn't fall back on fanciful cgi at the expense of plot and character development. what if academically accomplished people with little ethics--or rather, little foresight of moral implications of new actions, suddenly had the power to change everything ?

Time_Travel_Method-2.svg
post #599 of 658

I wish I saw that diagram before I watched the movie. They explain it in the film, but it's definitely a movie that needs re-watching to wrap one's mind around. 

post #600 of 658
I first heard about Primer when I was following the making of Looper, because apparently Rian Johnston called in the writer/director of Primer as a consultant on the time travel aspects.

I still haven't seen it, but it's on my list -- and there seem to be much more complicated charts about it:



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